References of "Boonen, S"
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See detailLa gestione post-frattura del paziente con frattura di femore: Una visione prospettica
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Brandi, M. L.; Burlet, N. et al

in Clinical Cases in Mineral and Bone Metabolism (2009), 6(3), 270-279

[No abstract available]

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See detailManagement of patients with Paget's disease: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club.
Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Bergmann, Pierre; Body, Jean-Jacques et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008), 19(8), 1109-17

Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a potentially crippling condition. Pain, fracture, spinal stenosis, nerve entrapment, vascular steal syndrome, secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformity, dental problems ... [more ▼]

Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a potentially crippling condition. Pain, fracture, spinal stenosis, nerve entrapment, vascular steal syndrome, secondary osteoarthritis, bone deformity, dental problems, deafness, excessive bleeding during orthopaedic surgery, rare sarcomatous degeneration, and hypercalcaemia constitute complications that may impair the quality of life. The therapeutic approach varies from symptomatic (analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs) to more specific drugs such as increasingly potent bisphosphonates. Studies such as the PRISM study should in the future help to determine the superiority or not of aggressive treatment over symptomatic treatment in the prevention of complications. Various oral and/or intravenous (i.v.) bisphosphonates have been tested and are currently on the market. The most recently available nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, i.v. zoledronic acid, is the most potent therapy available for the treatment of PDB. Its therapeutic efficacy, its long-term effect on biologic activity and its good tolerance currently supports its use as a first-line therapeutic option in patients suffering from PDB. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of calcium and vitamin D in the management of osteoporosis.
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M. L. et al

in BONE (2008), 42(2), 246-9

The role of calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of osteoporosis has been extensively studied. The aim of this paper was to reach, where possible, consensus views on five key questions ... [more ▼]

The role of calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of osteoporosis has been extensively studied. The aim of this paper was to reach, where possible, consensus views on five key questions relating to calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the management of osteoporosis. Whereas global strategies that target supplementation to the general population could not be justified in terms of efficacy and health economics, there is a clearer rationale for supplementing patients who are at increased risk of osteoporosis and those who have developed osteoporosis, including those already taking other treatments for osteoporosis. The combination of vitamin D with calcium may be beneficial in terms of efficacy and, perhaps, for optimising adherence. [less ▲]

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See detailPost-fracture management of patients with hip fracture: a perspective.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Brandi, M.-L.; Burlet, N. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2008), 24(10), 2841-51

BACKGROUND: Hip fracture creates a worldwide morbidity, mortality and economic burden. After surgery, many patients experience long-term disability or die as a consequence of the fracture. A fracture is a ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Hip fracture creates a worldwide morbidity, mortality and economic burden. After surgery, many patients experience long-term disability or die as a consequence of the fracture. A fracture is a major risk factor for a subsequent fracture, which may occur within a short interval. METHODS: A literature search on post-fracture management of patients with hip fracture was performed on the Medline database. Key experts convened to develop a consensus document. FINDINGS: Management of hip-fracture patients to optimize outcome after hospital discharge requires several stages of care co-ordinated by a multidisciplinary team from before admission through to discharge. Further studies that specifically assess prevention and post-fracture management of hip fracture are needed, as only one study to date has assessed an osteoporosis medication in patients with a recent hip fracture. Proper nutrition is vital to assist bone repair and prevent further falls, particularly in malnourished patients. Vitamin D, calcium and protein supplementation is associated with an increase in hip BMD and reduction in falls. Rehabilitation is essential to improve functional disabilities and survival rates. Fall prevention and functional recovery strategies should include patient education and training to improve balance and increase muscle strength and mobility. Appropriate management can prevent further fractures and it is critical that high-risk patients are identified and treated. To foster this process, clinical pathways have been established to support orthopaedic surgeons. CONCLUSION: Although hip fracture is generally associated with poor outcomes, appropriate management can ensure optimal recovery and survival, and should be prioritized after a hip fracture to avoid deterioration of health and prevent subsequent fracture. [less ▲]

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See detailVápník a vitamin D v léčbě osteoporózy
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M. L. et al

in Ceska Revmatologie (2007), 15(3), 153-156

[No abstract available]

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See detailLe calcium et la vitamine D dans la prise en charge de l'ostéoporose
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M. L. et al

in Journal de Gynécologie, Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction (2007), 36(6), 615-617

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See detailManagement of cancer treatment-induced bone loss in early breast and prostate cancer -- a consensus paper of the Belgian Bone Club.
Body, Jean-Jacques; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2007), 18(11), 1439-50

Cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is one of the most important side effects of adjuvant antineoplastic treatment in hormone-dependent neoplasms. Chemotherapy, GnRH analogs and tamoxifen can ... [more ▼]

Cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is one of the most important side effects of adjuvant antineoplastic treatment in hormone-dependent neoplasms. Chemotherapy, GnRH analogs and tamoxifen can induce marked bone loss in premenopausal women with early breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are replacing tamoxifen as the preferred treatment for postmenopausal women. As a class effect, steroidal (exemestane) and non-steroidal (anastrozole and letrozole) AIs increase bone turnover and cause bone loss (4%-5% over 2 years). When compared to tamoxifen, the risk of getting a clinical fracture under AI treatment is increased by 35%-50%. In patients with prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) increases bone turnover, reduces bone mass (4%-5% per year) and increases the fracture rate depending on the duration of therapy. Zoledronic acid can prevent accelerated bone loss induced by goserelin in premenopausal women, by letrozole in postmenopausal women and by ADT in men. More limited data indicate that weekly alendronate or risedronate could also be effective for preventing CTIBL. Initiation of therapy early, prior to the occurrence of severe osteoporosis, rather than after, may be more effective. Bisphosphonate treatment should be considered in osteoporotic but also in osteopenic patients if other risk factor(s) for fractures are present. [less ▲]

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See detailDual energy X-ray absorptiometry-based assessment of male patients using standardized bone density values and a national reference database
Goemaere, S.; Vanderschueren, D.; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Journal of Clinical Densitometry (2007), 10(1, JAN-MAR), 25-33

Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements from different manufacturers provide different bone mineral density (BMD) values and derived T-scores and Z-scores. These differences result partly from ... [more ▼]

Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements from different manufacturers provide different bone mineral density (BMD) values and derived T-scores and Z-scores. These differences result partly from technical differences in the algorithms for the determination of bone mineral content and bone area and partly from the use of different manufacturer-derived reference databases. The present study was to implement a uniforrn expression of BNID in all male patients by using standardized BMD (sBMD) values and referring to a newly established national male reference sample. In 8 bone densitometry centers throughout Belgium 229 young healthy men were measured on Hologic (Bedford, MA) or GE-Lunar (Madison, WI) bone densitometers. Quality control procedures were implemented and site cross-calibration performed using the European Spine Phantom. Absolute BMD values were converted to standardized values by validated formulas (sBMD). Clinically acceptable between-center differences were noted. No discrepancy was observed in terms of mean sBMD and standard deviations at the lumbar spine and proximal femur between the Belgian and the US reference populations. Region-specific sBMD thresholds for the diagnosis of male osteoporosis were calculated. The current data provide a basis to implement a nation-wide, uniform expression of BMD in male patients and allow harmonization of the BMD-based diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in men. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in women eighty years of age and older
Seeman, E.; Vellas, B.; Benhamou, C. L. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2006), 21(7), 1113-1120

Introduction: About 25-30% of the population burden of all fragility fractures in the community arise from women >= 80 years of age, because this population is at high risk for all types of fracture ... [more ▼]

Introduction: About 25-30% of the population burden of all fragility fractures in the community arise from women >= 80 years of age, because this population is at high risk for all types of fracture, particularly nonvertebral fractures. Despite this, evidence that therapies reduce the risk of both vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in this group is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine whether strontium ranelate, an agent that reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in postmenopausal women > 50 years of age, also reduces fractures in the elderly. Materials and Methods: An analysis based on preplanned pooling of data from two international, phase 111, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies (the Spinal Osteoporosis, Therapeutic Intervention [SOTI] and TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis [TROPOS]) included 1488 women between 80 and 100 years of age followed for 3 years. Yearly spinal X-rays were performed in 895 patients. Only radiographically confirmed nonvertebral fractures were included. Results: Baseline characteristics did not differ in placebo and treatment arms. In the intent-to-treat analysis, the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and clinical (symptomatic vertebral and nonvertebral) fractures was reduced within I year by 59% (p = 0.002), 41% (p = 0.027), and 37% (p = 0.012), respectively. At the end of 3 years, vertebral, nonvertebral, and clinical fracture risks were reduced by 32% (p = 0.013), 31% (p = 0.011), and 22% (p = 0.040), respectively. The medication was well tolerated, and the safety profile was similar to that in younger patients. Conclusions: Treatment with strontium ranelate safely reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in women with osteoporosis >= 80 years of age. Even in the oldest old, it is not too late to reduce fracture risk. [less ▲]

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See detailAddressing the musculoskeletal components of fracture risk with calcium and vitamin D: A review of the evidence
Boonen, S.; Bischoff-Ferrari, H. A.; Cooper, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2006), 78(5), 257-270

Osteoporotic fractures are an extremely common and serious health problem in the elderly. This article presents the rationale for calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of ... [more ▼]

Osteoporotic fractures are an extremely common and serious health problem in the elderly. This article presents the rationale for calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of osteoporotic fractures and reviews the literature evidence on the efficacy of this strategy. Two musculoskeletal risk factors are implicated in osteoporotic fractures in the elderly: the loss of bone mass due to secondary hyperparathyroidism and the increased propensity to falls. Calcium and vitamin D reverse secondary hyperparathyroidism with resultant beneficial effects on bone mineral density (BMD). Additionally, calcium and vitamin D supplementation significantly improves body sway and lower extremity strength, reducing the risk of falls. The effects of combined calcium and vitamin D on parathyroid function and BMD provide a strong rationale for the use of this therapy in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. There is general agreement that, in patients with documented osteoporosis, calcium and vitamin D supplementation should be an integral component of the management strategy, along with antiresorptive or anabolic treatment. Frail elderly individuals constitute another major target population for calcium and vitamin D because evidence from randomized studies in institutionalized elderly subjects demonstrates that these supplements reduce osteoporotic fracture risk, particularly in the presence of dietary deficiencies. However, the results of trials in community-dwelling subjects have been equivocal. Within the primary-care setting, further research is required to establish appropriate target subgroups for calcium and vitamin D supplementation; overall, the data are consistent with a benefit individuals with insufficient calcium and/or vitamin D, although patients with documented osteoporosis will derive further benefit in terms of fracture prevention from the addition of an antiresorptive agent. [less ▲]

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See detailDXA-based assessment of male patients using standardized bone density values and a national reference database
Goemaere, S.; Vanderschueren, D.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 54

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See detailBelgian bone specialists are eagerly looking to the availability of new medications in osteoporosis
Goemaere, S.; Bergmann, P.; Body, J. J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 27

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See detailEvidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club
Devogelaer, J. P.; Goemaere, S.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006), 17(1), 8-19

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently prescribed for various inflammatory and/or life-threatening conditions concerning many systems in the body. However, they can provoke many aftereffects, of which ... [more ▼]

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently prescribed for various inflammatory and/or life-threatening conditions concerning many systems in the body. However, they can provoke many aftereffects, of which osteoporosis (OP) is one of the most crippling complications, with its host of fractures. The dramatic increase in bone fragility is mainly attributable to the GC-induced rapid bone loss in all skeletal compartments. We have reviewed the meta-analyses and randomized controlled studies reporting medical therapeutic interventions currently registered in Belgium for the management of GC-OP comparatively with a placebo. Based on this research, an expert meeting developed a consensus on the prevention and therapy of GC-OP. The pathophysiology of GC-OP is complex. Several factors, acting separately or synergistically, have been described. Their great number could help to understand the rapidity of bone loss and of bone fragility occurrence, indicating that a rapid therapeutic intervention should be implemented to avoid complications. All patients on GCs are threatened with OP, so the prevention and/or therapy of GC-OP should be considered not only for postmenopausal females, but also for osteopenic premenopausal females and for males put on a daily dose of at least 7.5 mg equivalent prednisolone that is expected to last at least 3 months. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as exercise and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol, should be recommended, even if their role is not definitely settled in GC-OP prevention. Supplemental calcium and vitamin D should be considered as the first-line therapy because of the decrease in intestinal calcium absorption provoked by GCs. They also could be considered either as isolated therapy in patients taking less than 7.5 mg prednisolone daily and/or for a predicted period shorter than 3 months or as adjuvant therapy to other more potent drugs. Hormone replacement therapy could be considered in young postmenopausal females on GC, such as in postmenopausal OP, or in men with low androgen levels. Calcitonin appears to have a protective effect on trabecular bone in GC-OP, just as in postmenopausal OP. There is an increasing body of evidence supporting the antifracture efficacy of bisphosphonates, notably alendronate and risedronate. Preventative and curative therapy of GC-OP should be maintained as long as the patient is on GC treatment and could be stopped after weaning from GC, because there is more than circumstantial evidence of some recovery of BMD when GCs are stopped. There is no indication in GC-OP for any combination of two antiresorptive agents (except for calcium and vitamin D) or for an antiresorptive and an anabolic agent. There is indeed no proof that the increased costs of combined treatments will translate into increased therapeutic efficacy. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence-based guidelines for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: a consensus document of the Belgian Bone Club
Boonen, S.; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boutsen, Y. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005), 16(3), 239-254

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See detailThe need for clinical guidance in the use of calcium and vitamin D in the management of osteoporosis: a consensus report
Boonen, S.; Rizzoli, R.; Meunier, P. J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2004), 15(7), 511-519

A European Union (EU) directive on vitamins and minerals used as ingredients of food supplements with a nutritional or physiological effect (2002/46/EC) was introduced in 2003. Its implications for the ... [more ▼]

A European Union (EU) directive on vitamins and minerals used as ingredients of food supplements with a nutritional or physiological effect (2002/46/EC) was introduced in 2003. Its implications for the use of oral supplements of calcium and vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis were discussed at a meeting organized with the help of the World Health Organization ( WHO) Collaborating Center for Public Health Aspects of Rheumatic Diseases (Liege, Belgium) and the support of the WHO Collaborating Center for Osteoporosis Prevention (Geneva, Switzerland). The following issues were addressed: Is osteoporosis a physiological or a medical condition? What is the evidence for the efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis? What are the risks of self-management by patients in osteoporosis? From their discussions, the panel concluded that: (1) osteoporosis is a disease that requires continuing medical attention to ensure optimal therapeutic benefits; (2) when given in appropriate doses, calcium and vitamin D have been shown to be pharmacologically active (particularly in patients with dietary deficiencies), safe, and effective for the prevention and treatment of osteoporotic fractures; (3) calcium and vitamin D are an essential, but not sufficient, component of an integrated management strategy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with dietary insufficiencies, although maximal benefit in terms of fracture prevention requires the addition of antiresorptive therapy; (4) calcium and vitamin D are a cost-effective medication in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; (5) it is apparent that awareness of the efficacy of calcium and vitamin D in osteoporosis is still low and further work needs to be done to increase awareness among physicians, patients, and women at risk; and (6) in order that calcium and vitamin D continues to be manufactured to Good Manufacturing Practice standards and physicians and other health care professionals continue to provide guidance for the optimal use of these agents, they should continue to be classified as medicinal products. [less ▲]

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See detailPatient assessment using standardized bone mineral density values and a national reference database: implementing uniform thresholds for the reimbursement of osteoporosis treatments in Belgium
Boonen, S.; Kaufman, J. M.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003), 14(2), 110-115

Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) devices from the three main manufacturers provide different bone mineral density (BMD) values, due in part to technical differences in the algorithms for bone ... [more ▼]

Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) devices from the three main manufacturers provide different bone mineral density (BMD) values, due in part to technical differences in the algorithms for bone mineral content (BMC) and area measurements and in part to the use of different manufacturer-derived reference databases. As a result, significant differences exist between Hologic, Lunar and Norland systems in the reported young normal standard deviation scores or T-scores. In a number of European countries, including Belgium, a T-score below -2.5 is one of the key criteria for reimbursement of osteoporosis treatments. This paper addresses the first attempt to implement a nationwide, uniform expression of BMD in patients, in order to harmonize drug reimbursement. To this end, measures were taken to implement a uniform expression of BMD in Belgian patients, by converting each manufacturer's absolute BMD to standardized BMD (sBMD) values and by establishing a single national reference range. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of a screening program for postmenopausal osteoporosis in primary care setting in Belgium
Goemare, S.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; De Bacquer, D. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002, November), 13(Suppl.3), 39

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See detailL'osteoporose involutive de la femme: strategie therapeutique. Un point de vue actualise du Belgian Bone Club.
Kaufman, J M; Body, J J; Boonen, S et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2000), 55(5), 443-8

Osteoporosis is now considered as a major public health issue and a serious threat for the quality of life of elderly women. Several new compounds are currently marketed for the prevention and treatment ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis is now considered as a major public health issue and a serious threat for the quality of life of elderly women. Several new compounds are currently marketed for the prevention and treatment of involutional osteoporosis in women. Therefore, it is important to offer to the practitioners pragmatic solutions to be used for the rational management of this disorder. This article is the result of a national consensus offering practical guidelines for the management of osteoporotic patients, based on the current published data. [less ▲]

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