References of "Bastin, Christine"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExploration of unitization processes in episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMetabolic cerebral correlates of conjunctive and relational memory in Alzheimer's disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Introduction. Memory deficits are the clinical hallmark of typical Alzheimer’s disease. The precise nature of these deficits however remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we investigated ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Memory deficits are the clinical hallmark of typical Alzheimer’s disease. The precise nature of these deficits however remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we investigated binding in long-term episodic memory. Relational binding processes in memory create an associative link between independent items or between items and context into episodic memories (Cohen et al., 1999). An alternative process, conjunctive binding, allows associations to be encoded as a united representation of features into a single entity (O'Reilly and Rudy, 2001; Mayes et al., 2007). The current study (1) assessed whether Alzheimer’s disease disrupt both conjunctive and relational memory, and (2) related patients’ memory performance to cerebral metabolism. Methods. Thirty patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease and 24 healthy older adults performed a source memory task where items were associated to a background color (Diana et al., 2008, 2010). In one condition, relational binding was promoted by the instruction to associate the item with another object of the same color as the background. In the other condition, color had to be integrated as an item feature (conjunctive binding). Patients’ brain metabolic activity at rest (FDG-PET) was analysed with spatio-temporal Partial Least Squares (McIntosh et al., 1996) in order to assess the relation of behavioral performance and activity in functional cerebral networks. Results. Alzheimer’s disease patients had an impaired capacity to remember item-color associations, with deficits in both relational and conjunctive memory. However, performance in the two kinds of associative memory varied independently across patients. Partial least square analyses revealed a significant pattern of metabolic activity that correlated specifically with each condition (accounting for 76.48 % of the covariance in the data; p< .05). More specifically, poor conjunctive memory was related to hypometabolism in an anterior temporal-posterior fusiform brain network, whereas relational memory correlated with metabolism in regions of the default mode network. Conclusions. These findings support the hypothesis of distinct neural systems specialized in different types of associative memory and point to heterogeneous profiles of memory alteration in Alzheimer’s disease as a function of damage to the respective neural networks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Partial Least Squares Analysis of the self reference effect in Alzheimer's disease: A reply to Irish
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 54

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDorsomedial prefrontal metabolism and unawareness of current characteristics of personality traits in Alzheimer’s disease
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2014)

Anosognosia is a complex symptom corresponding to a lack of awareness of one’s current clinical status. Anosognosia for cognitive deficits has frequently been described in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while ... [more ▼]

Anosognosia is a complex symptom corresponding to a lack of awareness of one’s current clinical status. Anosognosia for cognitive deficits has frequently been described in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while unawareness of current characteristics of personality traits has rarely been considered. We used a well-established questionnaire-based method in a group of 37 AD patients and in healthy controls to probe self- and hetero-evaluation of patients’ personality and we calculated differential scores between each participant’s and his/her relative’s judgments. A brain-behavior correlation was performed using FDG-PET images. The behavioral data showed that AD patients presented with anosognosia for current characteristics of their personality and their anosognosia was primarily explained by impaired third perspective taking. The brain-behavior correlation analysis revealed a negative relationship between anosognosia for current characteristics of personality and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) activity. Behavioral and neuroimaging data are consistent with the view that impairment of different functions subserved by the dMPFC (self-evaluation, inferences regarding complex enduring dispositions of self and others, confrontation of perspectives in interpersonal scripts) plays a role in anosognosia for current characteristics of personality in AD patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (16 ULg)
See detailPLS analysis of fMRI data on cognitive processes
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Conference (2013, December 12)

Cognitive processes like memory and self-referential are known to be underlined by extended neural networks. To study these complex processes, multivariate methods appear as the methods of the first ... [more ▼]

Cognitive processes like memory and self-referential are known to be underlined by extended neural networks. To study these complex processes, multivariate methods appear as the methods of the first choice since they take into account the functional integration. Partial Least Square (PLS) was used to study neural networks related to memory and self-referential processing in Alzheimer’s disease patients (AD) and two examples were presented. In the first one, we investigated the metabolic correlates of two forms of memory (conjunctive and relational memory performances) in AD. PLS identified two different brain networks highlighting correlations of the two types of memory and the glucose metabolism. In the second example, we assessed brain regions engaged during self-referential processing of information in AD patients during a task related fMRI study. PLS identified a wide brain network showing the effect of self- vs. other-referential processing. In contrast to univariate methods, PLS showed to be suitable for the study of cognitive processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of the salience of fluency in recognition memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Simon, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2013, December 06)

According to the dual-process models, recognition memory is supported by recollection and familiarity (Yonelinas, 2002). Familiarity is a complex function that depends on several processes. One of the ... [more ▼]

According to the dual-process models, recognition memory is supported by recollection and familiarity (Yonelinas, 2002). Familiarity is a complex function that depends on several processes. One of the most important mechanisms is the sense of familiarity driven by the fluency processing (Whittlesea, 1993). The fluency can be defined by the enhancement of processing speed and the ease of processing due to an earlier encounter with the stimulus. Our objective is to explore the effect on an increase of salience of fluency cues on the recognition memory performance of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Sixteen AD patients and sixteen healthy elderly controls (HC) performed two conditions of a memory task. In the study phase, 25 words were presented at a rate of one word every 1.5s. Participants were instructed to read the words aloud and to try and remember them. After a break of 5 minutes, participant performed a yes/no recognition task with 25 studied words and 25 new words. In the Non-Overlap condition, the 25 studied words were composed of a subset of letters of the alphabet and the 25 new words of the remaining letters. In the Overlap condition, the 50 words were based on the whole alphabet. The two recognition tasks were separated by a delay of 24h. The capacity to discriminate between old and new items was measured by the index d’. An ANOVA on d’ scores revealed that discrimination was poorer in the AD group than in the HC and also poorer in the Overlap condition than in the Non-Overlap condition. The current results showed that to increase salience of fluency at the level of letter by eliminating letter-overlap between old and new words increases the recognition performance to the same extent in both groups but the amplitude of AD memory deficit was not reduced (Bastin, Willems, Genon, & Salmon, 2013). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAge estimation from faces in Alzheimer disease
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although studies on age estimation showed that the performance of estimation is fairly accurate, this performance can be influenced by group biases such as the own-age bias (George & Hole, 1995). Moreover ... [more ▼]

Although studies on age estimation showed that the performance of estimation is fairly accurate, this performance can be influenced by group biases such as the own-age bias (George & Hole, 1995). Moreover this bias occurs both in young and older adults (Moyse & Brédart, 2012). Because difficulties in face processing have been reported in Alzheimer disease (Della Sala et al., 1995), the aim of this study was to examine the performance of age estimation from faces in patients with Alzheimer disease (mild to moderate) compared with normal aging persons. Moreover to test the preservation of the occurrence of an own-age bias, stimuli belonging to different age groups (young, middle age and older adults) were used. We observed a main effect of Group indicating that patients were less accurate than control whatever the age of faces. In addition a main effect of Age of faces was obtained; the percentage of accuracy was better for older faces than for the two other age groups of faces. Consequently although patients’ performance in age estimation of faces is impaired, an own-age bias was still present. These results have two main interests: a clinical interest (expanding the diagnostic criteria of the Alzheimer disease) and a forensic interest (assessing the credibility of eyewitness testimony in older adults with a possible Alzheimer disease). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras syndrome during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Cappa, Rémi et al

Poster (2013, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (16 ULg)