References of "Barth, Alexander"
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See detailError assessment of sea surface temperature satellite data relative to in situ data: effect of spatial and temporal coverage
Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg; Troupin, Charles ULg et al

Conference (2010, April 30)

A comparison between satellite and in situ sea surface temperature (SST) data in the Western Mediterranean Sea in 1999 is shown. The aim of this study is to better understand the differences between these ... [more ▼]

A comparison between satellite and in situ sea surface temperature (SST) data in the Western Mediterranean Sea in 1999 is shown. The aim of this study is to better understand the differences between these two data sets, in order to compute merged maps of SST using satellite and in situ data. When merging temperature from different platforms, it is crucial to take the expected RMS error of the observations into account and to correct for possible biases. Different in situ data sensors and platforms (CTD, XBT, drifter, etc) are available for the comparison, each with specificities in the nature of the measurement (accuracy and precision of the measures), and with different spatial and temporal distributions. A comparison with satellite data needs to take these factors into account. Statistics about the differences due to the hour of the day, the month of the year, the type of sensor/ platform used and the spatial distribution is therefore realised through a combination of error measures, diagrams and statistical hypothesis testing. The data used are Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) SST day-time and night-time satellite data, and in situ temperature data from various databases (World Ocean Database’05, Coriolis, Medar/Medatlas and ICES). [less ▲]

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See detailSynthesis of regional product activities JRA4-JRA9
Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

Conference (2010, April 01)

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See detailSeaDataNet regional climatologies: an overview
Troupin, Charles ULg; Ouberdous, Mohamed ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (2 ULg)
See detailA web interface for gridding and visualizing oceanographic data sets
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Sirjacobs, Damien ULg et al

Conference (2010, March)

Spatial interpolation of observations on a regular grid is a common task in many oceanographic disciplines (and geosciences in general). Diva (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) is an analysis tool ... [more ▼]

Spatial interpolation of observations on a regular grid is a common task in many oceanographic disciplines (and geosciences in general). Diva (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) is an analysis tool for gridding oceanographic in situ data. Diva takes the error in the observations and the typical spatial scale of the underlying field into account. Barriers due to the coastline and the topography in general are also used to propagate the information of a given observation spatially. Diva is a command-line driven application. To make Diva easier to use, a web interface has been developed. The user can directly upload his/her data in ASCII format and enter several parameters for the analysis. The analyzed field, location of the observations, and the error mask are then directly visualized in the browser. While this interface allows the user to create his/her own gridded field, a web interface is also developed to visualize pre-computed gridded oceanographic data sets. Those data sets are typically four-dimensional (longitude, latitude, depth and time). The system allows to visualize horizontal sections at a given depth and time to study the horizontal distribution of a given variable. It is also possible to display the results on an arbitrary vertical section. To study the evolution of the variable in time, the horizontal and vertical sections can also be animated. The user can customize the plot by changing the color-map, the range of the color-bar, the type of the plot (linearly interpolated color, simple contours, filled contours) and download the current view as a simple image or as Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file for visualization in applications such as Google Earth. The system is build using a client and server architecture. The server is written in Python using the Web Server Gateway Interface. The server implements version 1.1.1 and 1.3.0 of the Web Map Service (WMS) protocol of the Open Geospatial Consortium. On the server, all oceanographic data sets are stored as NetCDF files organized in folders and sub-folders allowing for a hierarchical presentation of the available variables. The client is build as a web application using the OpenLayers Javascript library. The web interface is accessible at http://gher-diva.phys.ulg.ac.be/. It is currently used for climatologies created in the frame of the SeaDataNet project and will be used for the EMODNET project (chemical lot). Thrid-party data centers can also integrate the web interface of Diva to show an interpolated field of in situ data as an additional WMS layer. A demonstration near-real time cloud-free sea surface temperature (SST) product of the Mediterranean Sea is presented. The reconstruction of the data set missing information (due to clouds, for example) is realised using DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions). DINEOF is an EOF-based technique that does no need a priori information about the data set (such as signal to noise ratio, or correlation length) and that has shown to be faster and equally reliable than other widely used techniques for reconstructing missing data, such as optimal interpolation. Here we present a daily reconstruction of the Western Mediterranean SST. Cloudy data are downloaded from the Ifremer Medspiration ftp site. After extracting the data from the study zone, they are added to a data set containing the last 6 months of SST. A first DINEOF reconstruction is performed to identify outliers, i.e. pixels for which the analysis-observation difference (the residuals) are larger than the statistically expected misfit calculated during the analysis. Proximity to a cloud edge and deviation respect to a local median also penalize a pixel in the outlier classification. These outliers are removed from the original data set, and a second DINEOF reconstruction is performed, along with the calculation of error maps. Plots are realised, and the reconstruction of the latest 10 days is shown at http://gher-diva.phys.ulg.ac.be/DINEOF/dineof.html, together with the original data, the error maps and identified outliers. The whole procedure takes less than two hours and has been running automatically for more than 5 months. This product is intended as a demonstration of the capabilities of DINEOF as a near-real time technique to reconstruct missing data in satellite data sets. This procedure can be easily applied to other variables and other geographical zones. [less ▲]

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See detailCloud-free satellite data for operational applications using DINEOF
Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg; Sirjacobs, Damien ULg et al

Conference (2010, February 24)

DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions) is an EOF-based technique to reconstruct missing data in satellite data sets, such as gaps created by the presence of clouds. It is parameter ... [more ▼]

DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions) is an EOF-based technique to reconstruct missing data in satellite data sets, such as gaps created by the presence of clouds. It is parameter-free, meaning that no a priori information is needed (such as signal to noise ratio, or correlation length) to calculate the missing data: this information is extracted from the data through the EOF decomposition. In addition, computational time is lower than for other frequently used techniques to reconstruct missing data in satellites, such as optimal interpolation. Multivariate reconstructions can be also done, using extended EOFs. These characteristics make DINEOF very suitable for operational reconstruction of satellite data. Recently added to DINEOF is a technique to filter the temporal covariance matrix which allows to reduce spurious variability in the temporal EOFs, and therefore leads to improved reconstructions. We will present a general description of the technology, with examples of applications to different variables. We will also give an example of a near real time reconstruction of sea surface temperature in the western Mediterranean Sea. Conceived as a demonstration product for DINEOF, it is hosted at http://gher-diva.phys.ulg.ac.be/DINEOF/dineof.html and it is automatically updated daily, presenting the cloud-free sea surface temperature for the last ten days, as well as the original data, outliers and error fields. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailEnsemble perturbation smoother for optimizing tidal boundary conditions by assimilation of High-Frequency radar surface currents - application to the German Bight
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Gurgel, Klaus-Werner et al

in Ocean Science (2010), 6(1), 161-178

High-Frequency (HF) radars measure the ocean surface currents at various spatial and temporal scales. These include tidal currents, wind-driven circulation, density-driven circulation and Stokes drift ... [more ▼]

High-Frequency (HF) radars measure the ocean surface currents at various spatial and temporal scales. These include tidal currents, wind-driven circulation, density-driven circulation and Stokes drift. Sequential assimilation methods updating the model state have been proven successful to correct the density-driven currents by assimilation of observations such as sea surface height, sea surface temperature and in-situ profiles. However, the situation is different for tides in coastal models since these are not generated within the domain, but are rather propagated inside the domain through the boundary conditions. For improving the modeled tidal variability it is therefore not sufficient to update the model state via data assimilation without updating the boundary conditions. The optimization of boundary conditions to match observations inside the domain is traditionally achieved through variational assimilation methods. In this work we present an ensemble smoother to improve the tidal boundary values so that the model represents more closely the observed currents. To create an ensemble of dynamically realistic boundary conditions, a cost function is formulated which is directly related to the probability of each boundary condition perturbation. This cost function ensures that the boundary condition perturbations are spatially smooth and that the structure of the perturbations satisfies approximately the harmonic linearized shallow water equations. Based on those perturbations an ensemble simulation is carried out using the full three-dimensional General Estuarine Ocean Model (GETM). Optimized boundary values are obtained by assimilating all observations using the covariances of the ensemble simulation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (11 ULg)
See detailEnsemble-based assimilation of high-frequency radar surface currents in regional ocean models
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg et al

Conference (2010)

The results of coastal ocean models depend critically on the accuracy of boundary and initial conditions and atmospheric forcing. The precision of coastal ocean models is limited among others by ... [more ▼]

The results of coastal ocean models depend critically on the accuracy of boundary and initial conditions and atmospheric forcing. The precision of coastal ocean models is limited among others by uncertainty in those forcing fields. Since high-frequency (HF) radar installations provide measurements over a relatively large area, the assimilation of these data has a high potential to reduce the errors in ocean models and to provide a dynamically consistent estimation of the ocean circulation. The assimilation of HF radar data is not without its own challenges: the spatial variation of the surface currents uncertainty, the high temporal resolution of HF radar data, the simultaneous presence of a wide range of processes with distinct spatial and temporal scales (tides and other surface gravity waves, mesoscale and wind-driven circulation), and the generally strong sensitivity of regional models to errors in the boundary conditions and atmospheric forcings. These processess are important aspects to consider in the application of data assimilation methods to HF radar measurements. The results of two data assimilation experiments on the West Florida Shelf (WFS) and the German Bight are presented. HF radar currents are assimilated in a nested West Florida Shelf based on an ensemble of model realizations with different wind forcings. The model is sequentially updated and a filter is implemented to reduce spurious surface-gravity waves. Results of the WFS model assimilating surface currents show an improvement of the model currents not only at the surface but also at depth compared to independent ADCP observations. This West Florida Shelf assimilation experiment does not include tides. Tides are not generated within the domain, but are rather propagated inside the domain through the boundary conditions. The potential of using HF radar data to reduce errors in tidal boundary conditions is shown in a model setup of the German Bight. For improving the modeled tidal variability it is not sufficient to update the model state without updating the boundary conditions. An ensemble smoother to improve the tidal boundary values is presented and validated with independent HF radar measurements and tide-gage data. The ensemble-scheme is also applied to improve the wind forcing by assimilation of surface currents. The improvement of the analyzed wind forcing is assessed by using in-situ wind measurements. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
See detailEnsemble smoother for optimizing tidal boundary conditions and wind forcing by assimilation of High-Frequency Radar surface currents measurements of the German Bight
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Staneva, Joanna et al

Conference (2010)

An ensemble smoother scheme is presented to assimilate HF radar surface currents to improve tidal boundary conditions and wind forcings of a circulation model of the German Bight. To create an ensemble of ... [more ▼]

An ensemble smoother scheme is presented to assimilate HF radar surface currents to improve tidal boundary conditions and wind forcings of a circulation model of the German Bight. To create an ensemble of dynamically realistic tidal boundary conditions, a cost function is formulated which is directly related to the probability of each perturbation. This cost function ensures that the perturbations are spatially smooth and that the structure of the perturbations satisfies approximately the harmonic linearized shallow water equations. Based on those perturbations an ensemble simulation is carried out using the full three-dimensional General Estuarine Ocean Model (GETM). Optimized boundary values are obtained using all observations within the assimilation period using the covariances of the ensemble simulation. The approach acts like a smoother scheme since all observations are taken into account. Since the scheme aims to derive the optimal perturbation, it might be called Ensemble Perturbation Smoother. The final analysis is obtained by rerunning the model using the optimal perturbation to the boundary conditions. The analyzed model solution satisfies thus the model equations exactly and does not suffer from spurious adjustments often observed with sequential assimilation schemes. Model results are also compared to independent tide gage data. The assimilation did also reduce the model error compared to those sea level observations. The same scheme has also been used to correct surface winds. Surface winds are crucial for accurately modeling the marine circulation in coastal waters. The method is validated directly by comparing the analyzed wind speed to in situ measurements and indirectly by assessing the impact of the corrected winds on sea surface temperature (SST) relative to satellite SST. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of tidal boundary conditions and surface winds by assimilation of high-frequency radar surface currents in the German Bight
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Gurgel, Klaus-Werner et al

Conference (2010)

Numerical ocean models are affected by errors of various origins: errors in the initial conditions, boundary conditions and atmospheric forcings, uncertainties in the turbulence parametrization and ... [more ▼]

Numerical ocean models are affected by errors of various origins: errors in the initial conditions, boundary conditions and atmospheric forcings, uncertainties in the turbulence parametrization and discretization errors. In data assimilation, observations are used to reduce the uncertainty in the model solution. Ensemble-based assimilation schemes are often implemented such that the expected error of the model solution is minimized. It is shown that the observations can also be used to obtain improved estimates of the, in general, poorly known boundary conditions and atmospheric forcings. An ensemble smoother scheme is presented to assimilate high-frequency (HF) radar surface currents to improve tidal boundary conditions and wind forcings of a circulation model of the German Bight. To create an ensemble of dynamically realistic tidal boundary conditions, a cost function is formulated which is directly related to the probability of each perturbation. This cost function ensures that the perturbations are spatially smooth and that the structure of the perturbations satisfies approximately the harmonic linearized shallow water equations. Based on those perturbations an ensemble simulation is carried out using the full three-dimensional General Estuarine Ocean Model (GETM). Optimized boundary values are obtained using all observations within the assimilation period using the covariances of the ensemble simulation. The approach acts like a smoother scheme since past and future observations are taken into account. The final analysis is obtained by rerunning the model using the optimal perturbation of the boundary conditions. The analyzed model solution satisfies thus the model equations exactly and does not suffer from spurious adjustments often observed with sequential assimilation schemes. Model results are also compared to independent tide gauge data. The assimilation also reduces the model error compared to those sea level observations. The same scheme is also used to correct surface winds. Surface winds are crucial for accurately modeling the marine circulation in coastal waters. The method is validated directly by comparing the analyzed wind speed to in situ measurements and indirectly by assessing the impact of the corrected winds on sea surface temperature (SST) relative to satellite SST. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (5 ULg)
See detailAssimilation of high-frequency radar surface currents measurements to optimize tidal boundary conditions and wind forcing
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Gurgel, Klaus-Werner et al

Conference (2010)

An ensemble smoother scheme is presented to assimilate high-frequency (HF) radar surface currents to improve tidal boundary conditions and wind forcings of a circulation model of the German Bight. To ... [more ▼]

An ensemble smoother scheme is presented to assimilate high-frequency (HF) radar surface currents to improve tidal boundary conditions and wind forcings of a circulation model of the German Bight. To create an ensemble of dynamically realistic tidal boundary conditions, a cost function is formulated which is directly related to the probability of each perturbation. This cost function ensures that the perturbations are spatially smooth and that the structure of the perturbations satisfies approximately the harmonic linearized shallow water equations. Based on those perturbations an ensemble simulation is carried out using the full three-dimensional General Estuarine Ocean Model (GETM). Optimized boundary values are obtained using all observations within the assimilation period using the covariances of the ensemble simulation. The approach acts like a smoother scheme since past and future observations are taken into account. The final analysis is obtained by rerunning the model using the optimal perturbation of the boundary conditions. The analyzed model solution satisfies thus the model equations exactly and does not suffer from spurious adjustments often observed with sequential assimilation schemes. Model results are also compared to independent tide gage data. The assimilation also reduces the model error compared to those sea level observations. The same scheme is also used to correct surface winds. Surface winds are crucial for accurately modeling the marine circulation in coastal waters. The method is validated directly by comparing the analyzed wind speed to in situ measurements and indirectly by assessing the impact of the corrected winds on sea surface temperature (SST) relative to satellite SST. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
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See detailDIVA: new features
Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

Scientific conference (2009, October 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (3 ULg)
See detailEnsemble smoother for optimizing tidal boundary conditions and bottom roughness by assimilation of High-Frequency Radar surface currents
Barth, Alexander ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Staneva, J. et al

Conference (2009, September)

High-Frequency (HF) radars measure the ocean currents at various spatial and temporal scales. These include tidal currents, wind-driven circulation, density-driven circulation and Stokes drift. Sequential ... [more ▼]

High-Frequency (HF) radars measure the ocean currents at various spatial and temporal scales. These include tidal currents, wind-driven circulation, density-driven circulation and Stokes drift. Sequential assimilation methods updating the model state have been proven successful to correct the density-driven currents by assimilation of observations such as sea surface height, sea surface temperature and in-situ profiles. However, the situation is different for tides in coastal models since these are not generated within the domain, but are rather propagated inside the domain through the boundary conditions. For improving the modeled tidal variability it is therefore not sufficient to update the model state via data assimilation without updating the boundary conditions. The optimization of boundary conditions to match observations inside the domain is traditionally achieved through variational assimilation methods. In this work we present an ensemble smoother to improve the tidal boundary values so that the model represents more closely the observed currents. To create an ensemble of dynamically realistic boundary conditions, a cost function is formulated which is directly related to the probability of each perturbation. This cost function ensures that the perturbations are spatially smooth and that the structure of the perturbations satisfies approximately the harmonic linearized shallow water equations. Based on those perturbations an ensemble simulation is carried out using the full three-dimension General Estuarine Ocean Model (GETM). Optimized boundary values are obtained using all observations within the assimilation period using the covariances of the ensemble simulation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (10 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailSuper-Ensemble techniques: application to surface drift prediction
Vandenbulcke, Luc ULg; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg; Lenartz, Fabian ULg et al

in Progress in Oceanography (2009), 82(3), 149-167

The prediction of surface drift of floating objects is an important task, with applications such as marine transport, pollutant dispersion, and search-and-rescue activities. But forecasting even the drift ... [more ▼]

The prediction of surface drift of floating objects is an important task, with applications such as marine transport, pollutant dispersion, and search-and-rescue activities. But forecasting even the drift of surface waters is very challenging, because it depends on complex interactions of currents driven by the wind, the wave field and the general prevailing circulation. Furthermore, although each of those can be forecasted by deterministic models, the latter all suffer from limitations, resulting in imperfect predictions. In the present study, we try and predict the drift of two buoys launched during the DART06 (Dynamics of the Adriatic sea in Real-Time 2006) and MREA07 (Maritime Rapid Environmental Assessment 2007) sea trials, using the so-called hyper-ensemble technique: different models are combined in order to minimize departure from independent observations during a training period; the obtained combination is then used in forecasting mode. We review and try out different hyper-ensemble techniques, such as the simple ensemble mean, least-squares weighted linear combinations, and techniques based on data assimilation, which dynamically update the model’s weights in the combination when new observations become available. We show that the latter methods alleviate the need of fixing the training length a priori, as older information is automatically discarded. When the forecast period is relatively short (12 h), the discussed methods lead to much smaller forecasting errors compared with individual models (at least three times smaller), with the dynamic methods leading to the best results. When many models are available, errors can be further reduced by removing colinearities between them by performing a principal component analysis. At the same time, this reduces the amount of weights to be determined. In complex environments when meso- and smaller scale eddy activity is strong, such as the Ligurian Sea, the skill of individual models may vary over time periods smaller than the forecasting period (e.g. when the latter is 36 h). In these cases, a simpler method such as a fixed linear combination or a simple ensemble mean may lead to the smallest forecast errors. In environments where surface currents have strong mean-kinetic energies (e.g. the Western Adriatic Current), dynamic methods can be particularly successful in predicting the drift of surface waters. In any case, the dynamic hyper-ensemble methods allow to estimate a characteristic time during which the model weights are more or less stable, which allows predicting how long the obtained combination will be valid in forecasting mode, and hence to choose which hyper-ensemble method one should use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (26 ULg)
See detailHF radar observations of surface currents in the German Bight: descriptive analysis, model-data comparison and non-sequential ensemble data assimilation
Port, A.; Staneva, J.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J. et al

Conference (2009, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (2 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailUS GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)
Chassignet, E. P.; Hurlburt, H. E.; Metzger, E. J. et al

in Oceanography (2009), 22(2), 64-75

During the past five to ten years, a broad partnership of institutions under NOPP sponsorship has collaborated in developing and demonstrating the performance and application of eddy-resolving, real-time ... [more ▼]

During the past five to ten years, a broad partnership of institutions under NOPP sponsorship has collaborated in developing and demonstrating the performance and application of eddy-resolving, real-time global- and basin-scale ocean prediction systems using the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). The partnership represents a broad spectrum of the oceanographic community, bringing together academia, federal agencies, and industry/commercial entities, and spanning modeling, data assimilation, data management and serving, observational capabilities, and application of HYCOM prediction system outputs. In addition to providing real-time, eddy-resolving global- and basin-scale ocean prediction systems for the US Navy and NOAA, this project also offered an outstanding opportunity for NOAA-Navy collaboration and cooperation, ranging from research to the operational level. This paper provides an overview of the global HYCOM ocean prediction system and highlights some of its achievements. An important outcome of this effort is the capability of the global system to provide boundary conditions to even higherresolution regional and coastal models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (7 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolution of Western Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperature between 1985 and 2005
Troupin, Charles ULg; Lenartz, Fabian; Sirjacobs, Damien ULg et al

Conference (2009, April 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (3 ULg)