References of "Borges, Alberto"
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See detailOur present understanding of Lake Kivu ecology
Darchambeau, François ULg; Sarmento, Hugo; Isumbisho, Mwapu et al

Conference (2009, January 19)

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See detailCarbon cycling in the mixolimnion of Lake Kivu : results from the CAKI project
Borges, Alberto ULg; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Conference (2009, January 19)

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See detailSeasonal Variability of Carbon Dioxide in the Rivers and Lagoons of Ivory Coast (West Africa)
Koné, Yéfanlan José-Mathieu; Abril, Gwenaël; Kouadio, K. N. et al

in Estuaries and Coasts (2009), 32

We report partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and ancillary data in three rivers (Bia, Tanoé, and Comoé) and five lagoons (Tendo, Aby, Ebrié, Potou, and Grand-Lahou) in Ivory Coast (West Africa), during four ... [more ▼]

We report partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and ancillary data in three rivers (Bia, Tanoé, and Comoé) and five lagoons (Tendo, Aby, Ebrié, Potou, and Grand-Lahou) in Ivory Coast (West Africa), during four cruises covering the main climatic seasons. The three rivers were oversaturated in CO2 with respect to atmospheric equilibrium, and the seasonal variability of pCO2 was due to dilution during the flooding period. Surface waters of the Potou, Ebrié, and Grand-Lahou lagoons were oversaturated in CO2 during all seasons. These lagoons behaved similarly to the oligohaline regions of macrotidal estuaries that are CO2 sources to the atmosphere due to net ecosystem heterotrophy and inputs of riverine CO2 rich waters. The Aby and Tendo lagoons were undersaturated in CO2 with respect to the atmosphere because of their permanent haline stratification (unlike the other lagoons) that seemed to lead to higher phytoplankton production and export of organic carbon below the pycnocline. [less ▲]

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See detailReconciling opposing views on carbon cycling in the coastal ocean: continental shelves as sinks and near-shore ecosystems as sources of atmospheric CO2
Chen, C. T. A.; Borges, Alberto ULg

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2009), 56(8-10), 578-590

Despite their moderately-sized surface area, continental marginal seas play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, as they receive huge amounts of upwelled and riverine inputs of ... [more ▼]

Despite their moderately-sized surface area, continental marginal seas play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, as they receive huge amounts of upwelled and riverine inputs of carbon and nutrients, sustaining a disproportionate large biological activity compared to their relative surface area. A synthesis of worldwide measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) indicates that most open shelves in the temperate and high latitude regions are under-saturated with respect to atmospheric CO2 during all seasons, although the low latitude shelves seem to be over-saturated. Most inner estuaries and near-shore coastal areas on the other hand are over-saturated with respect to atmospheric CO2. The scaling of air-sea CO2 fluxes based on pCO2 measurements and carbon mass balance calculations indicate that the continental shelves absorb atmospheric CO2 ranging between 0.33 to 0.36 Pg C yr-1 that corresponds to an additional sink of 27% to ~30% of the CO2 uptake by the open oceans based on the most recent pCO2 climatology (Takahashi et al., 2008; Deep-Sea Research II, this issue). Inner estuaries, salt marshes and mangroves emit up to 0.50 Pg C yr-1, although these estimates are prone to large uncertainty due to poorly constrained ecosystem surface area estimates. Nevertheless, the view of continental shelves as sinks and near-shore ecosystems as sources of atmospheric CO2 allows reconciling long-lived opposing views on carbon cycling in the coastal ocean. [less ▲]

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See detailThe North Sea
Thomas, H.; Bozec, Y.; de Baar, Hein J. W. et al

in Carbon and Nutrient Fluxes in Continental Margins (2009)

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See detailEffect of eutrophication on air-sea CO2 fluxes in the coastal Southern North Sea: a model study of the past 50 years
Gypens, N.; Borges, Alberto ULg; Lancelot, C.

in Global Change Biology (2009), 15(4), 1040-1056

The RIVERSTRAHLER model, an idealized biogeochemical model of the river system, has been coupled to MIRO-CO2, a complex biogeochemical model describing diatom and Phaeocystis blooms and carbon and ... [more ▼]

The RIVERSTRAHLER model, an idealized biogeochemical model of the river system, has been coupled to MIRO-CO2, a complex biogeochemical model describing diatom and Phaeocystis blooms and carbon and nutrient cycles in the marine domain, to assess the dual role of changing nutrient loads and increasing atmospheric CO2 as drivers of air–sea CO2 exchanges in the Southern North Sea with a focus on the Belgian coastal zone (BCZ). The whole area, submitted to the influence of two main rivers (Seine and Scheldt), is characterized by variable diatom and Phaeocystis colonies blooms which impact on the trophic status and air–sea CO2 fluxes of the coastal ecosystem. For this application, the MIRO-CO2 model is implemented in a 0D multibox frame covering the eutrophied Eastern English Channel and Southern North Sea and receiving loads from the rivers Seine and Scheldt. Model simulations are performed for the period between 1951 and 1998 using real forcing fields for sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric CO2 and RIVERSTRAHLER simulations for river carbon and nutrient loads. Model results suggest that the BCZ shifted from a source of CO2 before 1970 (low eutrophication) towards a sink during the 1970–1990 period when anthropogenic DIN and P loads increased, stimulating C fixation by autotrophs. In agreement, a shift from net annual heterotrophy towards autotrophy in BCZ is simulated from 1980. The period after 1990 is characterized by a progressive decrease of P loads concomitant with a decrease of primary production and of the CO2 sink in the BCZ. At the end of the simulation period, the BCZ ecosystem is again net heterotroph and acts as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. R-MIRO-CO2 scenarios testing the relative impact of temperature, wind speed, atmospheric CO2 and river loads variability on the simulated air–sea CO2 fluxes suggest that the trend in air–sea CO2 fluxes simulated between 1951 and 1998 in the BCZ was mainly controlled by the magnitude and the ratio of inorganic nutrient river loads. Quantitative nutrient changes control the level of primary production while qualitative changes modulate the relative contribution of diatoms and Phaeocystis to this flux and hence the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhanced ocean carbon storage from anaerobic alkalinity generation in coastal sediments
Thomas, H.; Schiettecatte, L.-S.; Suykens, Kim ULg et al

in Biogeosciences (2009), 6

The coastal ocean is a crucial link between land, the open ocean and the atmosphere. The shallowness of the water column permits close interactions between the sedimentary, aquatic and atmospheric ... [more ▼]

The coastal ocean is a crucial link between land, the open ocean and the atmosphere. The shallowness of the water column permits close interactions between the sedimentary, aquatic and atmospheric compartments, which otherwise are decoupled at long time scales ( =1000 yr) in the open oceans. Despite the prominent role of the coastal oceans in absorbing atmospheric CO2 and transferring it into the deep oceans via the continental shelf pump, the underlying mechanisms remain only partly understood. Evaluating observations from the North Sea, a NW European shelf sea, we provide evidence that anaerobic degradation of organic matter, fuelled from land and ocean, generates total alkalinity (AT) and increases the CO2 buffer capacity of seawater. At both the basin wide and annual scales anaerobic AT generation in the North Sea’s tidal mud flat area irreversibly facilitates 7–10%, or taking into consideration benthic denitrification in the North Sea, 20–25% of the North Sea’s overall CO2 uptake. At the global scale, anaerobic AT generation could be accountable for as much as 60% of the uptake of CO2 in shelf and marginal seas, making this process, the anaerobic pump, a key player in the biological carbon pump. Under future high CO2 conditions oceanic CO2 storage via the anaerobic pump may even gain further relevance because of stimulated ocean productivity. [less ▲]

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See detailDistribution, origin and cycling of carbon in the Tana River (Kenya): a dry season basin-scale survey from headwaters to the delta
Bouillon, S.; Abril, G.; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

in Biogeosciences (2009), 6

The Tana River basin (TRB) is the largest in Kenya (_120 000 km2). We conducted a survey during the dry season throughout the TRB, analyzing a broad suite of biogeochemical parameters. Biogeochemical ... [more ▼]

The Tana River basin (TRB) is the largest in Kenya (_120 000 km2). We conducted a survey during the dry season throughout the TRB, analyzing a broad suite of biogeochemical parameters. Biogeochemical signatures in headwater streams were highly variable. Along the middle and lower river course, total suspended matter (TSM) concentrations increased more than 30-fold despite the absence of tributary inputs, indicating important resuspension events of internally stored sediment. These resuspended sediment inputs were characterized by a lower and 14C-depleted OC content, suggesting selective degradation of more recent material during sediment retention. Masinga Dam (a large reservoir on the upper river) induced a strong nutrient retention (_50% for inorganic N, _72% for inorganic phosphate, and _40% for dissolved silicate). Moreover, while DOC pools and _13C signatures were similar above, in and below the reservoir, the POC pool in Masinga surface waters was dominated by 13C-depleted phytoplankton, which contributed to the riverine POC pool immediately below the dam, but rapidly disappeared further downstream, suggesting rapid remineralization of this labile C pool in the river system. Despite the generally high turbidity, the combination of relatively high oxygen saturation levels, low _18O signatures of dissolved O2 (all <+24.2‰), and the relatively low pCO2 values suggest that in-stream primary production was significant, even though pigment data suggest that phytoplankton makes only a minor contribution to the total POC pool in the Tana River. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanisms controlling the air-sea CO2 flux in the North Sea
Prowe, F. A. E.; Thomas, H.; Pätsch, J. et al

in Continental Shelf Research (2009), 29

The mechanisms driving the air–sea exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the North Sea are investigated using the three-dimensional coupled physical–biogeochemical model ECOHAM (ECOlogical model, HAMburg ... [more ▼]

The mechanisms driving the air–sea exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the North Sea are investigated using the three-dimensional coupled physical–biogeochemical model ECOHAM (ECOlogical model, HAMburg). We validate our simulations using field data for the years 2001–2002 and identify the controls of the air–sea CO2 flux for two locations representative for the North Sea’s biogeochemical provinces. In the seasonally stratified northern region, net CO2 uptake is high (2:06molm 2 a 1) due to high net community production (NCP) in the surface water. Overflow production releasing semi labile dissolved organic carbon needs to be considered for a realistic simulation of the low dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations observed during summer. This biologically driven carbon drawdown outcompetes the temperature-driven rise in CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) during the productive season. In contrast, the permanently mixed southern region is a weak net CO2 source (0:78molm 2 a 1). NCP is generally low except for the spring bloom because remineralization parallels primary production. Here, the pCO2 appears to be controlled by temperature. [less ▲]

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See detailIberian Margin: The Rias
Álvarez–Salgado, X. A.; Borges, Alberto ULg; Figueiras, F. G. et al

in Carbon and Nutrient Fluxes in Continental Margins (2009)

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See detailInfluence of giant kelp beds (Macrocystis pyrifera) on diel cycles of pCO2 and DIC in the Sub-Antarctic coastal area
Delille, Bruno ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg; Delille, Daniel

in Estuarine Coastal & Shelf Science (2009), 81

The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were monitored in shallow coastal waters located inside and outside giant kelp beds (Macrocystis pyrifera) located in the Kerguelen ... [more ▼]

The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were monitored in shallow coastal waters located inside and outside giant kelp beds (Macrocystis pyrifera) located in the Kerguelen Archipelago (Southern Ocean). Photosynthesis and respiration by microplankton and kelp lead to marked pCO2 and DIC diel cycles. Daily variations of pCO2 and DIC are significant in the spring and summer, but absent in the winter, reflecting the seasonal cycle of biological activity in the kelp beds. If the kelp beds seem to favour the onset of phytoplankton blooms, most of the primary production inside the kelp beds is due to the kelp itself. The primary production of Macrocystis kelp beds in the Sub-Antarctic high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters off the Kerguelen Archipelago is elevated and closely linked to light availability. This production is significant from October to March and reaches its climax in December at the solar radiation maximum. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon cycling in the mixolimnion of Lake Kivu (East Africa)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Descy, J.-P.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailSeasonal variability of carbon dioxide and methane in the rivers and lagoons of Ivory Coast (West Africa)
Koné, Y. J. M.; Abril, G.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailCarbon cycling in the mixolimnion of Lake Kivu (East Africa)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Descy, J.-P.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailCarbon cycling in the mixolimnion of Lake Kivu (East Africa)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Descy, J.-P.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailThe Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) - Coastal Regional group
Borges, Alberto ULg; Chen, A. T. C.; The SOCAT Regional group

Poster (2009)

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