References of "Brouyère, Serge"
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See detailDélivrable 2 (A) : Sélection des 8 zones de pollution atmosphérique de proximité
Pereira, Benoît; Schneider, Arnaud; Sonnet, Philippe et al

Report (2009)

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See detailGround water flow simulation in mining works: Application of the Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell method
Wildemeersch, Samuel ULg; Orban, Philippe ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg et al

Conference (2009, April 22)

Hydrogeological models can greatly help simulating groundwater flow in the particular context of mining works. However, classical modeling techniques are not so suited in this context because the medium ... [more ▼]

Hydrogeological models can greatly help simulating groundwater flow in the particular context of mining works. However, classical modeling techniques are not so suited in this context because the medium is strongly disturbed by shafts and networks of galleries. Consequently, specific modeling techniques have been developed. Box model techniques require only few parameters but they calculate only mean water levels in exploited zones and do not consider interactions between exploited and unexploited zones. Conversely, physically-based and spatially-distributed techniques represent explicitly both exploited and unexploited zones and take into account interactions between them but they require a lot of parameters sometimes difficult to estimate. The Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell (HFEMC) method is a new modeling technique constituting a compromise between simple and complex techniques used in mining context. The principle of this method is to fully couple a representation of exploited zones by a group of mixing cells possibly interconnected by pipes and a representation of unexploited zones by classical finite elements. Interactions between mixing cells and finite elements of the mesh are taken into account through 3rd type (Fourier) internal boundary conditions. With this method, exploited zones are characterized by mean water levels while spatially-distributed hydraulic heads are calculated for the entire adjacent and overlaying unexploited zones. Additionally, thanks to the coupling between mixing cells and finite elements, water exchanges between exploited and unexploited zones are explicitly taken into account. The HFEMC method allows also simulating groundwater rebound following mine closure and associated phenomena such as water inrushes. Concepts and equations of the HFEMC method are presented and illustrated using test cases. First results of an application on an abandoned coalfield in the region of Liege (Belgium) are also proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailLarge-scale flow and transport modelling for the management of groundwater bodies: the Geer case-study
Orban, Philippe ULg; Goderniaux, Pascal ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg

in AquaTerra Final Conference. Programme & Proceedings (2009, March)

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See detailThe Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell Method: A New Flexible Method for Modelling Mine Ground Water Problems
Brouyère, Serge ULg; Orban, Philippe ULg; Wildemeersch, Samuel ULg et al

in Mine Water & the Environment (2009), 28(2), 102-114

Dewatering operations often stop at mine closure. The ground water rebound can have undesirable consequences, which numerical models can help one understand and manage. However, classical modelling ... [more ▼]

Dewatering operations often stop at mine closure. The ground water rebound can have undesirable consequences, which numerical models can help one understand and manage. However, classical modelling techniques are relatively unsuitable to these contexts. While spatially-distributed and physically-based models suffer difficulties due to the lack of data and the complexity of geological and hydrogeological conditions, black-box models are too simple to deal with the problems effectively. A new modelling method is proposed to simulate ground water environments in which water flows through mined (exploited) and unmined (unexploited) areas. Exploited zones are simulated using a group of mixing cells possibly interconnected by pipes. Unexploited zones are simultaneously simulated using classical finite elements. This combined approach allows explicit calculation of ground water flows around the mine and mean water levels in the exploited zones. Water exchanges between exploited zones and unexploited zones are simulated in the model using specifically-defined internal boundary conditions. The method is tested on synthetic cases of increasing complexity, and first results from a real case study are presented. [less ▲]

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