References of "Brichant, Jean-François"
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See detailEmergence from Target-Controlled Anesthesia with Propofol and Sufentanil in Patients Undergoing Intracranial Surgery
Hans, Pol ULg; Lamy, M. M.; Brichant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1998), 49(1), 13-9

The study was designed to characterise the emergence from target-controlled anesthesia assessed by the recovery of spontaneous breathing, eye opening to command, and extubation in 18 adult patients ... [more ▼]

The study was designed to characterise the emergence from target-controlled anesthesia assessed by the recovery of spontaneous breathing, eye opening to command, and extubation in 18 adult patients undergoing intracranial surgery. Total intravenous anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and sufentanil. Target plasma concentration of propofol ranged between 3.0 and 5.5 micrograms.ml-1 and infusion was stopped after head dressing. The initial target plasma sufentanil concentration of 0.50 ng.ml-1 was decreased to 0.15 ng.ml-1 after craniotomy; sufentanil infusion was discontinued at the dura closure. The time from the end of surgery (head dressing) to recovery of spontaneous breathing was 8.3 +/- 6.5 min, and the time to eye opening and extubation was 14.7 +/- 10.0 min. At the end of surgery, the calculated plasma propofol concentration was 3.42 +/- 0.26 micrograms.ml-1. It significantly decreased to 2.11 +/- 0.51 micrograms.ml-1 at recovery of spontaneous breathing and to 1.81 +/- 0.41 micrograms.ml-1 at eye opening and extubation. The calculated plasma sufentanil concentration was 0.108 +/- 0.019 ng.ml-1 at the end of surgery but did not change significantly between recovery of spontaneous breathing (0.089 +/- 0.013 ng.ml-1), eye opening and extubation (0.087 +/- 0.013 ng.ml-1). The calculated plasma propofol concentrations recorded at emergence were not correlated with patient age, total dose of propofol, and duration of infusion; corresponding calculated sufentanil concentrations were not correlated with age and total dose of sufentanil. An inverse relationship (p < 0.05) was found between the duration of sufentanil infusion and the calculated sufentanil concentrations at emergence. No correlation was observed between calculated concentrations of propofol and sufentanil at emergence. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Target-Controlled Anesthesia with Propofol and Sufentanil on the Hemodynamic Response to Mayfield Head Holder Application
Hans, Pol ULg; Coussaert, E.; Cantraine, F. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1998), 49(1), 7-11

The effects of target-controlled anesthesia with propofol and sufentanil on the hemodynamic response to Mayfield head holder (MH) application were evaluated in 18 ASA I and II patients undergoing ... [more ▼]

The effects of target-controlled anesthesia with propofol and sufentanil on the hemodynamic response to Mayfield head holder (MH) application were evaluated in 18 ASA I and II patients undergoing scheduled intracranial surgery. Premedication consisted of hydroxyzine, alprazolam and atropine given orally 1 h before surgery. Anesthesia was provided with propofol and sufentanil using a target-controlled infusion device; constant calculated plasma concentrations of 4 micrograms ml-1 propofol and 0.5 ng ml-1 sufentanil were maintained throughout the study. Muscle relaxation was obtained with atracurium and ventilation was controlled with air/oxygen. The MH was fixed 45 +/- 12 min (mean +/- SD) after induction of anesthesia. Heart rate and systolic, diastolic, and mean non invasive arterial pressure were monitored and recorded 5 min before induction of anesthesia (control), 1 min before MH application (MH-1), at MH application, and 1 and 2 min after MH application. Systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate increased significantly during and after MH application when compared with MH-1 values, but remained constantly lower than control. Hemodynamic parameters measured 1 min before MH application were significantly lower than control. The results of the study indicate that target-controlled anesthesia maintained with constant calculated plasma concentrations of 4 micrograms ml-1 propofol and 0.5 ng ml-1 sufentanil prevents the increase in arterial pressure and heart rate beyond control values following MH application but may induce some degree of arterial hypotension in the absence of nociceptive stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Intercostal Muscle Compensation for Diaphragmatic Paralysis in the Dog
Brichant, Jean-François ULg; De Troyer, A.

in Journal of Physiology (1997), 500((Pt 1)), 245-53

1. Paralysis of the diaphragm in the dog is known to cause a compensatory increase in activation of the inspiratory intercostal muscles (parasternal intercostals, external intercostals, and levator costae ... [more ▼]

1. Paralysis of the diaphragm in the dog is known to cause a compensatory increase in activation of the inspiratory intercostal muscles (parasternal intercostals, external intercostals, and levator costae). The present studies were designed to assess the mechanism(s) of that compensation. 2. Complete, selective diaphragmatic paralysis was induced by injecting local anaesthetic into small silicone cuffs placed around the phrenic nerve roots in the neck. 3. Paralysis produced a decrease in tidal volume and an increase in arterial P(CO2) (P(a,CO2)). The increased hypercapnic drive was a primary determinant of the increased inspiratory intercostal activity. 4. However, paralysis also produced an increased inspiratory cranial displacement of the ribs. When this increased rib displacement was reduced to that seen before paralysis, it appeared that the increase in external intercostal and levator costae inspiratory activity was commonly greater than anticipated on the basis of the increased P(a,CO2). 5. Diaphragmatic paralysis after bilateral vagotomy also elicited disproportionate increases in inspiratory intercostal activity, thus indicating that these increases are not caused by vagal afferent inputs. 6. These observations are consistent with the idea that the intercostal muscle compensation for diaphragmatic paralysis is, in part, due to the release of an inhibition originating from the contracting diaphragm. This inhibition might arise in the diaphragmatic tendon organs. [less ▲]

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See detailAttitudes obstétricales: Consensus de Département ULg. Document des cours de troisième cycle, octobre 96
Biquet, G.; Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Dewandre, Pierre-Yves et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(3), 142-8

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See detailElevated Plasma Alpha 1-Acid Glycoprotein Levels: Lack of Connection to Resistance to Vecuronium Blockade Induced by Anticonvulsant Therapy
Hans, Pol ULg; Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Pieron, F. et al

in Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology (1997), 9(1), 3-7

This study was designed to investigate the relationships among anticonvulsant therapy, plasma alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) levels, and resistance to vecuronium blockade. Thirty-one patients scheduled ... [more ▼]

This study was designed to investigate the relationships among anticonvulsant therapy, plasma alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) levels, and resistance to vecuronium blockade. Thirty-one patients scheduled for routine neurosurgery were included in the study. The patients were treated (TG; n = 20) with phenytoin (n = 15) and/or carbamazepine (n = 4) and/or phenobarbital (n = 3) for > or = 6 days or were left untreated (UG; n = 11, control group). TG patients were further assigned to one of two subgroups according to the plasma anticonvulsant level measured the day before surgery and found to be within (TGW, n = 10) or below (TGB, n = 10) the therapeutic range. Finally, the 31 patients were divided into two more groups according to their plasma AAG levels: higher than (HAAG, n = 17) or within (NAAG, n = 14) the normal range (25-94 mg dl-1). Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and sufentanil. Muscle relaxation was obtained with vecuronium 0.1 mg kg-1. A train-of-four (TOF) stimulation mode at 2 Hz was applied to the ulnar nerve every 15 s, and neuromuscular transmission was assessed using a TOF-Guard accelograph monitor. Plasma AAG concentrations (means +/- SEM) were 103.7 +/- 7.6 mg dl-1 in TG, 80.7 +/- 6.7 mg dl-1 in UG, 95.9 +/- 13.2 mg dl-1 in TGW, 111.6 +/- 7.6 mg dl-1 in TGB. 114.9 +/- 7.4 mg dl-1 in HAAG, and 71.4 +/- 3.8 mg dl-1 in NAAG groups. The differences in plasma AAG concentrations between UG and TG and between HAAG and NAAG groups were statistically significant. No significant relationship was found between plasma AAG levels and phenytoin concentrations (r = -0.26). The time (mean +/- SEM) to recovery of T1 to 25% of control was significantly shorter in TG (28.2 +/- 1.4 min) than in UG (42.2 +/- 3.1 min) but did not differ significantly according to the plasma anticonvulsant level (27.3 +/- 2.0 min in TGW; 29.1 +/- 1.9 min in TGB) and the plasma AAG level 31.7 +/- 1.9 min in HAAG; 35.3 +/- 3.3 min in NAAG). The time for the TOF ratio to recover to 25% yielded similar profiles and statistical significance levels: TG, 32.9 +/- 2.2 min; UG, 51.2 +/- 4.0 min; TGW, 35.0 +/- 3.9 min; TGB, 30.7 +/- 1.8 min; HAAG, 38.1 +/- 3.1 min; NAAG, 42.0 +/- 4.1 min. We conclude that anticonvulsant therapy induces an increase in plasma AAG independently of the plasma anticonvulsant level. However, duration and recovery of vecuronium blockade do not differ according to plasma AAG levels. Consequently, elevated AAG does not contribute to the resistance to vecuronium blockade induced by anticonvulsants. [less ▲]

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See detailSurveillance des états hypertensifs sévères
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Percentile (1997), 2

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See detailPréparation du malade porteur d'une bronchopneumopathie obstructive
Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Bonnet, D.

in La consultation d'anesthésie et la préparation et la préparation du malade à l'intervention (1997)

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See detailSympathetic modulation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in intact dogs
Brimioulle, Serge; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Brichant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Cardiovascular Research (1997), 34

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See detailESRA guidelines for the use of epidural opioids
Aguilar, J. L.; Benhamou, D.; Bonnet, F. et al

in International Monitor on Regional Anaesthesia (1997), 9

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See detailSurveillance des états hypertensifs sévères
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Gunaïkeia (1997), 2

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See detailSurveillance des états hypertensifs sévères
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Vaisseaux, Coeur, Poumons [=VCP] (1997), 2

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See detailLe bronchospasme périopératoire
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Les situations critiques au bloc opératoire (1996)

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See detailComparison of Neuromuscular Block of Atracurium and Rocuronium in Adults
Hans, Pol ULg; Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Franzen, A. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1996), 47(2), 53-8

We studied the time-course of action of atracurium 0.5 mg kg-1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg kg-1 in 24 healthy adult patients. Anesthesia was induced with thiopentone and sufentanil, and maintained with 50 ... [more ▼]

We studied the time-course of action of atracurium 0.5 mg kg-1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg kg-1 in 24 healthy adult patients. Anesthesia was induced with thiopentone and sufentanil, and maintained with 50% nitrous oxide and 1% enflurane in oxygen. Neuromuscular transmission was monitored by stimulating the ulnar nerve at the wrist and measuring the acceleration of the thumb using the TOF-Guard accelerograph monitor. Supramaximal stimuli of 0.2 ms duration were applied in a single twitch stimulation mode at 1 Hz frequency until completion of block, and in train-of four (TOF) sequence at 2 Hz every 15 sec thereafter. Onset time was longer with atracurium (mean +/- SD:90 +/- 18 sec) than with rocuronium (49 +/- 6 sec). Clinical duration of action (Tl25) was longer with atracurium (52.3 +/- 7.2 min) than with rocuronium (40.0 +/- 6.4 min). Recovery index (Tl25-Tl75) and time for TOF ratio to recover to 0.75 were 17.8 +/- 4.2 and 73.9 +/- 8.8 min with atracurium, and 13.8 +/- 4.1 and 70.4 +/- 14.1 min with rocuronium. The differences between both groups were statistically significant except the difference in the time for TOF to return to 0.75. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of Plasma Anticonvulsant Level on Pipecuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Blockade: Preliminary Results
Hans, Pol ULg; Ledoux, Didier ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg et al

in Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology (1995), 7(4), 254-8

Patients receiving anticonvulsants are resistant to nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (NDMR). This study examines the effect of plasma anticonvulsant levels on pipecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade ... [more ▼]

Patients receiving anticonvulsants are resistant to nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (NDMR). This study examines the effect of plasma anticonvulsant levels on pipecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. Twenty adult patients scheduled for neurosurgery were assigned to one of two groups. Group 0 (G0) consisted of 10 patients not on anticonvulsant therapy; group 1 (G1) included 10 patients treated either with phenytoin or carbamazepine. G1 patients were further divided into G1u (n = 4) and G1w (n = 6) subgroups, according to the plasma anticonvulsant level measured the day before surgery--under (G1u) or within (G1w) the therapeutic range. Neuromuscular transmission was monitored with a Biometer International A/S Accelograph. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using propofol and sufentanil. After calibration of the accelograph, a bolus of pipecuronium 0.08 mg/kg was given IV. The time from pipecuronium injection to the peak reduction of T1 was taken as the onset time. The time in min from pipecuronium injection to recovery of T1% (first accelograph response/baseline response) x 100 and TR% (fourth accelograph response/first accelograph response) x 100 were recorded at 25, 50, and 75% of baseline. The recovery index (RI) was taken as the time from 25 to 75% of baseline. The recovery index (RI) was taken as the time from 25 to 75% recovery of the baseline response. The onset time was not different in G0 (203 +/- 60.4 s), G1 (230.5 +/- 79.3 s), and G1u (181.8 +/- 60.4 s) but prolonged in G1w (279.2 +/- 67.7 s).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailEchanges gazeux au niveau pulmonaire
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Physiologie en Anesthésiologie (1995)

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See detailAnaesthesia for minimally invasive abdominal surgery
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Recent advances in anaesthesia and analgesia (1995)

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See detailBloc 3 en 1 et chirurgie du membre inférieur
Brichant, Jean-François ULg; François, D.

in L'anesthésie loco-régionale (1994)

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See detailPre-operative respiratory evaluation and preparation: what is important?
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

in Refresher Course Lectures (1994)

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See detailCinétique de récupération fonctionnelle de la ventilation pulmonaire après pontage aortocoronaire
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Parisse, J.; Camus, G. et al

in Annales de Réadaptation et de Médecine Physique (1994), 37

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