References of "Borges, Alberto"
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See detailThe internal consistency of the North Sea carbonate system
Salt, Lesley A.; Thomas, Helmuth; Bozec, Yann et al

in Journal of Marine Systems (2016), 157

Abstract In 2002 (February) and 2005 (August), the full suite of carbonate system parameters (total alkalinity (AT), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH, and partial pressure of \{CO2\} (pCO2) were ... [more ▼]

Abstract In 2002 (February) and 2005 (August), the full suite of carbonate system parameters (total alkalinity (AT), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH, and partial pressure of \{CO2\} (pCO2) were measured on two re-occupations of the entire North Sea basin, with three parameters (AT, DIC, pCO2) measured on four additional re-occupations, covering all four seasons, allowing an assessment of the internal consistency of the carbonate system. For most of the year, there is a similar level of internal consistency, with \{AT\} being calculated to within ± 6 μmol kg− 1 using \{DIC\} and pH, \{DIC\} to ± 6 μmol kg− 1 using \{AT\} and pH, pH to ± 0.008 using \{AT\} and pCO2, and pCO2 to ± 8 μatm using \{DIC\} and pH, with the dissociation constants of Millero et al. (2006). In spring, however, we observe a significant decline in the ability to accurately calculate the carbonate system. Lower consistency is observed with an increasing fraction of Baltic Sea water, caused by the high contribution of organic alkalinity in this water mass, not accounted for in the carbonate system calculations. Attempts to improve the internal consistency by accounting for the unconventional salinity–borate relationships in freshwater and the Baltic Sea, and through application of the new North Atlantic salinity–boron relationship (Lee et al., 2010), resulted in no significant difference in the internal consistency. [less ▲]

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See detailSTAtion of Reference and rEsearch on Change of local and global Anthropogenic Pressures on Mediterranean Ecosystems Drifts: The STARECAPMED project
Richir, Jonathan ULg; Abadie, Arnaud ULg; Binard, Marc ULg et al

Conference (2015, November 08)

The Marine and Oceanographic Research Station STARESO in the Calvi Bay, Corsica (France), is a unique tool in a preserved natural site that includes all the characteristic ecosystems of the Mediterranean ... [more ▼]

The Marine and Oceanographic Research Station STARESO in the Calvi Bay, Corsica (France), is a unique tool in a preserved natural site that includes all the characteristic ecosystems of the Mediterranean littoral. The station, established in 1970, has archived environmental data for decades. The STARECAPMED project, multidisciplinary, articulates itself around these two main features. Its objective is to understand how human activities can interact with the fundamental processes that govern the functioning of the different coastal ecosystems of a Mediterranean bay. The understanding of these interactions involves: (i) the identification of the anthropogenic pressures; (ii) the quantification of their impacts on the ecosystems; (iii) the prioritization of these impacts. STARECAPMED also aims to confirm the relevance of the use of the Calvi Bay as a reference in the study of local and global pressures and the changes they may cause on the structure and the functioning of Mediterranean coastal ecosytems. [less ▲]

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See detailDivergent biophysical controls of aquatic CO2 and CH4 in the World’s two largest rivers
Borges, Alberto ULg; Abril, G; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2015), 5

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters are globally significant and mainly occur at tropical latitudes. However, processes controlling the intensity of CO2 and CH4 emissions from tropical ... [more ▼]

Carbon emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters are globally significant and mainly occur at tropical latitudes. However, processes controlling the intensity of CO2 and CH4 emissions from tropical inland waters remain poorly understood. Here, we report a data-set of concurrent measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and dissolved CH4 concentrations in the Amazon (n = 136) and the Congo (n = 280) Rivers. The pCO2 values in the Amazon mainstem were significantly higher than in the Congo, contrasting with CH4 concentrations that were higher in the Congo than in the Amazon. Large-scale patterns in pCO2 across different lowland tropical basins can be apprehended with a relatively simple statistical model related to the extent of wetlands within the basin, showing that, in addition to non-flooded vegetation, wetlands also contribute to CO2 in river channels. On the other hand, dynamics of dissolved CH4 in river channels are less straightforward to predict, and are related to the way hydrology modulates the connectivity between wetlands and river channels. [less ▲]

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See detailPelagic photoferrotrophy and iron cycling in a modern ferruginous basin
Llirós, Marc; García–Armisen, Tamara; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2015), 5

Iron-rich (ferruginous) ocean chemistry prevailed throughout most of Earth’s early history. Before the evolution and proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, biological production in the ferruginous ... [more ▼]

Iron-rich (ferruginous) ocean chemistry prevailed throughout most of Earth’s early history. Before the evolution and proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, biological production in the ferruginous oceans was likely driven by photoferrotrophic bacteria that oxidize ferrous iron {Fe(II)} to harness energy from sunlight, and fix inorganic carbon into biomass. Photoferrotrophs may thus have fuelled Earth’s early biosphere providing energy to drive microbial growth and evolution over billions of years. Yet, photoferrotrophic activity has remained largely elusive on the modern Earth, leaving models for early biological production untested and imperative ecological context for the evolution of life missing. Here, we show that an active community of pelagic photoferrotrophs comprises up to 30% of the total microbial community in illuminated ferruginous waters of Kabuno Bay (KB), East Africa (DR Congo). These photoferrotrophs produce oxidized iron {Fe(III)} and biomass, and support a diverse pelagic microbial community including heterotrophic Fe(III)-reducers, sulfate reducers, fermenters and methanogens. At modest light levels, rates of photoferrotrophy in KB exceed those predicted for early Earth primary production, and are sufficient to generate Earth’s largest sedimentary iron ore deposits. Fe cycling, however, is efficient, and complex microbial community interactions likely regulate Fe(III) and organic matter export from the photic zone. [less ▲]

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See detailRegional occurence of greenhouses gases in groundwater: Initial results in shallow Belgian aquifers.
Hakoun, Vivien ULg; Gesels, Julie ULg; Tseng, Jean Hsiao-Chun et al

Poster (2015, September)

Currently, the lack of robust, context-distributed subsurface greenhouses gases (GHG) concentrations data is a key bottleneck to reduce the uncertainty range of GHG groundwater input to continental ... [more ▼]

Currently, the lack of robust, context-distributed subsurface greenhouses gases (GHG) concentrations data is a key bottleneck to reduce the uncertainty range of GHG groundwater input to continental surface water bodies such as rivers or lakes estimates. Carbon dioxyde (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxyde (N2O) are likely to be indirectly transferred to the atmosphere through groundwater discharge into continental surface water bodies. We aim to extend regional-scale estimates of indirect GHG emissions by screening, in numerous hydrogeological (such as alluvial, sandstone, chalk and limestone aquifers) and land use contexts (such as industrial and agricultural), the occurence of these gases. Here, we report and discuss CO2, CH4 and N2O concentrations from an initial survey conducted over selected sites (n= 40) within shallow (0-100 m depth) aquifers in Wallonia (Belgium) for the first time. The preliminary results obtained in this study show that the range of GHG concentrations varies between 5160 and 47544 ppm, 0 and 1064 nmol.L-1, as well as 1 and 5637 nmol.L-1 for the partial pressure of CO2, CH4 and N2O respectively. This new and unique regional dataset provides a first step in developping a refined understanding of favorable contexts for GHG occurence in groundwater which may be used to reduce the uncertainties related to indirect emissions of GHG through groundwater-surface water transfers. [less ▲]

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See detailRiver geochemistry, chemical weathering, and atmospheric CO2 consumption rates in the Virunga Volcanic Province (East Africa)
Balagizi, Charles M.; Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, Steven et al

in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (2015), 16

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See detailContribution of cyanobacteria to the building of travertines in a calcareous stream
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Golubic, Stjepko; Kleinteich, Julia et al

Poster (2015, August 03)

The ambient temperature travertine deposits of the calcareous Hoyoux River (Modave, Belgium) and several tributaries are organized and promoted by the filamentous cyanobacterium identified by its ... [more ▼]

The ambient temperature travertine deposits of the calcareous Hoyoux River (Modave, Belgium) and several tributaries are organized and promoted by the filamentous cyanobacterium identified by its morphotype and ecological properties as Phormidium cf. incrustatum. A combination of techniques was used to study this biotope: physico-chemical parameters and CO2 measurements, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, RAMAN microspectroscopy. A molecular diversity study with pyrosequencing of the cyanobacterial 16S rRNA is in progress. A potential candidate was isolated in culture. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobally significant greenhouse-gas emissions from African inland waters
Borges, Alberto ULg; Darchambeau, François ULg; Teodoru, Cristian R. et al

in Nature Geoscience (2015), advance online publication

Carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters[mdash]streams, rivers, lakes and reservoirs[mdash]are nearly equivalent to ocean and land sinks globally. Inland waters can be an important ... [more ▼]

Carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from inland waters[mdash]streams, rivers, lakes and reservoirs[mdash]are nearly equivalent to ocean and land sinks globally. Inland waters can be an important source of methane and nitrous oxide emissions as well, but emissions are poorly quantified, especially in Africa. Here we report dissolved carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide concentrations from 12 rivers in sub-Saharan Africa, including seasonally resolved sampling at 39 sites, acquired between 2006 and 2014. Fluxes were calculated from published gas transfer velocities, and upscaled to the area of all sub-Saharan African rivers using available spatial data sets. Carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions from river channels alone were about 0.4 Pg carbon per year, equivalent to two-thirds of the overall net carbon land sink previously reported for Africa. Including emissions from wetlands of the Congo river increases the total carbon dioxide-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions to about 0.9 Pg carbon per year, equivalent to about one quarter of the global ocean and terrestrial combined carbon sink. Riverine carbon dioxide and methane emissions increase with wetland extent and upland biomass. We therefore suggest that future changes in wetland and upland cover could strongly affect greenhouse-gas emissions from African inland waters. [less ▲]

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See detailPRESSÃO PARCIAL (PCO2) E FLUXO DE DIÓXIDO DE CARBONO (CO2) EM AMBIENTES DE VÁRZEA AMAZÔNICOS
Amaral, JHF; Barbosa; Kasper, D et al

Conference (2015, July 12)

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See detailMethane distributions and sea-to-air fluxes in the South China Sea and the West Philippines Sea
Tseng; Chen; Borges, Alberto ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 07)

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See detailPhytoplankton abundance and diversity in the Congo river at high and low waters
Stoyneva, MP; Descy, JP; Bouillon, S et al

Conference (2015, July 05)

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See detailSTARECAPMED (STAtion of Reference and rEsearch on Change of local and global Anthropogenic Pressures on Mediterranean Ecosystems Drifts) - Année 2014. Rapport de recherches.
Richir, Jonathan ULg; Abadie, Arnaud ULg; Binard, Marc ULg et al

Report (2015)

La prise de conscience, par le grand public, de l'impact grandissant de l'homme sur l'océan est récente. Elle se traduit par une volonté politique sincère de correction par des mesures de protection, de ... [more ▼]

La prise de conscience, par le grand public, de l'impact grandissant de l'homme sur l'océan est récente. Elle se traduit par une volonté politique sincère de correction par des mesures de protection, de gestion et de développement durable. Ces politiques, et leurs conséquences économiques et sociétales lourdes, ne peuvent être acceptées que si les décisions se fondent sur des connaissances scientifiques incontestables et montrent des résultats scientifiquement prouvés. Par ailleurs, ces décisions doivent prendre en compte des impacts qui s'opèrent à des échelles de temps et d’espace très variables, de quelques heures à plusieurs dizaines d’années et de quelques mètres à plusieurs milliers de km. En termes politiques, l'information scientifique nécessaire à la prise de décision doit pouvoir couvrir les différentes échelles depuis le niveau local et régional, jusqu'à l'échelle nationale, européenne voire globale, et cela sur le plus long terme possible. Enfin, pour être complète, l'information scientifique sur les écosystèmes marins doit pouvoir répondre à trois questions objectives : (i) quel est l'état? (ii) quelle est l'évolution? (iii) quels sont les mécanismes et processus mis en jeux? et à une question plus prospective : (vi) que peux-t-on prévoir et comment agir? Le présent rapport ne peut pas, à lui seul, refléter toute la richesse du programme STARECAPMED. En 3 ans, STARECAPMED a généré plusieurs centaines de milliers de données nouvelles, ré-exploité plusieurs centaines de publications, rapports et autres enregistrements passés et présents. Le programme a aussi généré de nombreux documents, rapports et mémoires. Enfin, des publications internationales et des thèses de doctorat sont en cours de réalisation ou abouties. Afin de rester lisible, nous avons donc choisi de présenter ce rapport 2014 sous la forme de 12 exemples parmi les travaux en cours. Ces exemples sont traités selon un schéma identique en 4 points simples : (i) La présentation du cas d’étude dans le projet global ; (ii),Les approches innovatrices développées ; (iii),La présentation de résultats marquants ; (iv),Les délivrables de STARECAPMED pour les politiques publiques. [less ▲]

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See detailLandscape Control on the Spatial and Temporal Variability of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter and Dissolved Organic Carbon in Large African Rivers
Lambert, Thibault ULg; Darchambeau, François ULg; Bouillon, Steven et al

in Ecosystems (2015)

The characteristics of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as the concentrations and stable isotope composition (d 13 C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were characterized in several large ... [more ▼]

The characteristics of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as the concentrations and stable isotope composition (d 13 C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were characterized in several large rivers of Africa including the Congo, Niger, Zambezi, and Ogooué basins. We compared the spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality along with various environmental gradients, including hydrology, river size, catchment vegetation, and connectivity to land. The optical proxies used include the absorption coefficient at 350 nm, the specific ultraviolet absorbance, and the spectral slope ratio (S R = 275–295-nm slope divided by 350–400-nm slope). Our results show that land cover plays a primary role in controlling both DOC concentration and optical properties of DOM in tropical freshwaters. A higher cover of dense forest in the catchment leads to a higher quantity of highly aromatic DOM in the river network, whereas an increasing savannah cover results in lower DOC concentrations and less absorptive DOM. In addition to land cover, the watershed morphology (expressed by the average slope) exerts a strong control on DOC and CDOM in tropical rivers. Our results also show that the percentage of C3 and C4 vegetation cover is not an accurate predictor for DOM and CDOM quality in rivers due to the importance of the spatial distribution of land cover within the drainage network. The comparison of our results with previously published CDOM data in temperate and high-latitude rivers highlights that DOM in tropical freshwa-ters is generally more aromatic, and shows a higher capacity for absorbing sunlight irradiance. [less ▲]

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See detailVertical Distribution of Functional Potential and Active Microbial Communities in Meromictic Lake Kivu
İnceoğlu, Özgul; Llirós, Marc; Crowe, Sean A. et al

in Microbial Ecology (2015)

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See detailHow phosphorus limitation can control climatic gas emission
Gypens; Borges, Alberto ULg; Speeckaert, Gaëlle ULg et al

Conference (2015, April 12)

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See detailOrganic and inorganic carbon fluxes in a tropical river system (Tana River, Kenya) during contrasting wet seasons
Geeraert, N; Omengo, FO; Bouillon, S et al

Poster (2015, April 12)

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See detailDimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) cell quota of key Southern North Sea spring diatoms and Phaeocystis globosa
Speeckaert, Gaëlle ULg; Gypens, Nathalie; Lancelot, Christiane et al

Poster (2015, April)

Dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the ocean results of complex transformations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) produced by phytoplankton under different controls, including microbial transformation pathways ... [more ▼]

Dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the ocean results of complex transformations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) produced by phytoplankton under different controls, including microbial transformation pathways. The phytoplankton composition is an important factor of variability due to the species dependence of the DMSP production and conversion to DMS. To better appraise the link between phytoplankton diversity and the DMS(P) cycling in the Southern North Sea we present measurements of the DMSP cell quota of key spring phytoplankton species (Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira rotula, Rhizosolenia delicatula, Asterionella glacialis, Nitzschia closterium, Chaetoceros debilis, Chaetoceros socialis and Phaeocystis globosa) isolated from the North Sea and maintained in non-limiting and axenic laboratory culture conditions. Results are discussed with regards to literature data and hypothesis currently used in DMS(P) biogeochemical models. [less ▲]

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See detailApplications of stable isotopes in environmental studies at the University of Liege
Sturaro, Nicolas ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg; Das, Krishna ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 26)

Measurement and use of stable isotope ratios have a long history at the University of Liege (Belgium). Since at least 30 years, applications of stable isotopes in marine ecosystems have been developed ... [more ▼]

Measurement and use of stable isotope ratios have a long history at the University of Liege (Belgium). Since at least 30 years, applications of stable isotopes in marine ecosystems have been developed within the Laboratory of Oceanology and, more recently, within the Chemical Oceanography Unit. In the Laboratory of Oceanology, one research axis is the measurement of stable isotope composition (C, N, S) in organic matter to delineate trophic web structure and to study animal diet, their trophic niches and their alteration by human activities. This methodology has been successively applied worldwide in different habitats and ecosystems (marine, freshwater, terrestrial) in temperate and tropical areas. Mediterranean food web and fish trophic ecology have received a particular attention. Coupling between trophic ecology and ecotoxicology is another area of investigation. This has been applied mainly to marine vertebrates and freshwater ecosystems. Stable isotope labelling is also used in our laboratory to study and quantify various ecological processes such as inorganic nitrogen incorporation and trophic transfers. The laboratory facilities, renewed in 2012 and managed by Dr. Gilles Lepoint, are composed of an elemental analyser (EA, vario MICRO cube, Elementar) and a gas chromatography (GC, Agilent) coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS, Isoprime 100). The GC is also equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In 2014, the Chemical Oceanography Unit, headed by Dr. Alberto Borges, has acquired and implemented an off-axis cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for the measurements of δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O of N2O. This enables characterization of the N2O origin in a variety of aquatic environments including groundwater in Wallonia, rivers and lakes in Wallonia and Africa, coastal environments (Scheldt estuary, Lake Grevelingen, North Sea), Mediterranean seagrass beds, and Antarctic and Arctic sea-ice. [less ▲]

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See detailInorhanic and organic carbon spatial variability in the Congo River during high waters (December 2013) and low waters (June 2014)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Bouillon, S; Teodoru, C et al

Conference (2015, February 23)

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See detailBiogeochemistry of the Congo River: annual transport fluxes and sources of carbon in the upper Congo River (Kisangani, DRC Congo)
Bouillon; Tambwe; Mambo, T et al

Conference (2015, February 22)

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