References of "Blecker, Christophe"
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See detailImproving Sunflower Halva Stability and Texture by Controlling Tahini Particle Size Distribution
MUREȘAN, Vlad; CUIBUS, Lucian; OLARI, Anna et al

in Bulletin UASVM Food Science and Technology (2015), 72(1),

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See detailCrystallization behaviour of binary fat blends containing shea stearin as hard fat
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Delatte, Sophie; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

in European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology [=EJLST] (2015), 117

Filling fats are used in bakery and confectionery applications. These fats are made up of complex mixtures of triacylglycerols (TAG). The crystallization, melting behaviour and polymorphic stability of ... [more ▼]

Filling fats are used in bakery and confectionery applications. These fats are made up of complex mixtures of triacylglycerols (TAG). The crystallization, melting behaviour and polymorphic stability of fat blends are determined by the behaviour of the TAGs that they contain. Filling functionalities are influenced by their fat composition but also by the processing conditions used for crystallization. In this study, the crystallization behaviour of fat blends, all based on shea stearin as hard fat (which is high in 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol (SOS)) combined with either sunflower oil, shea olein or rapeseed oil, were investigated by means of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Blends containing either 30 or 40% shea stearin combined with one of the soft fats were selected as they met the criteria required for filling fats. Under static isothermal conditions (at 10°C, 15°C or 20°C), a two-step crystallization was observed for those blends, which can be explained by polymorphic transitions from a-form into more stable forms. All the selected blends exhibited different crystallization mechanisms according to theTAGcomposition of the liquid phase and their complementarity with TAG from the solid phase. [less ▲]

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See detailNon Digestible Oligosaccharides Modulate the Gut Microbiota to Control the Development of Leukemia and Associated Cachexia in Mice.
Bindels, Laure B.; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Salazar, Nuria et al

in PloS one (2015), 10(6), 0131009

We tested the hypothesis that changing the gut microbiota using pectic oligosaccharides (POS) or inulin (INU) differently modulates the progression of leukemia and related metabolic disorders. Mice were ... [more ▼]

We tested the hypothesis that changing the gut microbiota using pectic oligosaccharides (POS) or inulin (INU) differently modulates the progression of leukemia and related metabolic disorders. Mice were transplanted with Bcr-Abl-transfected proB lymphocytes mimicking leukemia and received either POS or INU in their diet (5%) for 2 weeks. Combination of pyrosequencing, PCR-DGGE and qPCR analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that POS decreased microbial diversity and richness of caecal microbiota whereas it increased Bifidobacterium spp., Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides spp. (affecting specifically B. dorei) to a higher extent than INU. INU supplementation increased the portal SCFA propionate and butyrate, and decreased cancer cell invasion in the liver. POS treatment did not affect hepatic cancer cell invasion, but was more efficient than INU to decrease the metabolic alterations. Indeed, POS better than INU delayed anorexia linked to cancer progression. In addition, POS treatment increased acetate in the caecal content, changed the fatty acid profile inside adipose tissue and counteracted the induction of markers controlling beta-oxidation, thereby hampering fat mass loss. Non digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties may constitute a new nutritional strategy to modulate gut microbiota with positive consequences on cancer progression and associated cachexia. [less ▲]

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See detailDes insectes au menu: apports protéiques et nutriments particuliers?
Caparros Megido, Rudy ULg; Alabi, Taofic ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

in 56èmes Journées Nationales de Diététique et de Nutrition (2015)

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See detailStructural Characterization, Technological Functionality and Physiological Aspects of Fungal β-D-Glucans : A Review
Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem et al

in Critical Reviews in Food Science & Nutrition (2015)

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See detailEffect of enzymatic treatment on rheological properties, glass temperature transition and microstructure of date syrup
Abbès, Fatma; Masmoudi, Manel; Kchaou, Wissal et al

in LWT - Food Science and Technology (2015), 60

A knowledge of rheological properties is of importance in processing, handling, process design, product development and quality control. This study investigates the effect of commercial hydrolytic enzymes ... [more ▼]

A knowledge of rheological properties is of importance in processing, handling, process design, product development and quality control. This study investigates the effect of commercial hydrolytic enzymes (pectinase and cellulase) on rheological properties and glass temperature transition of date syrup. Date syrups obtained by enzymatic extraction exhibited a quasi Newtonian behaviour. The enzyme-treated date syrups showed the highest values of activation energy (Ea). Therefore, these syrups showed the most temperature dependency. Dynamic shear results revealed viscous behaviour for date syrups indicating that both syrups displayed liquid-like behaviour. Temperature significantly affected both (G') and (G''). The glass transition temperature (Tg) of date syrups varied between -39.56 and -45.74 °C depending on their composition. Glass transition temperature of date syrups decreased linearly with an increase in water content. [less ▲]

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See detailRoasted Sunflower Kernel Paste (Tahini) Stability: Storage Conditions and Particle Size Influence
Muresan, Vlad; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Bolboaca, Sorana D. et al

in Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society (2015)

Sunflower tahini faces quality problems due to the tendency of oil to exudate, causing accelerated rancidity and low marketability. In this study, the colloidal and oxidative stability of different ... [more ▼]

Sunflower tahini faces quality problems due to the tendency of oil to exudate, causing accelerated rancidity and low marketability. In this study, the colloidal and oxidative stability of different trimodal particle size distributions of sunflower tahini (cumulative volume percentages of small, middle and large class populations of 9.61–16.67, 43.03–55.03 and 47.36–28.3) was evaluated during storage at three different temperatures. Decreasing sample particle size decreased the sunflower tahini colloidal stability. The coarsest prototype, being the most stable tahini in terms of oil separation, was included in the oxidative stability storage test together with a commercial tahini. The peroxide values of the studied sunflower tahini samples increased significantly (p < 0.05) with storage time, irrespective of storage temperature, while the p-anisidine values showed an irregular pattern. Considering 30-meq O2/kg as a PV limit, the commercial tahini showed good oxidative stability as it was under this when stored 3 months at 4 °C, 2 months at room temperature and 1 month a 40 °C. The coarsest tahini sample was under the limit when stored 2 months at 4 °C, 1 month at room temperature and 2 weeks at 40 °C. Particle size was shown to be an essential parameter for controlling sunflower tahini’s overall stability. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical composition and functional properties of dietary fibre extracted by Englyst and Prosky methods from the alga Ulva lactuca collected in Tunisia
Yaich, Hela; Garna, Haikel; Bchir, Brahim et al

in Algal Research (2015), 9

Nowadays there is a growing trend to find new sources of dietary fibre (DF), such as marine algae by-products that have traditionally been undervalued. In this respect, the aim of the present ... [more ▼]

Nowadays there is a growing trend to find new sources of dietary fibre (DF), such as marine algae by-products that have traditionally been undervalued. In this respect, the aim of the present investigation was firstly to compare two methods of dietary fibre quantification (Englyst and Prosky) and secondly to determine the chemical composition and some of the functional properties of total and insoluble fibres extracted in accordance with the Englyst method. The dietary fibres of dried Ulva lactuca collected from the Tunisian littoral were determined by the Prosky (gravimetric method) and Englyst (enzymatic-chemical method) methods. The two extraction methods (Englyst–Prosky) provided approximately the same values in total fibres (~54%). However, they had different insoluble and soluble fibre contents. U. lactuca contained 20.53% and 31.55% of soluble fibres and 34.37% and 21.54% of insoluble fibres using the Prosky and Englyst methods, respectively. The fractionation of the insoluble dietary fibre concentrate revealed that hemicellulose was the most abundant fraction (32.49%), followed by cellulose (16.59%) and “lignin-like” compounds (1.53%). For both fibre concentrates, the main neutral sugar was glucose (20.70%–27.59%), which corresponded to hemicellulose and cellulose. The water holding capacity of insoluble fibre concentrate was relatively high. It varied between 9.32 g and 10.3 g of water/g of dry fibre at 25 °C and 80 °C, respectively. Nevertheless, the oil holding capacity of the insoluble fibre concentrate was not affected by temperature. It was about 1.08 and 1.01 g of oil/g of dry fibre at 25 °C and 80 °C. Despite the significant functional properties of fibre concentrate, the presence of lead limits its use as an ingredient in the food industry. [less ▲]

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See detailP180: Intérêt de la modulation du microbiote intestinal par les oligosaccharides non digestibles dans le contrôle de la leucémie et de la cachexie cancéreuse
Bindels, L.B.; Neyrinck, A.M.; Salazar, N. et al

in Nutrition Clinique et Metabolisme (2014, December), 28(S1), 162

Il est à présent clairement établi que l’ensemble des bactéries présentes dans l’intestin (le microbiote intestinal) est capable d’influencer l’homéostasie énergétique et immunitaire de son hôte. Nous ... [more ▼]

Il est à présent clairement établi que l’ensemble des bactéries présentes dans l’intestin (le microbiote intestinal) est capable d’influencer l’homéostasie énergétique et immunitaire de son hôte. Nous avons testé l’hypothèse selon laquelle une modulation du microbiote intestinal par des oligosaccharides issus de la pectine (POS) ou de l’inuline (INU) permet d’interférer avec la progression de la leucémie et des désordres métaboliques associés. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of 13C-NMR in structural elucidation of polysaccharides: case of locust bean gum
Gillet, Sébastien ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2014, November 25)

Locust bean gum (LBG) galactomannans are polysaccharides consisting of a β-(1→4) D-mannopyranosyl backbone substituted to varying degrees in α-(1→6) with single D-galactopyranosyl residues. This basic ... [more ▼]

Locust bean gum (LBG) galactomannans are polysaccharides consisting of a β-(1→4) D-mannopyranosyl backbone substituted to varying degrees in α-(1→6) with single D-galactopyranosyl residues. This basic structure is the same for all galactomannans (Fig. 2). However, when locust bean gum is extracted at different temperatures, the generated fractions exhibit different properties in aqueous solution (viscosity, viscoelasticity, gel formation, thermohydrolysis resistance, etc.). This means that there are differences within the fine structure of the polymers (although the basic structure is the same). Analysis of [13C]-NMR spectra of galactomannans, in combination with other techniques, can provide capital information about fine structural elucidation of the polymers. The method specifies the distribution of lateral galactosyls along the main chain of mannans. Two fractions extracted from locust bean gum at 25 and 80 °C (respectively GM25 and GM80) were comparatively studied by [13C]-NMR. Mannosyls/Galactosyls (M/G) ratios can be determined by considering the intensities of C-1 mannose and galactose signals in [13C]-NMR spectra. This method provides results relatively close to those obtained by GC-MS analysis. Spectra also showed that resonance from C4 of D-mannose residues were split, in evident dependence upon the nearest-neighbor probabilities (“diad frequencies”) of D-galactosyl groups along the mannan chains (Fig. 2). Diad frequencies were obtained by integrating C4(Man) peak areas. F11, F21/F12 and F22 gave respectively the di-, mono- or non-substituted mannose pairs proportions. High percentages of F11 and F22 therefore indicate a more non-homogeneous distribution of lateral galactosyls along the polysaccharide backbone as observed for GM80. The percentages of total lateral substituents obtained by C4(Man) peak analysis [F11 + (F21 or F12)/2] were fairly well correlated with M/G ratios. Splitting of the C-6 substituted D-mannose resonance provides, therefore the basis for determining the next-nearest-neighbor probabilities (triad frequencies) (Fig. 2). However, the spectrum is often not sufficiently resolved to accurately quantify and interpret the results. [less ▲]

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See detailTexture and Stability of Sunflower Halva Produced from Different Particle Size Tahini
Mureșan, Vlad; Cuibus, Lucian; Olari, Anna et al

Conference (2014, September 26)

The aim of this work was to assess the influence of tahini particle size on sunflower halva texture ans stability.

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See detailLe secret des crèmes foisonnées
Petrut, Raul Flaviu ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg

Poster (2014, September 26)

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See detailCrystallization behaviour of binary fat blends containing shea stearin as hard fat
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Delatte, S; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 15)

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See detailInvestigation of the thermal and structural behavior of two lauric fats in bulk and oil-in-water emulsion states
Petrut, Raul Flaviu ULg; Anihouvi, Prudent Placide; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2014, September 14)

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See detailBatch enzymatic interesterification of fat blends using microwave
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Simon, C.; Richel, Aurore ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

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See detailMealworms: Alternate Source of Lipids
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Paul, Aman ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, May 16)

The aim of present study was to determine the physicochemical properties of the oil obtained from Tenebrio molitor larvae (mealworms) and explore its potential as edible oil. Five batches of Tenebrio ... [more ▼]

The aim of present study was to determine the physicochemical properties of the oil obtained from Tenebrio molitor larvae (mealworms) and explore its potential as edible oil. Five batches of Tenebrio molitor larvae were investigated for their lipid content and physiochemical properties. Three batches were reared in lab (3 different productions) and two were purchased from a local supplier. The lipids were extracted using a cold extraction technique employing 2:1 ratio chloroform/methanol as solvent. The fatty acid profile was determined using gas chromatography and triacylglycerol profile using HPLC. The thermal properties of the lipid extracts were also analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry. All the samples contained high amount of unsaturated fatty acids. The chemical composition and the thermal properties of the samples varied with the source. With this quantity and quality of lipid content, mealworms offer potential as an important source of edible lipids. [less ▲]

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See detailBelgian Grasshoppers: A Nutritious Food Source
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 14)

Rapid urbanization and rising economies are creating shifts in the composition of global food demand, so it is necessary to explore new sources of food with better nutritional profile. Among the ... [more ▼]

Rapid urbanization and rising economies are creating shifts in the composition of global food demand, so it is necessary to explore new sources of food with better nutritional profile. Among the alternative food that exists are the grasshoppers, about 80 species of which are consumed worldwide. Grasshoppers are not only rich source of proteins and lipids but also some important minor component like vitamins and minerals. Edible species of grasshopper in Belgium were identified and attempts were made for the lab rearing of meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus). The lipids as well as protein contents of meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) & long winged conehead (Conocephalus discolor) were investigated. The fatty acid compositions of these two species were determined by gas chromatography. Some of the physicochemical properties of the lipids extracted were also analyzed. These two grasshopper species could be really nutritious source of food. [less ▲]

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See detailLocusts and Grasshoppers: Future Foods?
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, May 08)

Consuming locusts and grasshoppers as food is not a new concept, because some people have been doing it for a long time and there are many references in the religious literature to support this. About 80 ... [more ▼]

Consuming locusts and grasshoppers as food is not a new concept, because some people have been doing it for a long time and there are many references in the religious literature to support this. About 80 locust and grasshopper species are consumed worldwide, and the large majority of grasshopper species are edible. From the nutritional point of view they are an excellent source of proteins, lipids and other minor components like vitamins and minerals. They are an excellent source of amino acids and their lipids contain a large majority of unsaturated fatty acids. Environmentalists have supported human consumption of grasshoppers owing to the facts that they usually appear as pests. Using them as food could help reduce their population and result in limited application of harmful pesticides. Their production usually generates lesser amount of greenhouse gases & ammonia; a lower amount of water is required for their production in comparison to conventional proteins sources. Some species of grasshoppers usually feed on dead organic matter, this reduces the environmental load. In the developing world, catching of grasshoppers and selling them for human consumption has played a key role in improving the livelihood of women and underprivileged children. Eating grasshopper and locust is not a very common practice in temperate areas. However it is a very common practice in the tropical areas of world because of the higher density, bigger size of the insect and yearlong availability in such areas. To encourage their consumption in temperate areas, it is now necessary to perform accurate research regarding food safety (minor components, toxicity, allergens,…) but also to develop value added products to make it easier for people to adapt with entomophagy. Furthermore we have to develop methods for commercial production and organize awareness campaigns to explain about the nutritional and other benefits related to locust & grasshopper consumption as food to people. [less ▲]

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See detailEnzymatic process for the fractionation of baker’s yeast cell wall (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)
Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem et al

in Food Chemistry (2014), 163

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