References of "Bodson, Bernard"
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See detail2. Implantation des cultures
Eylenbosch, Damien ULg; Meza Morales, Walter ULg; Monfort, Bruno et al

in Watillon, Bernard; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2015, February 25)

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See detailLivre Blanc Céréales
Watillon, Bernard ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg

Book published by Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech - Edition février 2015 (2015)

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See detailWildflower strips for crop protection: What do we know ? What should we know ?
Hatt, Séverin ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 30)

Wildflower strips (WFS) are known to support the conservation of a large diversity of insects and thus natural enemies (i.e. predators and parasitoids) that can control pests. However, the conclusions of ... [more ▼]

Wildflower strips (WFS) are known to support the conservation of a large diversity of insects and thus natural enemies (i.e. predators and parasitoids) that can control pests. However, the conclusions of studies looking at the efficiency of WFS to control pests are not unanimous. Indeed, the enhancement of pest control seems to depend on (1) the ability of flowers to attract the natural enemies at the right moment and (2) the capacity of natural enemies to migrate into the adjacent crops to attack pests. Therefore, constituting appropriate flower mixes may be an essential lever to enhance the efficiency of pest control. In this context, using functional diversity is promising. To our knowledge, few studies have tested the impact of the functional diversity of a flower mix on insect abundance and diversity and the control of pests. Through this contribution, the insect diversity and abundance found to be associated with the different kinds of WFS and management applied will be discussed, as well as the further research needed. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of cover crop management on sugar beet production
Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg

Poster (2015, January 30)

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See detailA novel sub-phylum method discriminates better the impact of crop management on soil microbial community
Degrune, Florine ULg; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

in Agronomy for Sustainable Development (2015)

Soil microorganisms such as mycorrhizae and plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria have beneficial effects on crop productivity. Agricultural practices are known to impact soil microbial communities, but ... [more ▼]

Soil microorganisms such as mycorrhizae and plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria have beneficial effects on crop productivity. Agricultural practices are known to impact soil microbial communities, but past studies examining this impact have focused mostly on one or two taxonomic levels, such as phylum and class, thus missing potentially relevant information from lower levels. Therefore we propose here an original, sub-phylum method for studying how agricultural practices modify microbial communities. This method involves exploiting the available sequence information at the lowest taxonomic level attainable for each operational taxonomic unit. In order to validate this novel method we assessed microbial community composition using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S and 28S rRNA genes, then we compared the results with results of a phylum-level analysis. Agricultural practices included conventional tillage, reduced tillage, residue removal and residue retention. Results show that, at the lowest taxonomic level attainable, tillage is the main factor influencing both bacterial community composition, accounting for 13% of the variation, and fungal community composition, accounting for 18% of the variation. Whereas phylum-level analysis failed to reveal any effect of soil practice on bacterial community composition, and missed the fact that different members of the same phylum responded differently to tillage practice. For instance, the fungal phylum Chytridiomycota showed no impact of soil treatment, while sub-phylum-level analysis revealed an impact of tillage practice on the Chytridiomycota sub-groups Gibberella, which includes a notorious wheat pathogen, and Trichocomaceae. This clearly demonstrates the necessity of exploiting the information obtainable at sub-phylum level when assessing the effects of agricultural practice on microbial communities. [less ▲]

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See detailDo wildflower strips favor insect pest populations at field margins ?
Hatt, Séverin ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULg et al

in Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia (2015)

Reducing pesticide use is one the major issues of today’s agriculture. Among other possibilities, attracting and conserving pest natural enemies in agricultural landscapes by providing them habitats is ... [more ▼]

Reducing pesticide use is one the major issues of today’s agriculture. Among other possibilities, attracting and conserving pest natural enemies in agricultural landscapes by providing them habitats is promising. Wildflower strips (WFS) sown at field margins are one of these potential habitats. They are known to attract and conserve a large diversity of insects, as they provide them food resources such as pollen and nectar, as well as shelter and overwintering sites. However, the risk of attracting insect pests at field margins may represent an obstacle to their adoption by farmers. Conversely, it would be interesting if such WFS could play the role of pest trap crops. In an experimental field sown with WFS intercropped with oilseed rape (OSR) (Brassica napus L.), its coleopteran pests were trapped in both WFS and OSR using yellow pan traps between April and June 2014. More than 130 000 Meligethes spp., Ceutorhynchus spp. and Psylliodes chrysocephalla (L.) adults were trapped. Meligethes spp., Ceutorhynchus spp. were significantly more abundant in the OSR compared with WFS when adults emerged and populations reached their abundance peak. Before and between these periods, the few adults trapped were significantly more abundant in the WFS compared with the OSR. Concerning P. chrysocephala, too few individuals were caught for analysis. Results showed that OSR was more attractive than WFS when coleopteran pests were abundant. In this study, WFS sown for insect conservation may neither favour insect pest conservation at field margin, nor be considered as trap crops. [less ▲]

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See detailCREATING PERENNIAL FLOWER STRIPS: THINK FUNCTIONAL!
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Hatt, Séverin ULg; Piqueray, Julien et al

in Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia (2015), 6

In last decades, farmland biodiversity came under large threat. To counteract farmland biodiversity loss and other environmental impacts of intensive agriculture, European farmers can apply Agri ... [more ▼]

In last decades, farmland biodiversity came under large threat. To counteract farmland biodiversity loss and other environmental impacts of intensive agriculture, European farmers can apply Agri-environmental schemes. One of these is the creation of flower strips, a part of the cropping field where flowers are sown or naturally settled. Flower strips are known to increase biodiversity in the agricultural landscape, notably attracting specific insects groups, such as pollinators and natural enemies that can provide valuable pollination and biocontrol services to the crop. However, the plant species composition and management of the strips can have a large influence on the identity and amount of useful insects present in the strips, suggesting the need to develop tailored flower strips to maximize the services delivered. Functional diversity (FD) is sometimes proposed as a promising approach, focusing on plant functional traits rather than plant species itself. Yet, it is not certain that sowing a set of plant species results in the desired vegetation with the desired functional trait composition. Species from soil seed bank or dispersing from neighboring vegetation can settle in the strip, while sown species might not always be equally adapted to local conditions. To test this, we developed seed mixtures with four different levels of FD, based on flower traits, and sew them as flower strips in a conventional arable field. We monitored the vegetation to calculate the FD of the realized vegetation. While the absolute FD values of the realized vegetation were lower than the expected FD values, the realized vegetation showed the same FD gradient as expected from the sown mixtures, indicating that it is possible to manipulate FD in flower strips. [less ▲]

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See detailThe saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae): population dynamics and integrated management
Censier, Florence ULg; De Proft, Michel; Bodson, Bernard ULg

in Crop Protection (2015)

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), is a European crop pest whose larvae feed on cereal stems. Severe damage has been observed in some countries since 2010, sometimes after several ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser), is a European crop pest whose larvae feed on cereal stems. Severe damage has been observed in some countries since 2010, sometimes after several decades without reports, renewing the interest of agronomists and entomologists in this sporadic pest. This review first focuses on the environmental factors influencing the life cycle of this pest and the damage it causes, as larval feeding can induce severe yield losses in the case of heavy infestation. This article also discusses the history of H. marginata outbreaks and hypotheses about its enigmatic population dynamics. This review finally presents the methods currently available to develop strategies for its integrated management. Precise monitoring of H. marginata populations appears to be an essential key to manage this pest and to understand the criteria leading to an outbreak. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes the cover crop residue management affect the soil water availability for plants?
Chelin, Marie ULg; Parvin, Nargish ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2014, December 05)

Hydraulic processes and soil storage capacity may be affected by the crop residue management. Thus, a better understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of water as a consequence of different ... [more ▼]

Hydraulic processes and soil storage capacity may be affected by the crop residue management. Thus, a better understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of water as a consequence of different tillage methods is needed. The distribution of soil water content is basically studied thanks to soil moisture sensors such as time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes. However, this method requires the disturbance of the soil and only provides local information. Comparatively, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) slightly alters the soil structure. It has been considered as a proxy to assess the spatial and temporal variability of the soil water content. This study aims at assessing whether and to which extent the crop residue management influences soil water dynamics and the water availability for maize. Water content will be monitored from March to October 2014, under three crop residue managements: conventional tillage realized in the end of autumn, conventional tillage realized just before sowing, and strip tillage. A bare soil under conventional tillage will also be monitored so as to better understand the influence of the plant over the growing season. So as to better understand the dynamics of water in the soil-water-continuum, the influence of the crop residue management on the soil structure and the plant development will also be investigated. The soil water pattern will be daily monitored on a surface of two square meters through surface stainless steel electrodes, corresponding to three rows of seven maize plants. Five additional sticks with buried electrodes will be setup to get more detailed information near to the maize row. For each of the monitored zone, two TDR probes will help validating the data. In order to calibrate the relationship between electrical resistivity and soil water content, a dig will be dug, in which a set of four electrodes, one TDR probe and one temperature sensor will be placed at four different depths. Two suction cups placed on each of the monitoring zone will help getting the electrical conductivity of the soil solution. [less ▲]

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See detailDetecting microbial patterns in relation to soil agricultural practices and the plant development stage
Degrune, Florine ULg; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2014, December 02)

Agricultural practices have a strong impact on soil bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, microbial community composition can change with the stage of plant development. We are interested in exploring these ... [more ▼]

Agricultural practices have a strong impact on soil bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, microbial community composition can change with the stage of plant development. We are interested in exploring these effects in relation to changes induced by agriculture and plant stage in soil conditions. Some bacteria are influenced only by the plant stage, which induces changes in soil humidity, pH, nitrates, and carbon. We would thus expect these bacteria to be highly sensitive to these parameters. Other bacteria are affected only by the tillage practice applied. Further study is needed to identify the soil parameters responsible for this effect. The plant stage also has a great impact on fungal community composition. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon balance of a grazed pasture and its response to grazing management
Jerome, Elisabeth ULg; Gourlez de la Motte, Louis ULg; Beckers, Yves et al

Poster (2014, September 24)

The C balance of a grazed pasture situated in Condroz (Wallonia) and its dependence on climatic conditions and grazing management were investigated on the basis of eddy covariance measurements and ... [more ▼]

The C balance of a grazed pasture situated in Condroz (Wallonia) and its dependence on climatic conditions and grazing management were investigated on the basis of eddy covariance measurements and horizontal C flow estimates. In average on three years, NEE was +43±24 gCm-2yr-1 and NBP was +7±26 gCm-2yr-1, suggesting that that the site is C neutral. Management by the farmer (organic fertilization), but also climate conditions influencing management (feed supplements), were the main factors impacting the C balance inter-annual variability. At a daily and seasonal scale, grazing impact on CO2 fluxes did not appear explicitly, being blurred by flux response to climate drivers. It was highlighted by specific investigations. The indirect grazing impact (photosynthesizing biomass consumption, excretions, soil compaction) was deduced from an analysis of the flux to PPFD response evolution during grazing period; the direct impact (livestock respiration) was investigated through confinement experiments. Result showed that saturation GPP changes were negatively correlated to grazing intensity (product of the stocking rate and grazing duration). On the contrary, no significant change in TER was observed. The direct impact of grazing due to cattle respiration was estimated to 2.59±0.58 kgCLU-1day-1, i.e. 8% of the TER. [less ▲]

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See detailAre agricultural ecosystems important BVOC « exchangers »? Evidences from 2 measurement years on croplands at Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (Belgium)
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

Poster (2014, September 23)

For the last decades, agricultural ecosystems have been a key biome for diverse socio-economical, environmental and climatic issues. And one of these climatic issues is just BVOC (Biogenic Volatile ... [more ▼]

For the last decades, agricultural ecosystems have been a key biome for diverse socio-economical, environmental and climatic issues. And one of these climatic issues is just BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) emission from terrestrial ecosystems. Indeed, those compounds which are mostly emitted by plants play a great role in the atmospheric chemistry, thereby influencing the Earth surface radiative budget and the tropospheric air quality. However, so far, very few is known about BVOC exchange by crops, implying that huge uncertainties remain about qualifying, quantifying and determining sources/sinks and driving mechanisms of BVOC exchanges between croplands ecosystems and the atmosphere. We present here the first long term BVOC fluxes measurement study conducted on maize (2012) and winter wheat (2013), respectively the second and first most important worldwide crops (FAOSTAT). BVOC exchange was measured using the disjunct by mass scanning eddy covariance technique (+ PTR-MS, Ionicon) at the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (ICOS site) in Belgium. Main results are: (i) crops emit mainly methanol; (ii) BVOC emission from studied crops is lower than in literature, suggesting that agricultural ecosystems are poor BVOC exchangers; (iii) soil is a significant BVOC source. [less ▲]

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See detail4. Qualité des froments en 2014: une récolte prometteuse et puis la douche froide
Sinnaeve, Georges; Gofflot, Sébastien; Chandelier, Anne et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2014, September 11)

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See detail2. Variétés - 2. Escourgeon et orge d'hiver fourragers
Monfort, Bruno; Mahieu, Olivier; Couvreur, Luc et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc céréales (2014, September 11)

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See detail2. Variétés - 1. Froment d'hiver
Meza Morales, Walter ULg; Couveur, Luc; Eylenbosch, Damien ULg et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2014, September 11)

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See detail1. Implantation des cultures
Eylenbosch, Damien ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg; Meza Morales, Walter ULg et al

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc - Céréales (2014, September 11)

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See detailLivre Blanc Céréales
Bodson, Bernard ULg; Destain, Jean-Pierre ULg

Book published by Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (2014)

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See detailDetection of wheat root and straw in soil by use of Near Infrared hyperspectral imaging system and Partial Least Square discriminant analysis
Eylenbosch, Damien ULg; Fernández Pierna, Juan Antonio; Baeten, Vincent et al

Poster (2014, August 26)

Monitoring of root systems development and crop residues decomposition is only possible if these constituents can be discriminated from soil and quantified. In this work, Near Infrared (NIR) combined with ... [more ▼]

Monitoring of root systems development and crop residues decomposition is only possible if these constituents can be discriminated from soil and quantified. In this work, Near Infrared (NIR) combined with Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) and Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) is proposed as a new rapid and reliable method to discriminate soil, roots and straws. NIR-HSI provides simultaneously spectral and spatial information and PLS-DA allows discrimination between classes based on spectra of each pixel linked to chemical nature of sample constituents on the image. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of biostimulant products on the growth of wheat and the microbial communities of its rhizosphere under contrasted production systems
Nguyen, Minh ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (2014, August 24)

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the major biostimulant classes due to their ability to stimulate root growth, enhance mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency in crops ... [more ▼]

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the major biostimulant classes due to their ability to stimulate root growth, enhance mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency in crops. PGPR-containing biostimulant products could therefore make agriculture more sustainable by reducing demand for chemical fertilizer and lessen their negative environmental impacts. The aim of this project is to screen PGPR strains to (1) enhance wheat fitness level (growth, photosynthesis efficiency, stress tolerance, and yield) in combination with an optimised fertilizer level, (2) stimulate the increase in beneficial microorganism communities and suppress pathogenic ones in the wheat rhizosphere, (3) link wheat productivity to the composition of the microbial communities found in its rhizosphere, and (4) measure the impacts of such changes on soil fertility. A list of PGPR-containing biostimulants have been collected from screening, including several commercially available products (e.g. TwinN and NitroGuard, Mabiotec; Rhizocell GC, Ithec; B. subtilis FZB24 fl and Rhizo Vital 42, Abitep) as well as newly discovered PGPR strains. The biostimulants from that list have been screened in greenhouse and we expect to obtain results within next month. In parallel, several levels of nitrogen supply have been tested in combination with biostimulants to optimize agricultural practices and achieve the highest yield on field condition. A soil analysis protocols will also be built up to measure the influence of those PGPR strains on soil fertility changes and root uptake efficiency. In order to assess changes in the rhizomicrobial communities including fungi and bacteria (either pathogenic, neutral, or beneficial) under controlled or field conditions, metagenomic approaches will be set up. Finally, a maximum of three promising PGPR strains will be selected for practical agronomical application in larger field trials. [less ▲]

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