References of "Beguin, Yves"
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See detailGalectin-1 is involved in osteoclast biology
Muller, Joséphine ULg; Binsfeld, Marilène; DUBOIS, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2016)

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See detailadministration of Third-Party Mesenchymal Stromal Cells at the Time of Kidney Transplantation: Interim Safety Analysis at One-Year Follow-Up
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; Erpicum, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in Transplant International (2016), 29(Suppl 2), 13-6

Objective. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) therapy has been suggested in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC at the time of KTx ... [more ▼]

Objective. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) therapy has been suggested in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC at the time of KTx. Methods. On postoperative day 3 (D3), third-party MSC (~2.0x106/kg) were administered to 7 non-immunized first-transplant recipients from deceased donors, under standard immunosuppression (Basiliximab, Tacrolimus, MMF and steroids). No HLA matching was required for MSC donors. In parallel, 7 comparable KTx recipients were included as controls. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Results. No hemodynamic or immune-allergic side-effect was noted at the time of MSC injection. Still, 1 patient with a history of ischemic heart disease had a NSTEMI ~3h after MSC infusion. Four MSC patients presented with CMV reactivation within 165 ± 96 days post KTx, whereas 3 controls had positive polyoma-BK viremia within 92 ± 4d post KTx. Three MSC patients were affected by pneumonia within 269 ± 98d post KTx, whereas 3 controls had urinary infection within 48 ± 43d post KTx. No MSC engraftment syndrome was observed. At D14, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 47.1 ± 6.8 and 39.7 ± 5.9 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.05). At 1 year, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 43.1 ± 17.8 and 53.9 ± 13.4 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.25). At 3-month protocol biopsy, no rejection was evidenced in MSC or control patients. Later on, 1 acute rejection was diagnosed at D330 in 1 MSC patient. No biopsy-proven AR was noted in controls. Three patients developed anti-HLA antibodies against MSC (n=1) or shared kidney/MSC (n=2) mismatches. Conclusions. MSC infusion was safe in all patients except one. Incidence of opportunist and non-opportunist infections was similar in both MSC and control groups. No MSC engraftment syndrome was documented. No difference in eGFR was found at 1 year post KTx. Putative immunization against MSC was observed in 3 patients. [less ▲]

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See detailFamilial thyrogastric autoimmune syndrome : a study of 22 kindreds
Sid, Sélim ULg; LUTTERI, Laurence ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg et al

in Abstract book - 20th Annual Congress of the Belgian Society of Internal Medicine (2015, December)

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See detailL'Azacytidine comme traitement de la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte de type chronique sclérodermique expérimentale.
Fransolet, Gilles ULg; Ehx, Grégory ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

Conference (2015, November 19)

Introduction: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has remained a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for the last decades. Following unmanipulated peripheral-blood ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has remained a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for the last decades. Following unmanipulated peripheral-blood stem cell transplantation, 60% of the patients experience chronic GVHD while approximately 15% of them develop a sclerodermic form of chronic GVHD characterized by multiple organ fibrosis and loss of skin elasticity. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal protective role in the pathogenesis of chronic GVHD by inhibiting alloreactive conventional T cells (Tconvs). Several studies have shown that hypomethylating agents such as azacytidine (Aza) can demethylate the master transcription factor of Treg (Forkhead box protein 3 factor, FoxP3), thus promoting Treg differentiation from Tconvs. This work investigates the impact of Aza in a classical murine model of sclerodermic chronic GVHD (B10.D2  BALB/cJ). Methods: In vitro analyses have been performed to determine the impact of Aza on collagen production. NIH-3T3 fibroblastic cells were plated and stimulated with 50 ng of PDGF or 10 ng of TGF-beta. Cells were then cultured with various concentrations of Aza for 48 hours. After culture, cells were stained with Sirius Red before quantification of collagen amount by absorbance at 490 nm. For in vivo experiments, lethally irradiated (7 Gy) BALB/cJ recipient mice were injected with 107 bone marrow cells + 7.107splenocytes from B10.D2 donor mice to induce scl-cGVHD. Recipients were injected with either 0,5 or 2 mg/kg of Aza every 48 hours from day 10 to 30 following transplantation. GVHD was scored using a five criteria scale (weight loss, activity, fibrosis, hair loss and mice posture; 0-1-2 points/criteria). Mice were sacrificed at a score of 8/10 (or > 20% weight loss) or at day 52 after transplantation (end of experiment). Results: Concerning in vitro analyses, results suggest a decreased production of collagen at higher concentration of Aza with both stimulations (seen by a gradual diminution of absorbance). For in vivo experiments, mice treated with Aza 0.5 mg/kg (n = 14) or 2 mg/kg (n = 25) had significant lower clinical scores of GVHD compared to control ones (n = 23) after treatment. FACS analysis showed a higher proportion of Treg among CD4+ T cells in the blood of Aza 2 mg/kg mice than in control mice at day 35 following transplantation (P = 0.047), as well as a higher percentage of Tregs expressing the KI67 proliferative marker on the same time point (P = 0.0005). Finally, analyses of the cellular blood components with Cell-dyn demonstrated that Aza 2 mg/kg treated mice were significantly lymphopenic as compared to control mice at day 35 after transplantation (P = 0.05). Conclusion : Aza prevented sclerodermic GVHD in this classical murine model of chronic GVHD. [less ▲]

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See detailAzacytidine prevents experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease without abrogating graft-versus-leukemia effects
Ehx, Grégory ULg; Fransolet, Gilles ULg; de Leval, Laurence ULg et al

Conference (2015, November 13)

The demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (AZA) has proven its efficacy as treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, AZA can demethylate FOXP3 intron 1 (FOXP3i1) leading ... [more ▼]

The demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (AZA) has proven its efficacy as treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, AZA can demethylate FOXP3 intron 1 (FOXP3i1) leading to the generation of regulatory T cells (Treg). Here, we investigated the impact of AZA on xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (xGVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia effects in a humanized murine model of transplantation (human PBMCs-infused NSG mice), and described the impact of the drug on human T cells in vivo. We observed that AZA improved both survival and xGVHD scores. Further, AZA significantly decreased human T-cell proliferation as well as IFN-γ and TNF-α serum levels, and reduced the expression of GRANZYME B and PERFORIN 1 by cytotoxic T cells. In addition, AZA significantly increased Treg frequency through hypomethylation of FOXP3i1 as well as increased Treg proliferation. The later was subsequent to higher STAT5 signaling in Treg from AZA-treated mice, which resulted from higher IL-2 secretion by conventional T cells from AZA-treated mice itself secondary to demethylation of the IL-2 gene promoter by AZA. Importantly, Tregs harvested from AZA-treated mice were suppressive and stable over time since they persisted at high frequency in secondary transplant experiments. Finally, graft-versus-leukemia effects (assessed by growth inhibition of THP-1 cells, transfected to express the luciferase gene) were not abrogated by AZA. In summary, our data demonstrate that AZA prevents xGVHD without abrogating graft-versus-leukemia effects. These findings could serve of basis for further studies of GVHD prevention by AZA in acute myeloid leukemia patients offered an allogeneic transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailThird-party mesenchymal stem cell infusion in kidney transplant recipient: 6-month safety interim analysis
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; ERPICUM, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 223-224278

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) have immunomodulating properties and could be used as immunosuppressive agents. We report the 6- month safety results for the 5 first patients treated with MSC ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) have immunomodulating properties and could be used as immunosuppressive agents. We report the 6- month safety results for the 5 first patients treated with MSC after kidney transplantation (KTx). Here, we address 3 specific safety issues: immunization against MSC and engraftment syndrome defined as acute graft dysfunction not related to rejection and over-immunosuppression. Patients and method: MSC production was carried out locally. MSC were not matched with kidney recipients’ HLA. Included patients were non-immunized, first transplant recipients from deceased donors. MSC (1.5–3.0 9 106/kg) infusion was planned 3 to 5 days post KTx. Patients with cardiovascular instability post KTx were excluded. All patients were treated with Basiliximab induction, Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate Mofetil and Steroid. We prospectively screened for anti-HLA antibodies at month 1, 3 and 6. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. The local ethical committee approved the protocol. Results: Collectively there were 23/50 and 29/50 HLA mismatches (MM) with kidney and MSC donor respectively, out of which 5 were shared MM. One patient developed de novo DSA, 2 patients anti-HLA antibodies against shared kidney/MSC MM and 1 patient developed 2 specific antibodies against MSC (MSCSA) at month 6. All antibodies were anti HLA class I except for 1. We did not observe any “engraftment” syndrome. Three patients experienced non- severe opportunistic infections: 1 CMV reactivation and 2 polyoma-BK virus viremia.Conclusion: We did not observe any strong safety signal. We did however observe some degree of immunization in 3 patients: 2 developed antibodies against shared kidney/MSC donor HLA MM and 1 MSCSA. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 1027

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Methods: 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5–3 9 106/kg third party MSC on post-operative day 3 ` 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. This study is in part supported by an ESOT Senior Clinical Research Grant and by the University of Liege. [less ▲]

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See detailImmune Recovery after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation following Flu-TBI versus TLI-ATG Conditioning
HANNON, Muriel ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg; Ehx, Grégory ULg et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2015), 21(14), 3131-9

Purpose: A conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) combining total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) plus anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been develop to induce graft ... [more ▼]

Purpose: A conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) combining total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) plus anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been develop to induce graft-versus-tumor effects without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Experimental Design: We compared immune recovery in 53 patients included in a phase II randomized study comparing nonmyeloablative HCT following either fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI arm, n=28) or 8 Gy TLI plus anti-thymocyte globulin (TLI arm, n=25). Results: In comparison to TBI patients, TLI patients had a similarly low 6-month incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD, a lower incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD (P=0.02), a higher incidence of CMV reactivation (P<0.001), and a higher incidence of relapse (P=0.01). While recovery of total CD8+ T cells was similar in the two groups, with median CD8+ T cell counts reaching the normal values 40-60 days after allo-HCT, TLI patients had lower percentages of naïve CD8 T cells. Median CD4+ T cell counts did not reach the lower limit of normal values the first year after allo-HCT in the two groups. Further, CD4+ T cell counts were significantly lower in TLI than in TBI patients the first 6 months after transplantation. Interestingly, while median absolute regulatory T cell (Treg) counts were comparable in TBI and TLI patients, Treg/naïve CD4+ T cell ratios were significantly higher in TLI than in TBI patients the 2 first years after transplantation. Conclusions: Immune recovery differs substantially between these two conditioning regimens possibly explaining the different clinical outcomes observed (NCT00603954). [less ▲]

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See detailThird-party mesenchymal stem cell infusion in kidney transplant recipient: 6-month safety interim analysis
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; ERPICUM, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2015, May), 15(suppl 3),

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stromal cells after liver transplantation: a phase 1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 27)

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases ... [more ▼]

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing bone marrow progenitors that have been shown both in vitro and in vivo as capable of (i) immunomodulation, (ii) anti-inflammation in case of ischemia/reperfusion injury, and (ii) stimulation of tissue repair. MSC could therefore be very interesting in organ recipients to limit chronic graft damage and to allow tolerance. This study aimed to be the first clinical evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled, phase I study. Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post- operative day 3 ± 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. This phase I study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

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