References of "Brédart, Serge"
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See detailSelf-recognition in everyday life
Brédart, Serge ULg; Young, A. W.

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (2004), 9(3), 183-197

INTRODUCTION: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and Capgras delusion). METHOD: A total of 70 participants recalled experiences from memory. Incidents (n = 51) were recorded on questionnaire sheets that were filled out at home. Reports of three categories of incidents were analysed: misidentifications (the participant misidentified her/his own face as being that of another familiar person; n = 5), recognition failures (the participant judged that his/her own face was that of an unfamiliar person; n = 20) and perception of unusual aspects (the participant confidently recognised his/her own face but found that the seen face did not fit well the representation she/he had of his/her own face; n = 26). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In the reported incidents, experiences showing some similarities to those of patients with prosopagnosia, Capgras delusion or mirrored-self misidentification were noted. However, across the whole study, no incident involved a failure of reality testing; in contrast to pathological forms of error, in all of the reported incidents from our study the participant realised that a mistake had been made. The importance of decision processes in pathological forms of own-face misrecognition is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen Memory Shifts Toward More Typical Category Exemplars: Accentuation Effects in the Recollection of Ethnically Ambiguous Faces
Corneille, Olivier; Huart, Johanne ULg; Becquart, Emilie et al

in Journal of Personality & Social Psychology (2004), 86

In 4 studies, the authors examined the impact of categorization on the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces. Participants were presented with faces lying at various locations on mixed-race continua ... [more ▼]

In 4 studies, the authors examined the impact of categorization on the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces. Participants were presented with faces lying at various locations on mixed-race continua (i.e., Caucasian–North African and Caucasian–Asian faces were used as source images in a morphing program). In all studies, the prevalence of exclusive ethnic features in a face distorted participants’ recollections of the face toward faces more typical of the category. Specifically, the recollection of 30% North African (or 30% Asian) faces shifted toward Caucasian source faces, whereas the recollection of 70% North African (or 70% Asian) faces shifted toward North African (Asian) source faces. Memory distortions did not emerge for extremely ambiguous (50%) faces and proved larger on mixed-race than same-race continua (Studies 3 and 4). Memory distortions also emerged with high levels of confidence. The authors elaborate on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. [less ▲]

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See detailSouvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs
Brédart, Serge ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

Book published by Solal (2004)

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See detailAvant-propos
Brédart, Serge ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Brédart, Serge (Ed.) Souvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs (2004)

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See detailLa récupération de souvenirs d'abus sexuels infantiles chez l'adulte
Brédart, Serge ULg

in Brédart, Serge (Ed.) Souvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs (2004)

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See detailFurther exploration memory bias in compulsive washers
Ceschi, G.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Dunker, D. et al

in Behaviour Research and Therapy (2003), 41(6), 737-748

The aim of the present study was to replicate Radomsky and Rachman's findings on memory bias in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), using the same procedure but an increased sample size, more specific ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to replicate Radomsky and Rachman's findings on memory bias in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), using the same procedure but an increased sample size, more specific control groups, and a full analysis of contamination attribution data. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenomenal characteristics of cryptomnesia
Brédart, Serge ULg; Lampinen, J. M.; Defeldre, A. C.

in Memory (2003), 11(1), 1-11

Qualitative characteristics of cryptomnesia, or unintentional plagiarism were investigated. In Experiment I we compared accurate and inaccurate source attributions in terms of their level of confidence ... [more ▼]

Qualitative characteristics of cryptomnesia, or unintentional plagiarism were investigated. In Experiment I we compared accurate and inaccurate source attributions in terms of their level of confidence using instructions that did not require a fixed number of responses. Confidence was lower for plagiarised responses than for correct responses. Nevertheless, participants provided high ratings of certainty for a large proportion of their plagiarised responses. In Experiment 2 the phenomenological differences between plagiarised recall and veridical recall were compared by using an adaptation of the memory characteristics questionnaire (Johnson, Foley, Suengas, [less ▲]

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See detailRecognising the usual orientation of one's own face : the role of asymmetrically located details
Brédart, Serge ULg

in Perception (2003), 32(7), 805-811

Our ability to recognise the usual horizontal orientation Of Our own face (mirror orientation) as compared with another very familiar face (normal orientation) was examined in experiment 1. Participants ... [more ▼]

Our ability to recognise the usual horizontal orientation Of Our own face (mirror orientation) as compared with another very familiar face (normal orientation) was examined in experiment 1. Participants did not use the same kind of information in determining the orientation of their own face as in determining the orientation of the other familiar face. The proportion of participants who reported having based their judgment on the location of an asymmetric feature (eg a mole) was higher when determining the orientation of their own face than when determining that of the other familiar face. In experiment 2, participants were presented with pairs of manipulated images of their own face and of another familiar face showing conflicting asymmetric features and configural information. Each pair consisted of one picture showing asymmetric features of a given face in a mirror-reversed position, while the facial configuration was left unchanged; and one picture in which the location of the asymmetric features was left unchanged, while the facial configuration was mirror-reversed. As expected from the hypothesis that asymmetric local features are more frequently used for the judgment of one's own face, participants chose the picture showing mirror-reversed asymmetric features when determining the usual orientation of their own face significantly more often than they chose the picture showing normally oriented asymmetric features when determining the orientation of the other face. These results are explained in terms of competing forward and mirror-reversed representations of one's own face. [less ▲]

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See detailPreschoolers' use of form class cues to learn descriptive proper names
Hall, D. G.; Waxman, S. R.; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in Child Development (2003), 74(5), 1547-1560

This study examined 3- and 4-year-old preschoolers' ability to learn proper names containing familiar descriptions. Children saw a novel creature with a familiar property (it was red) and heard either an ... [more ▼]

This study examined 3- and 4-year-old preschoolers' ability to learn proper names containing familiar descriptions. Children saw a novel creature with a familiar property (it was red) and heard either an adjective ("This is a red one") or a descriptive proper name ("This is Mr. Red"). The creature was then transformed, losing the property (e.g., it became green). Children had to extend the word to either the transformed original creature or a new creature bearing the original property (another red creature). Children, especially 4-year-olds, extended the adjective to the new creature but were significantly more likely to extend the proper name to the original creature. Lexical form class cues provided potent information about word meaning, directing preschoolers to reinterpret familiar descriptive terms (adjectives) as homophonic terms designating unique individuals (proper names). [less ▲]

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See detailVieillissement, qualité de l’encodage et faux souvenirs
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2002, September)

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See detailThe effects of divided attention on the occurrence of false memories
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Siffert, Jason

Poster (2002, April)

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See detailSource monitoring, False memories and aging
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2002, March)

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See detailAn other-race effect in age discrimination from faces
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2001, September)

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See detailAn 'other-race' effect in age estimation from faces
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Perception (2001), 30(9), 1107-1113

Previous studies have shown that, in person-recognition tasks, people performance better for gaces belonging to their own race than for those belonging to another race. Recently, however, this 'other-race ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have shown that, in person-recognition tasks, people performance better for gaces belonging to their own race than for those belonging to another race. Recently, however, this 'other-race' effect has also been found in a sex-discrimination task (O'Toole et al, 1996, Perception 25, 669-676). In the present study, we investigated wheter this finding extends to age perception. Caucasian and African participants were asked to estimate the age of Caucasian and African faces. The main result of this experiment was a significant 'race of subject' x 'race of face' interaction showing that Caucasian participants performed better at evaluating Caucasian faces than African faces. However, African participants performed equally with both type of faces. This result is explained by the Africans' time of residence in Belgium. This implication of this 'older-race' effect for age estimation is discussed with respect to eyewitness reports. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial cues and verbal framing in risky choice
Wang, X. T.; Simons, F.; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Journal of Behavioral Decision Making (2001), 14

We examined how people use social and verbal cues of differing priorities in making social decisions. In Experiment 1, formally identical life-death choice problems were presented in different ... [more ▼]

We examined how people use social and verbal cues of differing priorities in making social decisions. In Experiment 1, formally identical life-death choice problems were presented in different hypothetical group contexts and were phrased in either a positive or negative frame. The risk-seeking choice became more dominant as the number of kin in an endangered group increased. Framing effects occurred only in a heterogeneous group context where the lives at risk were a mixture of kin and strangers. No framing effect was found when the same problem was presented in the context of a homogeneous group consisting of either all kin or all strangers. We viewed the framing effects to be a sign of indecisive risk preference due to the differential effects of a kinship cue and a stranger cue on choice. In Experiment 2, we presented the life-death problem in two artificial group contexts involving either 6 billion human lives or 6 billion extraterrestrial lives. A framing effect was found only in the human context. Two pre-conditions of framing effects appear to be social unfamiliarity of a decision problem and aspiration level of a decision maker. In Experiment 3, we analyzed the direction of the framing effect by balancing the framing. The direction of the framing effect depended on the baseline level of risk preference determined by a specific decision conte [less ▲]

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See detailPresentation of a French version ot the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire
Laroi, Frank ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in European Review of Applied Psychology = Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée (2001), 52

In recent years an increasing interest in attributional style in both normal and pathological populations has developed. In that context, the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire ... [more ▼]

In recent years an increasing interest in attributional style in both normal and pathological populations has developed. In that context, the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire (IPSAQ) was constructed. We investigated the psychometric properties of a French translation of the IPSAQ in a normal population.The results offer evidence that the present french translation has similarly adequate psychometric porperties as the original english version [less ▲]

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See detailWhen false memories do not occur : not thinking of the lure or remembering that it was not heard ?
Brédart, Serge ULg

in Memory (2000), 8(2), 123-128

The aim of the present study was to evaluate two explanations for the non-occurrence of false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. One explanation was that a critical lure is not ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to evaluate two explanations for the non-occurrence of false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. One explanation was that a critical lure is not recalled because the list failed to evoke it in the participant's mind. Another possible explanation was that the participant would identify the critical lure and would remember, at the time of recall, that the lure was not produced by an external source. In order to explore these two possible explanations for the non-occurrence of false memories, an experimental phase was added to the usual DRM paradigm: participants were asked to recall items they thought of but did not recall because these items were not members of the list presented by the experimenter. Among participants who did not recall the critical lure during the standard recall task, those who recalled the critical lure during the additional phase outnumbered those who did not recall it. This result is more consistent with the second explanation than with the first one. [less ▲]

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