References of "Bastin, Christine"
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See detailRecollection versus familiarity in normal aging and in mild cognitive impairment: Impact of test format
Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Simon, Jessica ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2016, March 18)

Objectives. Memory retrieval typically involves a combination of recollection and familiarity. However, test format can promote one or the other process (Norman & O’Reilly, 2003). The aim of this study ... [more ▼]

Objectives. Memory retrieval typically involves a combination of recollection and familiarity. However, test format can promote one or the other process (Norman & O’Reilly, 2003). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of test format on recollection and familiarity in normal aging and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods. Seventy young participants (18-30 years), 65 “younger-old” (55- 69 years), 53 “older-old” (70-85 years), and 13 MCIs (55-82 years) were enrolled. In the “forced-choice” task, they had to recognize which picture, among three, was presented during the encoding stage. In the “yes/no” task, they had to judge whether each item, successively presented, was previously seen or not. In each task, they had to give a “Remember/Know/Guess” judgment. Results. Group × Format repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that young people had better recognition performance (d’) than “younger-old”, which were better than “older-old” and MCIs. Moreover, young people used familiarity more accurately than both groups of old participants and MCIs, with MCIs being equivalent to “younger-old” and “older-old”. However, MCIs displayed a high rate of familiarity-based false alarms. The resort to recollection decreased with age and in MCIs. Finally, Group × Format interaction revealed that young people (but not the other groups) could use recollection more often in the “forcedchoice” task compared to the “yes/no” task. Conclusions. Recollection and familiarity decline progressively in healthy aging. In MCI, recollection is more affected than familiarity, but patients demonstrated a more liberal use of familiarity. Finally, test format did not influence strongly the results. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural bases of subsequent forgetting in young and older adults
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2016, March 17)

Objectives Using functional MRI, we looked into the age-related difference in the neural underpinnings of subsequent forgetting - cerebral activation at encoding for items that are later forgotten ... [more ▼]

Objectives Using functional MRI, we looked into the age-related difference in the neural underpinnings of subsequent forgetting - cerebral activation at encoding for items that are later forgotten. Methods In an MRI scanner, during an incidental encoding phase, participants (20 young and 19 older adults) were presented with black-and-white drawings of objects. They were instructed to perform a size judgement on the depicted objects. Then, still in the scanner, the volunteers' memory for the objects was tested by showing them pictures shown previously along with new ones and asking them to make a Remember/Know/New judgement. Results Behaviourally, older participants showed decreased recollection, but intact familiarity at recognition. In an event-related design (SPM8), we compared cerebral areas activated at encoding for items subsequently forgotten compared to those leading to recollection (p<.001 uncorrected). In both groups, a pattern of activation consistent with the default-mode network (DMN) was found. Furthermore, results pointed out to additional activations in the frontoparietal control network in older adults. Also, contrasting activations for items subsequently forgotten with those leading to familiarity revealed activations in DMN areas. In young adults, these activations were limited to the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions The forgetting of information appears to be associated with a higher recruitment of the DMN, which might reflect disengagement from encoding-supportive processes, both in young and older participants. Moreover, the additional fronto-parietal activity found in the older group could indicate that their failure to recollect the pictures was related to inefficient encoding mechanisms, in addition to disengagement from the task. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhancing the salience of perceptual fluency improves familiarity-based recognition memory in aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2016, March 17)

Objective. Normal aging is characterized by decreased recollection, but better preserved familiarity. Memory tasks that facilitate the use of familiarity should allow attenuating age-related differences ... [more ▼]

Objective. Normal aging is characterized by decreased recollection, but better preserved familiarity. Memory tasks that facilitate the use of familiarity should allow attenuating age-related differences in memory. The study tested two hypotheses: (1) can the reliance on familiarity during recognition memory be promoted by increasing the difference in perceptual processing fluency between old and new items; (2) can this manipulation reduce age-related difficulties in episodic memory? Methods. Twenty-four young and 24 older adults performed two verbal recognition memory tasks. In the No-Overlap task, target words and new words did not share any letter. Prior exposition to the target words thus induced increased processing fluency of the words and letters, so that fluency difference was a salient and reliable cue to discriminate between old and new words. In the Overlap task, target and new words had letters in common, so fluency cues were less useful. Recollection and familiarity was assessed with the Remember/Know/Guess paradigm. Results. There was an age effect on recollection but intact familiarity. Moreover, (1) memory performance was better in the No Overlap than the Overlap task, with a greater hit rate and a smaller false alarm rate associated with familiarity. (2) Age-related differences in recognition accuracy (hits – false alarms) were significantly attenuated in the No Overlap task compared to the Overlap task. Conclusion. These findings suggest that minimizing the perceptual similarity between targets and distractors, and thus increasing processing fluency differences, allowed to reduce the effect of age on recognition memory performance by facilitating the use of familiarity. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of cognitive reserve on recognition memory performance is dependent of the task format in healthy aging
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

Poster (2016, March 17)

Objective: According to the cognitive reserve hypothesis (Stern, 2009), individuals who have developed a high level of reserve should resist better to the effects of aging than individuals with lower ... [more ▼]

Objective: According to the cognitive reserve hypothesis (Stern, 2009), individuals who have developed a high level of reserve should resist better to the effects of aging than individuals with lower cognitive reserve. In this study, we identified the factors of cognitive reserve that impact most memory performance in aging. Methods: 118 healthy older participants performed one yes/no recognition task and one 3-alternative forced-choice recognition task. For each recognized item, participants provided a Remember/Know/Guess judgment. Furthermore, participants completed a questionnaire assessing different aspects of cognitive reserve (level of education, occupation, physical, social, cultural and intellectual activities). We determined the moderators of cognitive reserve that explain a significant proportion of variance for each memory index through stepwise regression analyzes (p<0.05). Results: In the forced-choice test, the level of education explained positively the use of recollection and negatively the level of false alarms associated with familiarity. In the yes/no recognition task, the precision of recognition was explained positively by the physical activities. Recollection was positively explained by the physical activities and the level of education. Finally, the level of false alarms associated with familiarity was explained negatively by the level of education although the precision of the use of the familiarity is explained positively by physical activities. Conclusion: The more older adults were educated and/or were practicing physical activities, the better their recollection was. The impact of the moderators of the cognitive reserve is dependent on the format of the recognition task. [less ▲]

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See detailSuccessful episodic memory encoding in ageing: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2016, January 25)

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See detailPrevalence of vasculare risk factors in different stages of prodromal Alzheimer’s disease and its influence on cognitive decline
Bos, I.; Vos, S.; Frölich, L. et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2016), 12(7), 1059-1061

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See detailDisrupted interaction between memory and self in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Memory (2016)

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See detailThe impact of aging on associative memory for pre-existing unitized associations
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2016)

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See detailVolumetric brain MRI measurements in a retrospective Belgian multi-centr MRI biomarker study in dementia - REMEMBER
Niemantsverdriet; Smeets, D.; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2016)

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See detailThe ultimate role of the perirhinal cortex in familiarity: a novel hypothesis
Besson, Gabriel ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Memory (2016)

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See detailBridging familiarity and novelty detection: a matter of timing?
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Moulin, Christopher et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Memory (2016)

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See detailThe impact of preexisting semantic integration on associative memory in normal aging
Bastin, Christine ULg

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Memory (2016)

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See detailEpisodic memory and aging: The effect of perceptual processing fluency on recognition memory processes
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2016), S2016

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See detailThe effect of aging on associative memory for semantically-related word pairs
Folville, Adrien; Delhaye, Emma ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

Poster (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (10 ULg)
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See detailSemantic relatedness of the memoranda prevents older adults from benefitting from unitization
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Tibon, Roni; Gronau, Nurit et al

Poster (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (6 ULg)