References of "Brédart, Serge"
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See detailBrain response to one's own name in vegetative state, minimally conscious state and locked-in syndrome
Perrin, F.; Schnakers, Caroline ULiege; Schabus, M. et al

in Archives of Neurology (2006), 63

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See detailThe accuracy of memory for faces of personally known individuals
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Devue, Christel ULiege

in Perception (2006), 35(1), 101-106

The present study was aimed at evaluating whether the very high accuracy of memory for familiar faces, demonstrated by Ge et al (2003, Perception 32 601-614) with a very familiar famous person ... [more ▼]

The present study was aimed at evaluating whether the very high accuracy of memory for familiar faces, demonstrated by Ge et al (2003, Perception 32 601-614) with a very familiar famous person, generalises to faces of personally known individuals. The accuracy of participants' perceptual memory for a close colleague's face and for their own face was evaluated by presenting original and manipulated pictures of these two targets. The manipulation consisted of increasing or decreasing the interocular distance. As in Ge et al's study, results indicated that proportions of correct recognition of the original faces, and just noticeable differences for the detection of alterations in the recognition task, were not significantly different from the corresponding measures in a perceptual discrimination task performed by a sample of participants who did not know the target persons at all. High accuracy of memory generalises to faces of personally known individuals [less ▲]

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See detailNaming very familiar people : when retrieving names is faster than retrieving semantic biographical information
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Brennen, T.; Delchambre, Marie ULiege et al

in British Journal of Psychology (2005), 96(Pt 2), 205-214

One of the most reliable findings in the literature on person indentification is that semantic categorization of a face occurs more quickly than naming a face. Here we present two experiments in which ... [more ▼]

One of the most reliable findings in the literature on person indentification is that semantic categorization of a face occurs more quickly than naming a face. Here we present two experiments in which participants are shown the faces of their colleagues, i.e., personally familiar people, encountered with high frequency. In each experiment, naming was faster than making a semantic classification, despite the fact that the semantic classifications were highly salient to the participants (Experiment I highest degree obtained; Experiment 2: nationality). The finding is consistent with models that allow or parallel access from faces to semantic information and to names, and demonstrates the need for the frequency of exposure to names to be taken into account in models of proper name processing e.g. Burke, Mackay, Worthley and Wade (1991). [less ▲]

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See detailThe accuracy of perceptual memory for personally known faces
Devue, Christel ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Poster (2005)

Recently, Ge et al. (2003) reported a very high accuracy of memory for a highly familiar face. Their Chinese participants had to identify the most veridical appearance of Mao’s face among unaltered and ... [more ▼]

Recently, Ge et al. (2003) reported a very high accuracy of memory for a highly familiar face. Their Chinese participants had to identify the most veridical appearance of Mao’s face among unaltered and transformed (inter-ocular distance was gradually increased or decreased) versions of his portrait. In the present experiment, the same facial transformations were applied to our participants’ faces to evaluate whether this hyperfidelity for familiar faces is specific to famous individuals whose face is mainly known from a standard portrait or if it could generalise to personally known faces (the own face and a close person’s face). Results showed that performance was not different for the two familiar faces in the recognition task, or between the recognition task and a perceptual discrimination task. The high accuracy of memory previously shown for a very famous face generalises to personally known individuals for whom we have a various visual experience. [less ▲]

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See detailThe accuracy of perceptual memory for personally known faces
Devue, Christel ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Perception (2005), 34(Suppl. S), 166

Recently, Ge et al (2003 Perception 32 601 - 614) reported a very high accuracy of memory for a highly familiar face. Their Chinese participants had to identify the most veridical appearance of Mao's face ... [more ▼]

Recently, Ge et al (2003 Perception 32 601 - 614) reported a very high accuracy of memory for a highly familiar face. Their Chinese participants had to identify the most veridical appearance of Mao's face among unaltered and transformed (interocular distance was gradually increased or decreased) versions of his portrait. In the present experiment, the same facial transformations were applied to our participants' faces to evaluate whether this hyperfidelity for familiar faces is specific to famous individuals whose face is mainly known from a standard portrait, or if it could generalise to personally known faces (the own face and a close person's face). Results showed that performance was not different for the two familiar faces in the recognition task, or between the recognition task and a perceptual discrimination task. The high accuracy of memory previously shown for a very famous face generalises to personally known individuals for whom we have a varied visual experience. [less ▲]

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See detailThe accuracy of perceptual memory for personally known faces
Devue, Christel ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Poster (2005)

Recently, Ge et al. (2003) reported a very high accuracy of memory for a highly familiar face. Their Chinese participants had to identify the most veridical appearance of Mao’s face among unaltered and ... [more ▼]

Recently, Ge et al. (2003) reported a very high accuracy of memory for a highly familiar face. Their Chinese participants had to identify the most veridical appearance of Mao’s face among unaltered and transformed (inter-ocular distance was gradually increased or decreased) versions of his portrait. In the present experiment, the same facial transformations were applied to our participants’ faces to evaluate whether this hyperfidelity for familiar faces is specific to famous individuals whose face is mainly known from a standard portrait or if it could generalise to personally known faces (the own face and a close person’s face). Results showed that performance was not different for the two familiar faces in the recognition task, or between the recognition task and a perceptual discrimination task. The high accuracy of memory previously shown for a very famous face generalises to personally known individuals for whom we have a various visual experience. [less ▲]

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See detailVieillissement, qualité de l’encodage et faux souvenirs.
Dehon, Hedwige ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Taconnat, Laurence; Vanneste, Sandrine; Clarys, David (Eds.) et al Manifestations cognitives du vieillissement psychologique. Actes des VIIème Journées d’étude du Vieillissement Cognitif (2005)

The current experiment explored the effect of enhancing the quality of encoding on the creation of false memories in older participants. Three groups of participants (1 group of younger adults and two ... [more ▼]

The current experiment explored the effect of enhancing the quality of encoding on the creation of false memories in older participants. Three groups of participants (1 group of younger adults and two groups of older adults) were presented with a modified version (Brédart, 2000) of the DRM paradigm (Roediger & McDermott, 1995) which permitted to elicit false recall. We used a short interstimuli interval (ISI of 1.5 sec) in the younger and the older control group. A slower rate of presentation was used in the experimental older group (ISI of 3 seconds). The comparison of younger and older controls confirmed a greater susceptibility to false memories in the elderly. In addition, supporting our predictions, when both older groups were compared, lengthening of the ISI led to : a) an improvement of the quality of the encoding, b) an improvement of the source monitoring. These data suggest that the deficits in source monitoring, resulting in the higher sensibility to false memories in older adults, might be related to a differential encoding of the material that would not allow the correct binding of items and their presentation context durant the learning phase. [less ▲]

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See detailCross-modal facilitation is not specific to self-face recognition
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Consciousness & Cognition (2004), 13(3), 610-612

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See detailSelf-recognition in everyday life
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Young, A. W.

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (2004), 9(3), 183-197

INTRODUCTION: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and Capgras delusion). METHOD: A total of 70 participants recalled experiences from memory. Incidents (n = 51) were recorded on questionnaire sheets that were filled out at home. Reports of three categories of incidents were analysed: misidentifications (the participant misidentified her/his own face as being that of another familiar person; n = 5), recognition failures (the participant judged that his/her own face was that of an unfamiliar person; n = 20) and perception of unusual aspects (the participant confidently recognised his/her own face but found that the seen face did not fit well the representation she/he had of his/her own face; n = 26). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In the reported incidents, experiences showing some similarities to those of patients with prosopagnosia, Capgras delusion or mirrored-self misidentification were noted. However, across the whole study, no incident involved a failure of reality testing; in contrast to pathological forms of error, in all of the reported incidents from our study the participant realised that a mistake had been made. The importance of decision processes in pathological forms of own-face misrecognition is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen Memory Shifts Toward More Typical Category Exemplars: Accentuation Effects in the Recollection of Ethnically Ambiguous Faces
Corneille, Olivier; Huart, Johanne ULiege; Becquart, Emilie et al

in Journal of Personality & Social Psychology (2004), 86

In 4 studies, the authors examined the impact of categorization on the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces. Participants were presented with faces lying at various locations on mixed-race continua ... [more ▼]

In 4 studies, the authors examined the impact of categorization on the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces. Participants were presented with faces lying at various locations on mixed-race continua (i.e., Caucasian–North African and Caucasian–Asian faces were used as source images in a morphing program). In all studies, the prevalence of exclusive ethnic features in a face distorted participants’ recollections of the face toward faces more typical of the category. Specifically, the recollection of 30% North African (or 30% Asian) faces shifted toward Caucasian source faces, whereas the recollection of 70% North African (or 70% Asian) faces shifted toward North African (Asian) source faces. Memory distortions did not emerge for extremely ambiguous (50%) faces and proved larger on mixed-race than same-race continua (Studies 3 and 4). Memory distortions also emerged with high levels of confidence. The authors elaborate on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. [less ▲]

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See detailSouvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege

Book published by Solal (2004)

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See detailAvant-propos
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege

in Brédart, Serge (Ed.) Souvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs (2004)

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See detailLa récupération de souvenirs d'abus sexuels infantiles chez l'adulte
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Brédart, Serge (Ed.) Souvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs (2004)

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See detailFurther exploration memory bias in compulsive washers
Ceschi, G.; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege; Dunker, D. et al

in Behaviour Research and Therapy (2003), 41(6), 737-748

The aim of the present study was to replicate Radomsky and Rachman's findings on memory bias in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), using the same procedure but an increased sample size, more specific ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to replicate Radomsky and Rachman's findings on memory bias in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), using the same procedure but an increased sample size, more specific control groups, and a full analysis of contamination attribution data. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenomenal characteristics of cryptomnesia
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Lampinen, J. M.; Defeldre, A. C.

in Memory (2003), 11(1), 1-11

Qualitative characteristics of cryptomnesia, or unintentional plagiarism were investigated. In Experiment I we compared accurate and inaccurate source attributions in terms of their level of confidence ... [more ▼]

Qualitative characteristics of cryptomnesia, or unintentional plagiarism were investigated. In Experiment I we compared accurate and inaccurate source attributions in terms of their level of confidence using instructions that did not require a fixed number of responses. Confidence was lower for plagiarised responses than for correct responses. Nevertheless, participants provided high ratings of certainty for a large proportion of their plagiarised responses. In Experiment 2 the phenomenological differences between plagiarised recall and veridical recall were compared by using an adaptation of the memory characteristics questionnaire (Johnson, Foley, Suengas, [less ▲]

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See detailRecognising the usual orientation of one's own face : the role of asymmetrically located details
Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Perception (2003), 32(7), 805-811

Our ability to recognise the usual horizontal orientation Of Our own face (mirror orientation) as compared with another very familiar face (normal orientation) was examined in experiment 1. Participants ... [more ▼]

Our ability to recognise the usual horizontal orientation Of Our own face (mirror orientation) as compared with another very familiar face (normal orientation) was examined in experiment 1. Participants did not use the same kind of information in determining the orientation of their own face as in determining the orientation of the other familiar face. The proportion of participants who reported having based their judgment on the location of an asymmetric feature (eg a mole) was higher when determining the orientation of their own face than when determining that of the other familiar face. In experiment 2, participants were presented with pairs of manipulated images of their own face and of another familiar face showing conflicting asymmetric features and configural information. Each pair consisted of one picture showing asymmetric features of a given face in a mirror-reversed position, while the facial configuration was left unchanged; and one picture in which the location of the asymmetric features was left unchanged, while the facial configuration was mirror-reversed. As expected from the hypothesis that asymmetric local features are more frequently used for the judgment of one's own face, participants chose the picture showing mirror-reversed asymmetric features when determining the usual orientation of their own face significantly more often than they chose the picture showing normally oriented asymmetric features when determining the orientation of the other face. These results are explained in terms of competing forward and mirror-reversed representations of one's own face. [less ▲]

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