References of "Bolen, Géraldine"
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See detailA study of the caeco-colic vessels and lymph nodes at equine transabdominal ultrasonography
Evrard, Laurence ULg; Esmans, Maya; Etienne, Anne-Laure ULg et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (2012)

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See detailIMAGING FINDINGS IN HORSES WITH PHARYNGEAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULg; Evrard, Laurence ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

Poster (2012)

Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been occasionally reported in the equine pharyngeal region1-3. The aim of this poster is to describe imaging findings in 4 cases of pharyngeal SCC. Material ... [more ▼]

Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been occasionally reported in the equine pharyngeal region1-3. The aim of this poster is to describe imaging findings in 4 cases of pharyngeal SCC. Material and methods Four old horses, mean age 19.5, 2 females and 2 geldings, were referred for dyspnea (3/4) and/or dysphagia (3/4). Because of dyspnea radiographs were realized prior to endoscopy. Ultrasound (US) was performed in all cases by ventral and lateral approach using a linear 7,5MHz transducer. A post-mortem computed tomography (CT) of the head was performed in one case (16 slices CT, Somatom 16, Siemens). Results Radiographic opacity of the pharyngeal region was increased in all cases. A soft tissue mass was also visible in the caudal maxillary sinus in 1 horse. The epiglottis was either not recognized or difficult to see with an abnormal shape. Pharyngoepiglottic distance and nasopharyngeal diameter were reduced in all cases. The soft palate was either thick or impossible to be outlined, with an irregular surface. In 1 case it was dorsally displaced. The dorsal pharyngeal wall looked unevenly thickened or impossible to be outlined ventrally due to border effacement. No bony damage was identified on radiographs. A hypoechoic heterogeneous mass was visualized at US in 2 cases and an enlargement of the mandibular lymph nodes was observed in 3 cases. Lymphnodes had also heterogeneous echogenicity and increased doppler signal in 1 case. Oral and pharyngeal endoscopic examination confirmed a pharyngeal mass in 2 cases but was unsuccessful or incomplete because of passage impairment in 2. CT revealed maxillary bone lysis in the horse with a mass in the maxillary sinus. Histopathological examination of local biopsies or necropsy revealed pharyngeal SCC invading epiglottis, pharyngeal wall and soft palate in the 4 horses and the maxillary sinus in one. Discussion/Conclusion Because endoscopy can be impaired by the size of the mass, radiology is helpful in estimating the extent and invasiveness of the process and US to confirm lymphadenopathy. However because of its relatively low sensitivity and the local increased opacity, radiographic examination may underestimate bone lysis. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of successive freezing-thawing cycles on 3-T magnetic resonance images of the digits of isolated equine limbs
Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Haye, Dimitri; Dondelinger, Robert ULg et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2011), 72(6), 780-790

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of freezing and thawing on MR images of equine feet examined ex vivo. Nine equine cadaver digits were first imaged at room temperature (T0). Among the 9 ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of freezing and thawing on MR images of equine feet examined ex vivo. Nine equine cadaver digits were first imaged at room temperature (T0). Among the 9 digits, 3 (group 1) were imaged in a 3 Tesla MR system after one and after 2 freezing-thawing cycles. Digits of group 1 were thawed in a cold room at 4°C for 36h. Three other digits (group 2) were imaged after one freezing-thawing cycle. Digits of group 2 were thawed in a cold room at 4°C and then rescanned after 24h at room temperature. The last 3 digits (group 3) were scanned after one freezing-thawing cycle. Digits of group 3 were thawed at room temperature for 24h. Sequences used were Spin Echo (SE) T1, Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) T2 and proton density (PD), Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR), Double Echo Steady State (DESS), 3D Gradient Echo (GE) T1 and 2D GE T2*. Images obtained on the fresh limbs at room temperature were subjectively compared side by side to images obtained at the different freezing-thawing cycles. A quantitative analysis to assess signal change between examinations was realized by measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR). Visibility and margination of the anatomical structures of the foot and overall image quality were subjectively considered unchanged except for the hoof where the lamina was considered less visible distally after freezing and thawing in the GE T2* and in TSE T2 and PD sequences. Quantitative analysis demonstrated SNR changes in the bone marrow only in the distal phalanx in the SE T1 sequence when the feet were thawed at room temperature. When the feet were thawed in a cold room at 4°C, bone marrow SNR changes were present in the SE T1, GE T1 and TSE PD sequences. Signal changes were significant in the synovial recess when the thawing process was made at 4°C and not when the thawing process was at ambient temperature. The soft tissue structures and the hoof capsule showed significant changes with an increase of SNR, except in STIR, after freezing and thawing at 4°C and at room temperature. SNR changes in the soft tissues were mainly present in GE sequences. [less ▲]

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See detailIdiopathic central diabetes insipidus and severe hypernatremia in a cat
Desmas, Isabelle ULg; Manens, Jefferson ULg; Rizza, Maïlis et al

Poster (2011, January 22)

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See detailContribution of CT scan for lesions affecting the spine
Deudon, Pauline ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg; Balligand, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2011, January 22)

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See detailMettalic foreign body in a horse: case report
Evrard, Laurence ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Gougnard, Alexandra ULg et al

Poster (2011, January 22)

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See detailUltrasonographic findings in horses with foot pain but without radiographically detectable osseous abnormalities
Rabba, Silvia ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (2011), 52(1), 95-102

Foot pain is an important cause of lameness in horses. When horses with foot pain have no detectable radiographic abnormalities, soft-tissue assessment remains a diagnostic challenge without magnetic ... [more ▼]

Foot pain is an important cause of lameness in horses. When horses with foot pain have no detectable radiographic abnormalities, soft-tissue assessment remains a diagnostic challenge without magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Ultrasonography can provide an alternative to MR imaging when that modality is not available but the extent of changes that might be seen has not been characterized. We reviewed the ultrasonographic findings in 39 horses with lameness responding positively to anesthesia of the palmar digital nerves and without radiographically detectable osseous abnormalities. Thirty of the 39 horses had lesions affecting the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT), 27 had abnormalities in the distal interphalangeal joint of which six had a visible abnormality in the collateral ligament. Ultrasonographic abnormalities were seen in the podotrochlear bursa in 22 horses and in the ligaments of the navicular bone in two horses. Abnormalities of the navicular bone flexor surface were detected in eight horses. In three of the 39 horses, only the DDFT was affected. The other 36 horses had ultrasonographic abnormalities in more than one anatomical structure. Based on our results, ultrasonographic examination provides useful diagnostic information in horses without radiographic changes. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary experience of a modified Maquet technique for repair of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs
Etchepareborde, Sébastien; Brunel, Laurencie ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2011)

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See detailUltrasonographic findings in horses with foot pain but without radiographically detectable osseous abnormalities
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Rabba, Silvia ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

Conference (2010, December 06)

US diagnosis of soft tissue damage in the foot was possible in cases where radiographic diagnosis was unsuccessful. US offers an easily available diagnostic tool for an evaluation of the digital soft ... [more ▼]

US diagnosis of soft tissue damage in the foot was possible in cases where radiographic diagnosis was unsuccessful. US offers an easily available diagnostic tool for an evaluation of the digital soft tissues and may decrease the need for MRI when this modality is difficult to apply. [less ▲]

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See detailComputed Tomographic Features of Choanal Atresia in a Friesian Foal
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2010), 30(8), 436-440

A 3 week old Friesian foal colt was presented with a history of respiratory distress since birth. Endoscopy showed obstruction of the right nasal passage to the nasopharynx. Computed tomography (CT) was ... [more ▼]

A 3 week old Friesian foal colt was presented with a history of respiratory distress since birth. Endoscopy showed obstruction of the right nasal passage to the nasopharynx. Computed tomography (CT) was performed to further characterize this unilateral blockage: images showed demonstrated a complete membranous obstruction of the ventral meatus, together with a deviation of the vomer bone to the left. The diagnosis of unilateral choanal atresia was confirmed. This is the first report describing CT features of choanal atresia in a foal. [less ▲]

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See detailWhats your diagnosis: fragmentation of the proximal tubercle of the talus
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Paindavaine, Pierre et al

in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association [=JAVMA] (2010), 1(237),

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See detailQualitative comparison of 0.27T, 1.5T and 3T Magnetic Resonance Images of the normal equine foot.
Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Audigié, Fabrice; Spriet, Mathieu et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2010), 30(1), 9-20

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the investigation of foot pain in horses. The aim of this study was to qualitatively compare ex-vivo MR images of the same equine ... [more ▼]

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the investigation of foot pain in horses. The aim of this study was to qualitatively compare ex-vivo MR images of the same equine feet obtained at three magnetic field strengths: 0.27, 1.5, and 3 tesla (T). Ten cadaver feet were used. All feet were imaged with two high-field (HF) systems (3T, 1.5T) and with a low-field (LF) system at 0.27T designed for standing horses. Images were acquired using similar pulse sequences in all 3 MR units. MR images were subjectively evaluated by three independent experienced image analysts for image quality and clarity of visualization of individual anatomical structures using a four-point grading scale. The images from all of the examinations were considered to be of diagnostic value except for the hoof capsule where substantial artifacts were present in LF images with distortion and loss of signal at the dorsal/distal aspect of the hoof capsule in LF images. Anatomical structure scoring values of images obtained at 3T and 1.5T were significantly greater than scores of images obtained at 0.27T. Scores for images obtained at 3T were significantly higher than those for images obtained at 1.5T. Mean score differences between 1.5T and 3T were higher for cartilage of the distal interphalangeal joint and for the ungular cartilages. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetic resonance signal changes during time in equine limbs refrigerated at 4 degrees C.
Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Haye, Dimitri; Dondelinger, Robert ULg et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (2010), 51(1), 19-24

When ex vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies are undertaken, specimen conservation should be taken into account when interpreting MR imaging results. The purpose of this study was to assess MR ... [more ▼]

When ex vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies are undertaken, specimen conservation should be taken into account when interpreting MR imaging results. The purpose of this study was to assess MR changes during time in the anatomic structures of the equine digit on eight cadaver limbs stored at 4 degrees C. The digits were imaged within 12 h after death and then after 1, 2, 7, and 14 days of refrigeration. After the last examination, four feet were warmed at room temperature for 24 h and reimaged. Sequences used were turbo spin echo (TSE) T1, TSE T2, short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and double-echo steady state (DESS). Images obtained were compared subjectively side by side for image quality and signal changes. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured and compared between examinations. There were no subjective changes in image quality. A mild size reduction of the synovial recesses was detected subjectively. No signal change was seen subjectively except for bone marrow that appeared slightly hyperintense in STIR and slightly hypointense in TSE T2 sequence after refrigeration compared with day 0. Using quantitative analysis, significant SNR changes in bone marrow of refrigerated limbs compared with day 0 were detected in STIR and TSE T2 sequences. Warming at room temperature for 24 h produced a reverse effect on SNR compared with refrigeration with a significant increase in SNR in TSE T2 images. After 14 days of refrigeration a statistically significant decrease of SNR was found in bone marrow in TSE T2 and DESS sequences. The SNR in the deep digital flexor tendon was not characterized by significant change in SNR. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of radiographic findings in candidate sires (2001-2008)
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg; Pille, Frederik et al

in Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift (2009), 78

Radiographic screening of horses prior to purchase or admission to studbooks has become an important tool for evaluating the osteo-articular status of the animals. Developmental orthopedic disorders (DOD ... [more ▼]

Radiographic screening of horses prior to purchase or admission to studbooks has become an important tool for evaluating the osteo-articular status of the animals. Developmental orthopedic disorders (DOD) are the main cause of potential lameness in youngsters. The genetic factor associated with DOD has been established, and specific selection schemes have been developed to diminish the prevalence of lesions. Increasing knowledge of prevalence in different breeds may help in developing specific breeding strategies. This article presents the results of the radiographic screening of 676 stallions presented for sire admission to the Royal Belgian Sports Horse Society (Studbook sBs). On average, two radiographic findings were noted per horse. The prevalence of DOD in this population was 38.9%. A high percentage of horses showed radiographic signs of effusion of the distal interphalangeal joint. An uncommon fragment location at the proximal tubercle of the talus was found in 7 horses. The present paper presents a review and discussion of all the radiographic findings. [less ▲]

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