References of "Beguin, Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailGVHD chronique et effet anti-tumoral
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg

in Correspondance en Onco-Hématologie (2010), 5

It was demonstrated in 1981 that chronic GVHD was associated with a strong decrease of the relapse risk after conventional allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (graf-versus-tumor effects). Recent ... [more ▼]

It was demonstrated in 1981 that chronic GVHD was associated with a strong decrease of the relapse risk after conventional allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (graf-versus-tumor effects). Recent studies suggest that chronic GVHD might also been associated with improved progression-gree survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-allo), a transplant strategy based mainly on graft-versus-tumor effects for tumor eradication. Further, it has been demonstrated that elimination of leukemic cells after RIC-allo is due to donor T-cell cloones directed against multiple minor histocompatibility antigens (specific for the recipient) that are largely expressed not only by tumor cells but also by non-hematopoietic tissues, explaining the strong association between GVHD and graft-versus-tumor effects seen after RIC-allo. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells might prevent death from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) without abrogating graft-versus-tumor effects after HLA-mismatched allogeneic transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Lechanteur, Chantal ULg; Willems, Evelyne ULg et al

in Biology of Blood & Marrow Transplantation (2010), 16(6), 838-47

Recent studies have suggested that coinfusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) the day of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) might promote engraftment and prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have suggested that coinfusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) the day of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) might promote engraftment and prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after myeloablative allogeneic HCT. This prompted us to investigate in a pilot study whether MSC infusion before HCT could allow nonmyeloablative (NMA) HCT (a transplant strategy based nearly exclusively on graft-versus-tumor effects for tumor eradication) from HLA-mismatched donors to be performed safely. Twenty patients with hematologic malignancies were given MSCs from third party unrelated donors 30-120 minutes before peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors, after conditioning with 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) and fludarabine. The primary endpoint was safety, defined as a 100-day incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) <35%. One patient had primary graft rejection, whereas the remaining 19 patients had sustained engraftment. The 100-day cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) was 35%, whereas 65% of the patients experienced moderate/severe chronic GVHD (cGVHD). One-year NRM (10%), relapse (30%), overall survival (OS) (80%) and progression-free survival (PFS) (60%), and 1-year incidence of death from GVHD or infection with GVHD (10%) were encouraging. These figures compare favorably with those observed in a historic group of 16 patients given HLA-mismatched PBSCs (but no MSCs) after NMA conditioning, which had a 1-year incidence of NRM of 37% (P = .02), a 1-year incidence of relapse of 25% (NS), a 1-year OS and PFS of 44% (P = .02), and 38% (P = .1), respectively, and a 1-year rate of death from GVHD or infection with GVHD of 31% (P = .04). In conclusion, our data suggest that HLA-mismatched NMA HCT with MSC coinfusion appeared to be safe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProlonged ex vivo culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells influences their supportive activity toward NOD/SCID -repopulating cells and committed progenitor cells of B lymphoid and myeloid lineages
Briquet, Alexandra ULg; Dubois, Sophie ULg; Bekaert, Sandrine ULg et al

in Haematologica (2010), 95(1), 47-56

Background Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) support proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) in vitro. Since they represent a rare subset of BM cells, MSC ... [more ▼]

Background Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) support proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) in vitro. Since they represent a rare subset of BM cells, MSC preparations for clinical purposes involves a preparative step of ex vivo multiplication. The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of culture duration on MSC supportive activity. DESIGN AND METHODS: MSC were expanded for up to 10 passages. MSC and CD34(+) cells were seeded in cytokine-free co-cultures after which the phenotype, clonogenic capacity and in vivo repopulating activity of harvested hematopoietic cells were assessed. RESULTS: Early passage MSC supported HPC expansion and differentiation toward both B lymphoid and myeloid lineages. Late passage MSC did not support HPC and myeloid cell outgrowth but maintained B cell supportive ability. In vitro maintenance of NOD/SCID mouse repopulating cells cultured for one week in contact with MSC was effective until the fourth MSC passage and declined afterwards. CD34(+) cells achieved higher levels of engraftment in NOD/SCID mice when co-injected with early passage MSC; however MSC expanded beyond 9 passages were ineffective in promoting CD34(+) cell engraftment. Non-contact cultures indicated that MSC supportive activity involved diffusible factors. Among these, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 contributed to the supportive activity of early passage MSC but not of late passage MSC. MSC phenotype as well as fat, bone and cartilage differentiation capacity did not change during MSC culture. Conclusions Extended MSC culture alters their supportive ability toward HPC without concomitant changes in phenotype and differentiation capacity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (42 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpontaneous and granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor-enhanced marrow response and progenitor cell mobilization in mice after myocardial infarction.
Delgaudine, Marie ULg; Gothot, André ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg

in Cytotherapy (2010), 12(7), 909-18

BACKGROUND AIMS: Hematopoietic (HPC), mesenchymal (MPC) and/or endothelial (EPC) progenitor cells are being studied to repair the myocardium after acute or chronic ischemia. We examined marrow response to ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AIMS: Hematopoietic (HPC), mesenchymal (MPC) and/or endothelial (EPC) progenitor cells are being studied to repair the myocardium after acute or chronic ischemia. We examined marrow response to myocardial infarction (MI) and the ability of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to enhance mobilization of HPC, MPC and EPC in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of MI mice. METHODS: We induced MI in C57Bl/6 mice, while sham-operated (SO) animals were similarly operated on but without coronary artery ligation. Animals were treated with either saline or G-CSF, from day -5 to day +5 after MI or from day 0 to day +5. Progenitor cell numbers in PB and BM were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis and cell culture. RESULTS: White blood cells (WBC) decreased in BM and increased in PB after MI; G-CSF amplified this effect in BM but not in PB. HPC numbers decreased in BM after MI, while HPC and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFU) increased in PB only after G-CSF treatment, and more prominently so in MI than in SO mice. MPC and fibroblast-colony-forming units (F-CFU) as well as EPC were mobilized into the PB after MI and further after G-CSF treatment. Plasma troponin T concentrations decreased after G-CSF treatment. CONCLUSIONS: BM is globally affected by acute MI, but not simple body injury, with intense mobilization of marrow MPC and EPC into the PB but inhibition of HPC. Progenitor cell entry into the PB may be paralleled by depletion of their BM pools. G-CSF is required for HPC mobilization and enhances MPC and EPC entry into the PB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment strategy of acute leukemia
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg

in Belgian Journal of Medical Oncology [=BJMO] (2010), 4

This review article discusses the current indications for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid or lymphoblastic leukemia

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnteroviral meningoencephalitis as complication of Rituximab therapy in a patient treated for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
Servais, Sophie ULg; Caers, Jo ULg; Warling, Odette et al

in British Journal of Haematology (2010), 150(3), 379-381

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe umbilical cord matrix is a better source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) than the umbilical cord blood.
Zeddou, Mustapha ULg; Briquet, Alexandra ULg; Relic, Biserka ULg et al

in Cell Biology International (2010), 34(7), 693-701

Many studies have drawn attention to the emerging role of MSC (mesenchymal stem cells) as a promising population supporting new clinical concepts in cellular therapy. However, the sources from which these ... [more ▼]

Many studies have drawn attention to the emerging role of MSC (mesenchymal stem cells) as a promising population supporting new clinical concepts in cellular therapy. However, the sources from which these cells can be isolated are still under discussion. Whereas BM (bone marrow) is presented as the main source of MSC, despite the invasive procedure related to this source, the possibility of isolating sufficient numbers of these cells from UCB (umbilical cord blood) remains controversial. Here, we present the results of experiments aimed at isolating MSC from UCB, BM and UCM (umbilical cord matrix) using different methods of isolation and various culture media that summarize the main procedures and criteria reported in the literature. Whereas isolation of MSC were successful from BM (10:10) and (UCM) (8:8), only one cord blood sample (1:15) gave rise to MSC using various culture media [DMEM (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium) +5% platelet lysate, DMEM+10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), DMEM+10% human UCB serum, MSCGM] and different isolation methods [plastic adherence of total MNC (mononuclear cells), CD3+/CD19+/CD14+/CD38+-depleted MNC and CD133+- or LNGFR+-enriched MNC]. MSC from UCM and BM were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes and hepatocytes. The expansion potential was highest for MSC from UCM. The two cell populations had CD90+/CD73+/CD105+ phenotype with the additional expression of SSEA4 and LNGFR for BM MSC. These results clearly exclude UCB from the list of MSC sources for clinical use and propose instead UCM as a rich, non-invasive and abundant source of MSC. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailObservance thérapeutique en hématologie : le cas particulier de la leucémie myéloïde chronique
Roufosse, Renaud ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65

Therapeutic adhesion is essential because it modulates the efficiency of treatment, the occurrence of side effects and the socioeconomic costs possibly associated with it. In haematology, in the ... [more ▼]

Therapeutic adhesion is essential because it modulates the efficiency of treatment, the occurrence of side effects and the socioeconomic costs possibly associated with it. In haematology, in the particular case of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, the "ADAGIO" study performed by Noens and co-workers demonstrated that therapeutic observance is lower than the practitioners, the patients and the family members believe it is. This lack of adhesion can engender a decrease of the efficiency of treatment, in particular by imatinib. Factors such as the chronicity of the disease and the length of treatment modify therapeutic adhesion over time. Simple methods, addressing both the patient and the doctor should be developed to improve this therapeutic adhesion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPractice guidelines on the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia
Dirix, L.; Awada, A.; Bron, D. et al

in Belgian Journal of Medical Oncology [=BJMO] (2010), 4

On July 1st 2009, a panel of experts met with the goal to provide a joint medical opinion on the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA), as well as a joint ... [more ▼]

On July 1st 2009, a panel of experts met with the goal to provide a joint medical opinion on the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA), as well as a joint proposal for revised reimbursement criteria in Belgium. The goal is to provide a clear and workable guidance on the use of ESAs in their registrered indication : chemotherapy induced anemia in cancer patients. An overview of participating experts can be found in Table 1. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe lymphome du manteau
Jaspers, Aurélie ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Bonnet, Christophe ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65

Mantle cell lymphoma comprises 3 to 10% of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Cyclin D1 expression due to t(11;14) (q13;32) is considered as a hallmark of this lymphoma and plays a pivotal role in the ... [more ▼]

Mantle cell lymphoma comprises 3 to 10% of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Cyclin D1 expression due to t(11;14) (q13;32) is considered as a hallmark of this lymphoma and plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of lymphoma transformation. Median age at diagnosis ranges from 60 to 70 years, and diagnosis is often made at an advances stage with widespread lymphadenopathy and extranodular (particularly bone marrow and gastrointestinal) infiltration. First line treatment consists of combination chemotherapy followed with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in younger patients, while allogeneic HCT following non-myeloablative conditioning might have a role inpatients relapsing after autologous HCT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaladie du greffon contre l'hôte chronique : une prise en charge multidisciplinaire
Servais, Sophie ULg; Willems, Evelyne ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65

Chronic Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD) is a frequent complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. This review article describes recent advances in the classification and treatment of ... [more ▼]

Chronic Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD) is a frequent complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. This review article describes recent advances in the classification and treatment of chronic GVHD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat Is The Role For Regulatory T-Cells After Nonmyeloablative Conditioning?
Humblet-Baron, S.; CASTERMANS, Emilie ULg; Vanbellinghen, J.-F. et al

in Biology of Blood & Marrow Transplantation (2009, February), 15(2), 122-123

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA prospective randomized multicenter trial of darbepoetin-alfa and I.V. iron administration after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Beguin, Yves ULg; Maertens, J.; DE PRIJCK, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2009)

We conducted a multicenter prospective randomized study analyzing the impact of darbepoetin alfa (DA) with or mithout i.v. iron on erythroid recovery after autologous HCT.

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReconstitution du système immunitaire après allogreffe de cellules souches hématopoïétiques
Castermans, Emilie ULg; Hannon, Muriel ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(S1), 2-8

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) is frequently used as treatment for patients with hematological malignancies. Its efficacy depends in part on the destruction of recipient ... [more ▼]

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) is frequently used as treatment for patients with hematological malignancies. Its efficacy depends in part on the destruction of recipient tumors cells by donor immune cells contained in the graft (graft-versus-tumor effects), underlying the interest of stydying donor immune recovery after alloHCT. Further, donor immune cells play an important role in the prevention and treatment of infections after allHCT, and are the cause of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This article reviews the mechanisms of immune recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), as well as techniques currently used to monitor immune function following allHCT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCo-transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells might mitigate acute GvHD without abrogating graftversus- tumour alloreactivity after allogeneic transplantation with non-myeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; WILLEMS, Evelyne ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

Conference (2009)

Background: Results of nonmyeloablative HCT in pts with HLA-mismatched donors have been disappointing due to high incidence of graft rejection and severe acute GVHD. Recent studies have suggested that ... [more ▼]

Background: Results of nonmyeloablative HCT in pts with HLA-mismatched donors have been disappointing due to high incidence of graft rejection and severe acute GVHD. Recent studies have suggested that infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) the day of HCT might promote engraftment and prevent acute GVHD after myeloablative allogeneic HCT. However, some studies suggested that MSC co-infusion might abrogate graft-versus-host alloreactivity and graft-versus-tumor effects. This prompted us to investigate whether MSC infusion a few hours before HCT could allow nonmyeloablative HCT from HLA-mismatched donors to be performed safely (i.e. with a 100-day incidence of nonrelapse mortality < 35%). Methods: 20 patients with hematological malignancies were given MSC (1-2 x 10E6 cells/kg) from third party donors a few hours before PBSC from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors, after conditioning with 2 Gy TBI and fl udarabine 90 mg/m. Postgrafting immunosuppression included tacrolimus (day -3 to +180; tapered by day +365) and mycophenolate mofetil (tid days 0 to +42). HLA-compatibility was assessed at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRBI and DQBI loci: 13 pairs were mismatched for at least one HLA class I antigen (including 4 pairs who were also mismatched for 1 HLA-class II antigens (n=3) or 1 HLA-class I allele (n=1)), 1 pair was mismatched for 2 HLA class II alleles, while 6 pairs were mismatched for a single HLA class I (n=3) or HLA class II (n=3) alleles. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 288 (range, 76-571) days. One patient with secondary AML had primary graft rejection, while the remaining 19 patients had sustained engraftment. Median donor T-cell chimerism levels on days 28, 100, 180 and 365 after HCT were 90%, 98%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. Grade II, III and IV acute GVHD were seen in 5, 2 and 1 patients, respectively, while 7 experienced NIH moderate/severe chronic GVHD. Three of 7 patients with measurable disease at transplantation achieved complete remission on days 41, 104 and 353 after HCT. Two patients died of nonrelapse causes on days 74 and 114 after HCT, while 3 died of disease progression. Projected 1-yr overall and progressionfree survivals were 77% and 61%, respectively. Conclusions: HLA-mismatched nonmyeloablative HCT with MSC co-infusion appeared to be safe, with MSC co-infusion possibly mitigating graft-versus-host alloreactivity without abrogating graft-versus-tumor effects. Survival is encouraging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)