References of "Borges, Alberto"
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See detailTemporal variability and spatial dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and fluxes in the Zambezi River system
Teodoru, C; Borges, Alberto ULg; bouillon, S et al

Conference (2014, April 27)

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See detailInorganic and organic carbon spatial variability in the Congo River during high waters (December 2013)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Bouillon, S; Teodoru, C et al

Poster (2014, April 27)

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See detailThe age of river-transported carbon: new data from African catchments and a global perspective
Marwick, TR; Tamooh, F; Teodoru, C et al

Conference (2014, April 27)

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See detailDisproportionate contribution of riparian inputs to organic carbon in freshwater systems
Marwick, TR; Van Acker, K; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

Conference (2014, April 27)

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See detailCarbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles
Ciais, Philippe; Sabine, Christopher; Bala, Govindasamy et al

in Stocker, T. F.; Qin, D.; Plattner, G.-K. (Eds.) et al Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2014)

The present perturbations of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as their past variations (coupled to climate variations) and their projected ... [more ▼]

The present perturbations of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as their past variations (coupled to climate variations) and their projected future evolutions over the 21st century are reviewed. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing active and passive acoustics to assess O2 production of a Posidonia oceanica meadow
Felisberto, P; Zabel, F; Rodriguez, O et al

Poster (2014, March 04)

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See detailHypoxia and biogeochemical processes concurrently impact acidification in a seasonally stratified coastal marine lake
Hagens, M; Slomp, CP; Meysman, FJR et al

Conference (2014, February 23)

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See detailNO3- Reduction is Fe-Dependent in a Ferruginous Chemocline
Michiels, C.; Darchambeau, François ULg; Roland, Fleur ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailDisproportionate contribution of riparian inputs to organic carbon in freshwater systems
Marwick, TR; Van Acker, K; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

Poster (2014)

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See detailThe age of river-transported carbon: new data from African catchments and a global perspective
Marwick, TR; Tamooh, F; Teodoru, CR et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailRiverine fluxes of sediments and carbon in the lower Tana River: the importance of floodplain retention
Tamooh, F.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailWetlands influencing river biogeochemistry: the case study of the Zambezi and the Kafue Rivers
Teodoru, CR; Nyoni, FC; Nyambe, I et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailCarbon Cycling of Lake Kivu (East Africa): Net Autotrophy in the Epilimnion and Emission of CO2 to the Atmosphere Sustained by Geogenic Inputs
Borges, Alberto ULg; Morana, C; Bouillon, S et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(10), 109500

We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2) oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa), acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal ... [more ▼]

We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2) oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa), acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal variations (March 2007–mid rainy season, September 2007–late dry season, June 2008–early dry season, and April 2009–late rainy season). The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu showed modest spatial (coefficient of variation between 3% and 6%), and seasonal variations with an amplitude of 163 ppm (between 579±23 ppm on average in March 2007 and 742±28 ppm on average in September 2007). The most prominent spatial feature of the pCO2 distribution was the very high pCO2 values in Kabuno Bay (a small sub-basin with little connection to the main lake) ranging between 11213 ppm and 14213 ppm (between 18 and 26 times higher than in the main basin). Surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu were a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere at an average rate of 10.8 mmol m−2 d−1, which is lower than the global average reported for freshwater, saline, and volcanic lakes. In Kabuno Bay, the CO2 emission to the atmosphere was on average 500.7 mmol m−2 d−1 (~46 times higher than in the main basin). Based on whole-lake mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bulk concentrations and of its stable carbon isotope composition, we show that the epilimnion of Lake Kivu was net autotrophic. This is due to the modest river inputs of organic carbon owing to the small ratio of catchment area to lake surface area (2.15). The carbon budget implies that the CO2 emission to the atmosphere must be sustained by DIC inputs of geogenic origin from deep geothermal springs. [less ▲]

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See detailNew Insights into Iron-Based Photosynthesis
Thompson, K; Lliros, M; Borrego, C et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailDisproportionate contribution of riparian inputs to organic carbon pools in freshwater systems
Marwick, T.R.; Borges, Alberto ULg; Van Acker, K. et al

in Ecosystems (2014), 17

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See detailContrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)
Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P. et al

in Scientific Reports (2014), 4

The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to ... [more ▼]

The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. d13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1 per mil and -25.8 per mil, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin. [less ▲]

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See detailCurrent systematic carbon-cycle observations and the need for implementing a policy-relevant carbon observing system
Ciais, P.; Dolman, A. J.; Bombelli, A. et al

in Biogeosciences (2014), 11(13), 3547--3602

A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify ... [more ▼]

A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify the effectiveness of policies aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Building an integrated carbon observation system requires transformational advances from the existing sparse, exploratory framework towards a dense, robust, and sustained system in all components: anthropogenic emissions, the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. The paper is addressed to scientists, policymakers, and funding agencies who need to have a global picture of the current state of the (diverse) carbon observations.We identify the current state of carbon observations, and the needs and notional requirements for a global integrated carbon observation system that can be built in the next decade. A key conclusion is the substantial expansion of the ground-based observation networks required to reach the high spatial resolution for CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and for carbon stocks for addressing policy-relevant objectives, and attributing flux changes to underlying processes in each region. In order to establish flux and stock diagnostics over areas such as the southern oceans, tropical forests, and the Arctic, in situ observations will have to be complemented with remote-sensing measurements. Remote sensing offers the advantage of dense spatial coverage and frequent revisit. A key challenge is to bring remote-sensing measurements to a level of long-term consistency and accuracy so that they can be efficiently combined in models to reduce uncertainties, in synergy with groundbased data. Bringing tight observational constraints on fossil fuel and land use change emissions will be the biggest challenge for deployment of a policy-relevant integrated carbon observation system. This will require in situ and remotely sensed data at much higher resolution and density than currently achieved for natural fluxes, although over a small land area (cities, industrial sites, power plants), as well as the inclusion of fossil fuel CO2 proxy measurements such as radiocarbon in CO2 and carbon-fuel combustion tracers. Additionally, a policy-relevant carbon monitoring system should also provide mechanisms for reconciling regional top-down (atmosphere-based) and bottom-up (surface-based) flux estimates across the range of spatial and temporal scales relevant to mitigation policies. In addition, uncertainties for each observation data-stream should be assessed. The success of the system will rely on long-term commitments to monitoring, on improved international collaboration to fill gaps in the current observations, on sustained efforts to improve access to the different data streams and make databases interoperable, and on the calibration of each component of the system to agreed-upon international scales. [less ▲]

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