References of "Baron, Frédéric"
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See detailActualités thérapeutiques en hématologie.
De Prijck, Bernard ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(5-6), 384-90

This article focuses on recent advances in four important areas of hematology: aggressive lymphomas, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, multiple myeloma, and molecular therapy of cancer.

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See detailEvaluation clinique de la fonction du thymus.
Castermans, Emilie ULg; Morrhaye, Gabriel ULg; Marchand, S. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(11), 675-8

The essential role of the thymus is to install an extremely diverse repertoire of T lymphocytes that are self-tolerant and competent against non-self, as well as to generate self-antigen specific ... [more ▼]

The essential role of the thymus is to install an extremely diverse repertoire of T lymphocytes that are self-tolerant and competent against non-self, as well as to generate self-antigen specific regulatory T cells (Treg) able to inactivate in periphery self-reactive T cells having escaped the thymic censorship. Although indirect, techniques of medical imaging and phenotyping of peripheral T cells may help in the investigation of thymic function. Nowadays however, thymopoiesis is better evaluated through quantification by PCR of T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) generated by intrathymic random recombination of the gene segments coding for the variable parts of the T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR). The TREC methodology is very valuable in the circumstances not associated with intense proliferation or apoptosis of peripheral T lymphocytes. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation de la thymopoiese: applications cliniques.
Castermans, Emilie ULg; Morrhaye, Gabriel ULg; Marchand, S. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(12), 725-9

In the precedent article, we have described how T-cell generation in the thymus (thymopoiesis) may be currently evaluated through quantification by PCR of T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) generated ... [more ▼]

In the precedent article, we have described how T-cell generation in the thymus (thymopoiesis) may be currently evaluated through quantification by PCR of T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) generated by intrathymic random recombination of the gene segments coding for variable parts of T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR). In hematology, TREC methodology helps in a better understanding of immune reconstitution after graft of hematopoietic stem cells: first there is a proliferation of mature T cells present in the graft, then a differentiation of naive T cells. In geriatrics, the homeostasis of the peripheral T-cell repertoire is maintained through proliferation of peripheral memory T cells rather than through thymic generation of naive T cells. In addition, TREC quantification constitutes a novel major tool for deciphering the tight control of thymopoiesis by the neuroendocrine system. [less ▲]

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See detailLes cellules souches mesenchymateuses: une nouvelle therapeutique polyvalente.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Gothot, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62 Spec No

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reside in the stromal compartment of the hematopoietic bone marrow. Although present in small numbers in vivo, MSC may be easily isolated and expanded in cell culture. MSC are ... [more ▼]

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reside in the stromal compartment of the hematopoietic bone marrow. Although present in small numbers in vivo, MSC may be easily isolated and expanded in cell culture. MSC are able to generate bone, cartilage, fat, and under specific conditions, liver, muscle and nerve. Numerous studies have suggested a potential use of MSC to repair degenerative or traumatic lesions, in organs where tissue repair is limited. Furthermore, MSC are endowed with immunosuppressive properties, utilized to control graft versus host disease and rejection of allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplants. [less ▲]

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See detailUnrelated donor status and high donor age independently affect immunologic recovery after nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storer, Barry; Maris, Michael B. et al

in Biology of Blood & Marrow Transplantation (2006), 12(11), 1176-1187

The risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is higher after HLA-matched unrelated donor (URD) than after HLA-matched related donor (MRD) nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We ... [more ▼]

The risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is higher after HLA-matched unrelated donor (URD) than after HLA-matched related donor (MRD) nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We therefore investigated factors affecting immune recovery in 94 patients given HCT from MRDs (n = 51) and URDs (n = 43) after 2-Gy total body irradiation with or without fludarabine and postgrafting immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine. CD4 T cells counts remained below normal values during the first year after HCT in both patient groups. This included abnormally low counts each of naive CD4 T cells and memory CD4 T cells. Conversely, CD8 T cell counts reached the 10th percentile of normal 6 months after HCT in MRD and URD recipients. On day 30 after HCT, URD recipients had lower counts of B cells (P = .02), naive CD4 T cells (P = .04), memory CD4 T cells (P = .005), memory CD8 T cells (P = .005), and CMV-specific T helper cells (P = .007) than had MRD recipients. This delay in CMV-specific immune reconstitution translated into increased frequency of CMV antigenemia among URD recipients during the first 100 days after HCT. Older donor age was associated with low counts of naive CD4 T cells on days 180-365 after HCT (P = .003). Further, low numbers of T cells and CD34(+) cells in the graft and development of acute graft-versus-host disease were associated with impaired immune recovery of naive CD4 T cells and B cells. In summary, immunologic recovery was poor the first year after nonmyeloablative conditioning and was delayed among URD recipients in comparison with MRD recipients. Other factors significantly associated with delayed immune recovery were advanced donor age, low numbers of CD34 and T cells in the graft, and development of graft-versus-host disease. (C) 2006 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailChimerism and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Sandmaier, B. M.

in Leukemia (2006), 20(10), 1690-1700

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation ( HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning has been extensively evaluated in patients with hematologic malignancies who are ineligible for conventional ... [more ▼]

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation ( HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning has been extensively evaluated in patients with hematologic malignancies who are ineligible for conventional HCT because of age or medical comorbidities. Nonmyeloablative regimens have led to an initial state of mixed hematopoietic chimerism defined as coexistence of donor- and host-derived hematopoiesis. While nonmyeloablative regimens have been associated with reduced regimen-related toxicities in comparison with conventional myeloablative conditioning, graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease ( GVHD), and disease progression have remained significant challenges. In this article, after briefly introducing current techniques for chimerism assessment, we describe factors affecting donor chimerism levels after nonmyeloablative conditioning, and then review data suggesting that chimerism assessment early after HCT might help identify patients at risk for graft rejection, GVHD and relapse/progression. Finally, we discuss how these observations have opened the way to further research protocols evaluating manipulation of postgrafting immunosuppression, and/or infusion of donor immune cells. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors associated with outcomes in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning after failed myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, R.; Storer, B. E. et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2006), 24(25), 4150-4157

Purpose Several studies have investigated the feasibility of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) after reduced-intensity conditioning in patients who experienced relapse after ... [more ▼]

Purpose Several studies have investigated the feasibility of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) after reduced-intensity conditioning in patients who experienced relapse after myeloablative HCT. Although most studies showed relatively low nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rates and encouraging short-term results, it has yet to be defined which patients would benefit most from these approaches. Patients and Methods We analyzed data from 147 patients with hematologic malignancies who experienced treatment failure with conventional autologous (n = 135), allogeneic (n = 10), or syngeneic (n = 2) HCT and were treated with HLA-matched related (n = 62) or unrelated (n = 85) grafts after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation with or without fludarabine. Results Three-year probabilities of NRM, relapse, and overall survival were 32%, 48%, and 27%, respectively, for related recipients, and 28%, 44%, and 44%, respectively, for unrelated recipients. The best outcomes were observed in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, whereas patients with multiple myeloma and Hodgkin's disease had worse outcomes as a result of high incidences of relapse and progression. Being in partial remission (PR) or complete remission (CR) at HCT (P = .002) and developing chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; P = .03) resulted in lower risks of relapse and progression. Factors associated with better overall survival were PR or CR (P = .01) and lack of comorbidity (P = .03) at HCT and absence of acute GVHD after HCT (P = .06). Conclusion Encouraging outcomes were seen with allogeneic HCT after nonmyeloablative conditioning in selected patients who had experienced relapse after a high-dose HCT, particularly in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Results with unrelated grafts were comparable with results with related grafts. [less ▲]

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See detailFailure of donor lymphocyte infusion to prevent graft rejection in dogs given DLA-identical marrow after I Gy of total body irradiation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Sandmaier, B. M.; Zellmer, E. et al

in Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (2006), 12(8), 813-817

We investigated in a preclinical canine model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) whether preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) given 1 month after HCT could prevent late graft rejection that ... [more ▼]

We investigated in a preclinical canine model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) whether preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) given 1 month after HCT could prevent late graft rejection that was the rule in historical dogs given suboptimal conditioning with 1 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) before and immunosuppression with cyclosporine (CSP) and either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; n = 6) or rapamycin (n = 5) after dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical marrow transplantation. Nine dogs given DLA-identical marrow after I Gy of TBI followed by postgrafting MMF and CSP were studied. A single DLI was given 28-36 days after HCT, either with (n = 5) or without (n = 4) preceding treatment with the immunosuppressive drug pentostatin. Two of the 4 dogs given DLI only maintained stable mixed donor-host chimera beyond 30 weeks after HCT, whereas 2 rejected their grafts, on weeks 10 and 15 after HCT. One of the 5 dogs given pentostatin before DLI maintained a stable mixed donor-host chimera beyond 30 weeks, whereas 4 rejected their grafts, at weeks 8, 12, 12, and 16 after HCT. The 30-week probability of stable mixed chimerism, was 33% among dogs given DLI, versus 0% among 11 historical dogs (P = .003). In conclusion, DLI was only moderately effective in preventing graft rejection in this model. Additional immunosuppression with pentostatin did not improve that outcome. The model might be useful in developing potential strategies aimed at preventing graft rejection in patients with low donor chimerism, levels. (C) 2006 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailAllogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning as treatment for hematologic malignancies and inherited blood disorders
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, R.

in Molecular therapy (2006), 13(1), 26-41

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after myeloablative conditioning regimens has been an effective treatment for many patients with hematologic malignancies or inherited blood disorders ... [more ▼]

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after myeloablative conditioning regimens has been an effective treatment for many patients with hematologic malignancies or inherited blood disorders. Unfortunately, such regimens have been associated with significant toxicity, limiting their use to otherwise healthy, relatively young patients. In an attempt to extend treatment by allogeneic HCT to older patients and those with comorbid conditions, several groups of investigators have developed reduced-intensity or truly nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens, lacking such toxicity. Analogous to conventional regimens, reduced-intensity regimens both eliminated host-versus-graft (rejection) reactions and produced major anti-tumor effects. In contrast, nonmyeloablative regimens have relied on optimizing both pre-and posttransplant immunosuppression to overcome host-versus-g raft reactions, while anti-tumor responses have depended mainly on immune-mediated graft-versus-tumor effects. In this review, we define reduced-intensity and truly nonmyeloablative regimens, describe the preclinical development and clinical application of a very low intensity nonmyeloablative regimen, and review results with reduced-intensity regimens in patients with hematologic malignancies or inherited blood disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailThe immune system as a foundation for immunologic therapy and hematologic malignancies: a historical perspective.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, Rainer

in Bailliere's Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology = Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology (2006), 19(4), 637-53

In this review we aim to provide a historical overview of the immunotherapeutic approaches which have been developed for the treatment of hematological malignancies. After briefly summarizing the ... [more ▼]

In this review we aim to provide a historical overview of the immunotherapeutic approaches which have been developed for the treatment of hematological malignancies. After briefly summarizing the development of the theory of cancer immune surveillance, we describe how initial studies discovering the efficacy of the immune-mediated graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation led to new transplantation approaches (termed non-myeloablative transplantation) relying almost exclusively on graft-versus-tumor effects for tumor eradication. We then summarize important steps in the development of tumor vaccines and autologous adoptive immunotherapy in patients with hematological malignancies. Finally, we describe historical discoveries leading to the recent success with monoclonal antibodies as treatment for lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia. [less ▲]

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See detailDespite inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell growth in vitro, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib does not impair engraftment of human CD133+ cells into NOD/SCIDbeta2mNull mice.
Pirson, Laurence ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Meuris, Nathalie ULg et al

in Stem Cells (2006), 24(7), 1814-21

There is potential interest for combining allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and particularly allogeneic HCT with a nonmyeloablative regimen, to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib ... [more ▼]

There is potential interest for combining allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and particularly allogeneic HCT with a nonmyeloablative regimen, to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (Glivec; Novartis, Basel, Switzerland, http://www.novartis.com) in order to maximize anti-leukemic activity against Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias. However, because imatinib inhibits c-kit, the stem cell factor receptor, it could interfere with bone marrow engraftment. In this study, we examined the impact of imatinib on normal progenitor cell function. Imatinib decreased the colony-forming capacity of mobilized peripheral blood human CD133(+) cells but not that of long-term culture-initiating cells. Imatinib also decreased the proliferation of cytokine-stimulated CD133(+) cells but did not induce apoptosis of these cells. Expression of very late antigen (VLA)-4, VLA-5, and CXCR4 of CD133(+) cells was not modified by imatinib, but imatinib decreased the ability of CD133(+) cells to migrate. Finally, imatinib did not decrease engraftment of CD133(+) cells into irradiated nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient/beta2m(null) mice conditioned with 3 or 1 Gy total body irradiation. In summary, our results suggest that, despite inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell growth in vitro, imatinib does not interfere with hematopoietic stem cell engraftment. [less ▲]

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See detailExtending postgrafting cyclosporine decreases the risk of severe graft-versus-host disease after nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation
Burroughs, Lauri; Mielcarek, Marco; Leisenring, Wendy et al

in Transplantation (2006), 81(6), 818-25

BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether the duration of systemic immunosuppressive treatment after allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) might influence the incidence, severity ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether the duration of systemic immunosuppressive treatment after allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) might influence the incidence, severity, timing, and/or corticosteroid-responsiveness of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed outcomes among 185 patients with hematologic malignancies who were given grafts from HLA-matched related donors following conditioning with 2 Gy total body irradiation alone or in combination with fludarabine between December 1998 and March 2003. Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of mycophenolate mofetil (days 0-27) in combination with 3 different cyclosporine (CSP) regimens: taper from (A) days 35 to 56 (n=107), (B) days 56 to 77 (n=35), and (C) days 56 to 180 (n=43). RESULTS: The overall incidences of grades II-IV and III-IV acute GVHD, and extensive chronic GVHD were 52%, 13%, and 56%, respectively. The duration of CSP prophylaxis did not significantly influence the overall rate of acute GVHD (grade II-IV), extensive chronic GVHD, or non-relapse mortality. However, prolonged administration of CSP (group C) was associated with a significantly decreased hazard of grades III-IV acute GVHD (HR 0.2, 95% CI [0.04, 0.9]) and with an increased likelihood of discontinuing all systemic immunosuppression (HR 2.4, 95% CI [1.1, 5.2]) when compared to the shortest course of CSP (group A). CONCLUSION: Longer CSP duration decreased the risk of severe GVHD and increased the likelihood of discontinuing all systemic immunosuppression after nonmyeloablative HCT with HLA-matched related grafts. [less ▲]

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See detailRecombinant human erythropoietin therapy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen: low donor chimerism predicts for poor response.
Vanstraelen, Gaëtan; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Willems, Evelyne ULg et al

in Experimental hematology (2006), 34(7), 841-50

PURPOSE: After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMHCT), many patients experience prolonged anemia and require red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. We ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMHCT), many patients experience prolonged anemia and require red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. We enrolled 60 consecutive patients undergoing NMHCT in a phase II trial to determine the optimal utilization of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in this setting. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The first 14 NMHCT recipients did not receive rHuEPO (control group). Nineteen patients were scheduled to start rHuEPO on day 0 (EPO group 2) and 27 patients on day 28 after the transplant (EPO group 1). RHuEPO was administered subcutaneously once weekly at a dose of 500 U/kg/wk with the aim of achieving hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 13 g/dL. The 3 groups were well balanced for major characteristics. RESULTS: During the first month (p < 0.0001) as well as days 30 to 100 (p < 0.0001) and days 100 to 180 (p < 0.0001), Hb values were higher in patients receiving rHuEPO compared to those not receiving it. However, transfusion requirements were significantly decreased only in the first month in EPO group 2 (p = 0.0169). T-cell chimerism above 60% on day 42 was the best predictor of Hb response (p < 0.0001) or Hb correction (p = 0.0217), but myeloid chimerism above 90% also predicted for Hb response (p = 0.0069). Hb response was also decreased in patients receiving CD8-depleted grafts and increased in the few patients not receiving TBI, but only in univariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia after NMHCT is sensitive to rHuEPO therapy, but less so than after conventional allogeneic HCT. RHuEPO decreases transfusion requirements only in the first 30 days posttransplant. T-cell chimerism below 60% on day 42 impaired Hb response, suggesting possible inhibition of donor erythropoiesis by residual recipient lymphocytes. A prospective randomized trial should be performed with rHuEPO starting on the day of transplantation to assess its clinical benefit in terms of transfusion requirements and quality of life. [less ▲]

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See detailInfections after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen.
Frere, Pascale ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Bonnet, Christophe ULg et al

in Bone Marrow Transplantation (2006), 37(4), 411-8

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMSCT) may be associated with a reduced risk of infection compared to standard allogeneic HCT. We retrospectively analyzed ... [more ▼]

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning (NMSCT) may be associated with a reduced risk of infection compared to standard allogeneic HCT. We retrospectively analyzed incidence and risk factors of infection in 62 patients undergoing NMSCT with low-dose TBI +/- fludarabine and postgrafting CsA and MMF. The proportion of patients with any infection was 77%, but the majority of infectious events occurred beyond day 30. Donor other than sibling, older age, early disease and male gender were significant risk factors. The incidence of bacteremia was 55% at 1 year and the number of bacteremic episodes was 0.9 per patient (0.08 before day 30). The risk of bacteremia increased with older age and the use of a donor other than an HLA-identical sibling, but not with neutropenia. The incidence of infections other than bacteremia correlated with the use of corticosteroids. The risk of CMV infection increased with high-risk CMV serology, and risk of CMV disease with high-risk CMV serology, older age, first transplantation and a diagnosis of lymphoma. In conclusion, after NMSCT, infections are not frequent in the first 30 days post transplant but careful long-term monitoring is necessary thereafter. [less ▲]

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See detailTransfusions after nonmyeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Vanstraelen, Gaëtan; Beguin, Yves ULg

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (2006), 20(12), 2081-6

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See detailImpact of Imatinib on immune function in vitro
Pirson, Laurence ULg; Baron, Frédéric ULg; Gothot, André ULg et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailCurrent status of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Sandmaier, B. M.

in Current Opinion in Hematology (2005), 12(6), 435-443

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See detailHigh doses of transplanted CD34(+) cells are associated with rapid T-cell engraftment and lessened risk of graft rejection, but not more graft-versus-host disease after nonmyeloablative conditioning and unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, M. B.; Storer, B. E. et al

in Leukemia (2005), 19(5), 822-828

This report examines the impact of graft composition on outcomes in 130 patients with hematological malignancies given unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor-mobilized peripheral blood ... [more ▼]

This report examines the impact of graft composition on outcomes in 130 patients with hematological malignancies given unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (G-PBMC) ( n = 116) or marrow ( n = 14) transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 90 mg/m(2) fludarabine and 2Gy TBI. The median number of CD34(+) cells transplanted was 6.5 x 10(6)/ kg. Higher numbers of grafted CD14(+) ( P = 0.0008), CD3(+) ( P = 0.0007), CD4(+) ( P = 0.001), CD8(+) ( P = 0.004), CD3 - CD56(+) ( P = 0.003), and CD34(+) ( P = 0.0001) cells were associated with higher levels of day 28 donor T-cell chimerism. Higher numbers of CD14(+) ( P = 0.01) and CD34(+) ( P = 0.0003) cells were associated with rapid achievement of complete donor T-cell chimerism, while high numbers of CD8(+) ( P = 0.005) and CD34(+) ( P = 0.01) cells were associated with low probabilities of graft rejection. When analyses were restricted to G-PBMC recipients, higher numbers of grafted CD34(+) cells were associated with higher levels of day 28 donor T-cell chimerism ( P = 0.01), rapid achievement of complete donor T-cell chimerism ( P = 0.02), and a trend for lower risk for graft rejection ( P = 0.14). There were no associations between any cell subsets and acute or chronic GVHD nor relapse/progression. These data suggest more rapid engraftment of donor T cells and reduced rejection rates could be achieved by increasing the doses of CD34(+) cells in unrelated grafts administered after nonmyeloablative conditioning. [less ▲]

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