References of "Bastin, Catherine"
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See detailConsequences of selection for milk quality and robustness traits
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Berry, D. P.; Coffey, M. P. et al

Conference (2011, August)

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See detailPrediction of cow pregnancy status using conventional and novel mid-infrared predicted milk traits
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gillon, Alain et al

in Book of Abstracts of the 62nd Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2011, August)

The objective of this study was to determine the ability of conventional milk cow characteristics and novel traits predicted by mid infrared (MIR) obtained from milk recording to predict the pregnancy ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to determine the ability of conventional milk cow characteristics and novel traits predicted by mid infrared (MIR) obtained from milk recording to predict the pregnancy status once the cow was inseminated. Conventional milk recording, spectral, and reproductive data collected in Luxembourg Hoslteins between 2008 and 2010 were used. Cows were defined as pregnant if they were positively checked and calved between 267 and 295 d later after the last AI or if they had calved between the later intervals when no checks were recorded. Pregnant or not within 3 intervals after last AI (<=35 d, 45-60 d, and 60-90 d) was modeled using logistic regression models firstly as a function of conventional cow milk characteristics and extended to fatty acids as novel traits predicted by MIR in a second step. The lactation curve characteristics for milk, fat, protein, and lactose yields were estimated using modified best prediction method. Test-day fatty acid contents were estimated from collected MIR spectra using an appropriate calibration equation. Two third proportion and one third of the whole data set were randomly selected for calibration and validation models respectively. The relation between the predicted and observed probabilities of cow pregnancy was approximately linear for calibration and validation models. The sensitivity-specificity combination for cow pregnancy increased when fatty acids were added to conventional milk characteristics as inputs to the different models (from 78 to 85% for sensitivity and from 40 to 52% for specificity). Results based on those models showed that it would be possible to help breeders to manage cow fertility using such tool implemented in the milk recording organizations. [less ▲]

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See detailIs there value in maintaining small populations ? Example of the Dual-Purpose Belgian Blue breed.
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2011, July 13)

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes ... [more ▼]

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes obvious that different, often related, issues appear (e.g., lack of large training populations, need for expensive recording of new phenotypes). Also, there is an urgent need to rethink issues that are important for sustainability of dairy production (e.g., added value foods, animal robustness). In this context, small populations (breeds/lines) could represent a potential source of extra information to justify their maintenance. As marker densities increase, efficient dissection of different selection histories of divergent breeds or lines, potentially identifying pockets of unexploited variability will increase. A current example from the Belgian (Walloon) perspective is the Dual Purpose (DP) line of the Belgian Blue Breed (BBB), with presently around 4500 breeding females, for historical reason of which only 1500 have good pedigrees, and which is present in Belgium and northern France. Recent research, done on this line, showed its tendency to produce less saturated milk fat and to have better fertility. Results indicated that it could stay competitive in specific markets, especially because of largely increased meat value. Currently, the myostatin mutation is largely used for breeding purposes. To assess the genetic diversity of the breed, recently, over 200 genotypes (SNP50K) for nearly all breeding bulls of the last 20 years became available. HD genotypes should be available in the near future, also allowing to access selection history of this breed as being in between the 2 extreme breeds: Beef BBB (with which it shares a recent history) and Holstein-Friesian (which is related through its geographic proximity over centuries). Finally, genomic selection for DP-BBB will need to consider a single step type approach without the need of reference population and potentially relying heavily on SNP3K of cows, also with the objective to recreate relationships between animals of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailRobustMilk - Développer des outils de sélection pratiques et innovants pour la production de produits laitiers de qualité issus de vaches plus robustes : Sélectionner sur le profil en acides gras du lait
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg

in 16ième Carrefour des productions animales: La Filière laitière bovine est-elle durable?, Gembloux, le 2 mars 2011 (2011, March 02)

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See detailMid-infrared predictions of lactoferrin content in bovine milk
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Colinet, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2011), 94(E-suppl.1), 714

Lactoferrin (LF) is a glycoprotein present in milk and active in the immune system of cows and humans. Therefore, an inexpensive and rapid analysis to quantify this protein is desirable. A previous study ... [more ▼]

Lactoferrin (LF) is a glycoprotein present in milk and active in the immune system of cows and humans. Therefore, an inexpensive and rapid analysis to quantify this protein is desirable. A previous study reported the potential to quantify LF from the mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry from 69 milk samples. Through the European RobustMilk project (www.robustmilk.eu), 3,606 milk samples were collected in Belgium, Ireland, and Scotland from individual cows and analyzed using a MIR MilkoScanFT6000 spectrometer. Milk LF content was quantified using ELISA in duplicate. Average ELISA data with a CV lower than 5% were used. After the detection of spectral and ELISA outliers, the calibration set contained 2,499 samples. An equation to predict LF content from MIR was developed using partial least squared regression. A first derivative pre-treatment of spectra was used to correct the baseline drift. To improve the repeatability of the spectral data, a file which contained the spectra of samples analyzed on 5 spectrometers was used during the calibration. The lactoferrin mean was 159.28 mg/l of milk with a SD of 97.21 mg/l of milk. The calibration (C) coefficient of determination (R2) was equal to 0.73 with a standard error (SE) of calibration of 50.54 mg/l of milk. A cross-validation (CV) was used to assess the robustness of the equation. R2 CV was 0.72 with a SE-CV of 51.16 mg/l of milk. An external validation (V) was conducted on 150 milk samples collected in Belgium. The SE of prediction (SEP) was 59.17 mg/L of milk. The similarity between R2 C and R2CV as well as between SE-C and SE-CV and between SE-CV and SEP confirms the equations developed are robust. The correlation between predicted and measured LF values was 0.71. This lower value compared with the one obtained from the calibration set (0.85) could be explained by the low ELISA reproducibility (16.24% ± 25.51%). If the developed equation is used to clean the validation data set, a total of 16 samples can be deleted. The validation coefficient for these 134 samples increased to 0.82. From these results, the developed equation could be used for screening the dairy cow population for breeding purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic and genetic variability of production traits and milk fatty acid contents across days in milk for Walloon Holstein first-parity cows.
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg

in Journal of Dairy Science (2011), 94(8), 4152-63

The objective of this study was to assess the phenotypic and genetic variability of production traits and milk fatty acid (FA) contents throughout lactation. Genetic parameters for milk, fat, and protein ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to assess the phenotypic and genetic variability of production traits and milk fatty acid (FA) contents throughout lactation. Genetic parameters for milk, fat, and protein yields, fat and protein contents, and 19 groups and individual FA contents in milk were estimated for first-parity Holstein cows in the Walloon Region of Belgium using single-trait, test-day animal models and random regressions. Data included 130,285 records from 26,166 cows in 531 herds. Heritabilities indicated that de novo synthesized FA were under stronger genetic control than FA originating from the diet and from body fat mobilization. Estimates for saturated short- and medium-chain individual FA ranged from 0.35 for C4:0 to 0.44 for C8:0, whereas those for monounsaturated long-chain individual FA were lower (around 0.18). Moreover, de novo synthesized FA were more heritable in mid to late lactation. Approximate daily genetic correlations among traits were calculated as correlations between daily breeding values for days in milk between 5 and 305. Averaged daily genetic correlations between milk yield and FA contents did not vary strongly among FA (around -0.35) but they varied strongly across days in milk, especially in early lactation. Results indicate that cows selected for high milk yield in early lactation would have lower de novo synthesized FA contents in milk but a slightly higher content of C18:1 cis-9, indicating that such cows might mobilize body fat reserves. Genetic correlations among FA emphasized the combination of FA according to their origin: contents in milk of de novo FA were highly correlated with each other (from 0.64 to 0.99). Results also showed that genetic correlations between C18:1 cis-9 and other FA varied strongly during the first 100 d in milk and reinforced the statement that the release of long-chain FA inhibits FA synthesis in the mammary gland while the cow is in negative energy balance. Finally, results showed that the FA profile in milk changed during the lactation phenotypically and genetically, emphasizing the relationship between the physiological status of cow and milk composition. [less ▲]

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See detailShort communication: estimates of genetic parameters of body condition score in the first 3 lactations using a random regression animal model.
Loker, S.; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Miglior, F. et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2011), 94(7), 3693-9

The objective of this research was to estimate the genetic parameters of body condition score (BCS) in the first 3 lactations in Canadian Holstein dairy cattle using a multiple-lactation random regression ... [more ▼]

The objective of this research was to estimate the genetic parameters of body condition score (BCS) in the first 3 lactations in Canadian Holstein dairy cattle using a multiple-lactation random regression animal model. Field staff from Valacta milk recording agency (Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC, Canada) collected BCS from Quebec herds several times throughout each lactation. Approximately 32,000, 20,000, and 11,000 first-, second-, and third-parity BCS were analyzed, respectively, from a total of 75 herds. Body condition score was a moderately heritable trait over the lactation for parity 1, 2, and 3, with average daily heritabilities of 0.22, 0.26, and 0.30, respectively. Daily heritability ranged between 0.14 and 0.26, 0.19 and 0.28, and 0.24 and 0.33 for parity 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Genetic variance of BCS increased with days in milk within lactations. The low genetic variance in early lactation suggests that the evolution of the ability to mobilize tissue reserves in early lactation provided cattle with a major advantage, and is, therefore, somewhat conserved. The increasing genetic variance suggests that more genetic differences were related to how well cows recovered from the negative energy balance state. More specifically, increasing genetic variation as lactation progressed could be a reflection of genetic differences in the ability of cows to efficiently control the rate of mobilization of tissue reserves, which would not be crucial in early lactation. The shape of BCS curves was similar across parities. From first to third parity, differences included the progressively deeper nadir and faster rate of recovery of condition. Daily genetic correlations between parities were calculated from 5 to 305 DIM, and were summed and divided by 301 to obtain average daily genetic correlations. The average daily genetic correlations were 0.84 between parity 1 and 2, 0.83 between parity 1 and 3, and 0.86 between parity 2 and 3. Although not 1, these genetic correlations are still strong, so much of the variation observed in BCS was controlled by the same genes for each of the first 3 lactations. If a genetic evaluation for BCS is developed, regular collection of first-lactation BCS records should be sufficient for genetic evaluation. [less ▲]

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See detailIs there value in maintaining small populations ? Example of the Dual-Purpose Belgian Blue breed.
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2011), 94(E-suppl.1), 664

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes ... [more ▼]

Current status of thinking on genomic selection in dairy cattle is mostly major breed centric (e.g., Holstein) and only for traditional traits (e.g., milk yields). Once you depart from this, it becomes obvious that different, often related, issues appear (e.g., lack of large training populations, need for expensive recording of new phenotypes). Also, there is an urgent need to rethink issues that are important for sustainability of dairy production (e.g., added value foods, animal robustness). In this context, small populations (breeds/lines) could represent a potential source of extra information to justify their maintenance. As marker densities increase, efficient dissection of different selection histories of divergent breeds or lines, potentially identifying pockets of unexploited variability will increase. A current example from the Belgian (Walloon) perspective is the Dual Purpose (DP) line of the Belgian Blue Breed (BBB), with presently around 4500 breeding females, for historical reason of which only 1500 have good pedigrees, and which is present in Belgium and northern France. Recent research, done on this line, showed its tendency to produce less saturated milk fat and to have better fertility. Results indicated that it could stay competitive in specific markets, especially because of largely increased meat value. Currently, the myostatin mutation is largely used for breeding purposes. To assess the genetic diversity of the breed, recently, over 200 genotypes (SNP50K) for nearly all breeding bulls of the last 20 years became available. HD genotypes should be available in the near future, also allowing to access selection history of this breed as being in between the 2 extreme breeds: Beef BBB (with which it shares a recent history) and Holstein-Friesian (which is related through its geographic proximity over centuries). Finally, genomic selection for DP-BBB will need to consider a single step type approach without the need of reference population and potentially relying heavily on SNP3K of cows, also with the objective to recreate relationships between animals of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic parameters of mastitis-correlated milk components in first parity dairy cows
Gillon, Alain ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg et al

Conference (2010, August 06)

Ind. of lactoferrin content, ind. of Na content, and lactose content were the three most correlated milk components with somatic cell score among available milk components predicted by mid-infrared ... [more ▼]

Ind. of lactoferrin content, ind. of Na content, and lactose content were the three most correlated milk components with somatic cell score among available milk components predicted by mid-infrared spectrometry on 590,083 test-day records from Walloon Region of Belgium collected between 2007 and 2009. Mean daily heritabilities and mean genetic correlations of these four traits were estimated using Gibbs sampling methodology applied to a multi-trait random regression test-day model with a subset of these records. Mean daily heritabilities of ind. lactoferrin content (0.34), ind. Na content (0.37) and lactose content (0.42) were higher then SCS (0.16) and mean genetic correlations were moderate (from -0.18 to -0.73), showing that these traits could be used together to describe udder health in genetic evaluations instead of SCS alone when clinical mastitis data are not available. [less ▲]

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