References of "Balthazart, Jacques"
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See detailDissociable effects of social context on song and doublecortin immunoreactivity in male canaries.
Alward, Beau A.; Mayes, Wade D.; Peng, Katherine et al

in The European journal of neuroscience (2014), 40(6), 2941-7

Variation in environmental factors such as day length and social context greatly affects reproductive behavior and the brain areas that regulate these behaviors. One such behavior is song in songbirds ... [more ▼]

Variation in environmental factors such as day length and social context greatly affects reproductive behavior and the brain areas that regulate these behaviors. One such behavior is song in songbirds, which males use to attract a mate during the breeding season. In these species the absence of a potential mate leads to an increase in the number of songs produced, while the presence of a mate greatly diminishes singing. Interestingly, although long days promote song behavior, producing song itself can promote the incorporation of new neurons in brain regions controlling song output. Social context can also affect such neuroplasticity in these song control nuclei. The goal of the present study was to investigate in canaries (Serinus canaria), a songbird species, how photoperiod and social context affect song and the incorporation of new neurons, as measured by the microtubule-associated protein doublecortin (DCX) in HVC, a key vocal production brain region of the song control system. We show that long days increased HVC size and singing activity. In addition, male canaries paired with a female for 2 weeks showed enhanced DCX-immunoreactivity in HVC relative to birds housed alone. Strikingly, however, paired males sang fewer songs that exhibited a reduction in acoustic features such as song complexity and energy, compared with birds housed alone, which sang prolifically. These results show that social presence plays a significant role in the regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity in songbirds and can exert these effects in opposition to what might be expected based on activity-induced neurogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailFos expression in monoaminergic cell groups in response to sociosexual interactions in male and female Japanese quail.
Iyilikci, Onur; Baxter, Samantha; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in Behavioral neuroscience (2014), 128(1), 48-60

Monoaminergic neurotransmitters regulate different components of sexual behaviors, but how the different monoaminergic cell groups selectively regulate these behaviors is not well understood. We examined ... [more ▼]

Monoaminergic neurotransmitters regulate different components of sexual behaviors, but how the different monoaminergic cell groups selectively regulate these behaviors is not well understood. We examined the potential contribution of these different cell groups in the control of different aspects of sexual behaviors in male and female quail. We used double-label immunohistochemistry, labeling the protein product of the immediate early gene, Fos, along with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), markers for catecholaminergic or indolaminergic cells, respectively. Rhythmic Cloacal Sphincter Movements (RCSM) were recorded as a measure of male appetitive sexual behavior. Consummatory sexual behaviors were evaluated based on the species-typical copulation sequence. Enhanced Fos expression in the medial preoptic nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis was observed in association with both physical and visual contact to the opposite sex for males, but not for females. Fos induction associated with physical contact was observed in the ventral tegmental area and anterior periaqueductal gray in both sexes. In males only, the number of Fos-immunoreactive (ir) cells increased in the visual contact condition in these 2 dopaminergic cell groups, however no significant effect was observed for double-labeled TH-Fos-ir cells. In addition, consummatory but not appetitive sexual behavior increased Fos expression in TPH-ir cells in the raphe pallidus of males. This increase following physical but not visual contact agrees with the notion that activation of the serotoninergic system is implicated in the development of sexual satiation but not activated by simply viewing a female, in contrast to the dopaminergic system. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between rapid changes in local aromatase activity and estradiol concentrations in male and female quail brain.
Dickens, M. J.; de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in Hormones and behavior (2014), 65(2), 154-164

Estradiol-17beta (E2) synthesized in the brain plays a critical role in the activation of sexual behavior in many vertebrate species. Because E2 concentrations depend on aromatization of testosterone ... [more ▼]

Estradiol-17beta (E2) synthesized in the brain plays a critical role in the activation of sexual behavior in many vertebrate species. Because E2 concentrations depend on aromatization of testosterone, changes in aromatase enzymatic activity (AA) are often utilized as a proxy to describe E2 concentrations. Utilizing two types of stimuli (sexual interactions and acute restraint stress) that have been demonstrated to reliably alter AA within minutes in opposite directions (sexual interactions=decrease, stress=increase), we tested in Japanese quail whether rapid changes in AA are paralleled by changes in E2 concentrations in discrete brain areas. In males, E2 in the pooled medial preoptic nucleus/medial portion of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (POM/BST) positively correlated with AA following sexual interactions. However, following acute stress, E2 decreased significantly (approximately 2-fold) in the male POM/BST despite a significant increase in AA. In females, AA positively correlated with E2 in both the POM/BST and mediobasal hypothalamus supporting a role for local, as opposed to ovarian, production regulating brain E2 concentrations. In addition, correlations of individual E2 in POM/BST and measurements of female sexual behavior suggested a role for local E2 synthesis in female receptivity. These data demonstrate that local E2 in the male brain changes in response to stimuli on a time course suggestive of potential non-genomic effects on brain and behavior. Overall, this study highlights the complex mechanisms regulating local E2 concentrations including rapid stimulus-driven changes in production and stress-induced changes in catabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailPolicy decisions on endocrine disruptors should be based on science across disciplines: A response to Dietrich, et al.
Gore, A. C.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Bikle, D. et al

in Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (2014), 35(1), 2-5

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See detailEndocrine disruptors: A relevant issue for neuroendocrinology also!
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Levine, Jon E.

in Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (2014), 35(1), 1

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See detailEstrogens control female sexual motivation and receptivity in quail.
de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Ball, Gregory, F.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

Poster (2013, November 10)

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See detailActivation of estrogen receptor beta (ERb) by estrogens rapidly regulates male sexual motivation
Seredynski, Aurore; Ball, Gregory F.; Kelly, Martin J. et al

Conference (2013, September 13)

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See detailc-fos down-regulation inhibits testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated learning
Niessen, Neville-Andrew ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Ball, Gregory et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailModulation of testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated neuroplasticity.
Charlier, Thierry; Seredynski, Aurore ULg; Niessen, Neville-Andrew ULg et al

in General and Comparative Endocrinology (2013)

Steroids modulate the transcription of a multitude of genes and ultimately influence numerous aspects of reproductive behaviors. Our research investigates how one single steroid, testosterone, is able to ... [more ▼]

Steroids modulate the transcription of a multitude of genes and ultimately influence numerous aspects of reproductive behaviors. Our research investigates how one single steroid, testosterone, is able to trigger this vast number of physiological and behavioral responses. Testosterone potency can be changed locally via aromatization into 17b-estradiol which then activates estrogen receptors of the alpha and beta subtypes. We demonstrated that the independent activation of either receptor activates different aspects of male sexual behavior in Japanese quail. In addition, several studies suggest that the specificity of testosterone action on target genes transcription is related to the recruitment of specific steroid receptor coactivators. We demonstrated that the specific down-regulation of the coactivators SRC-1 or SRC-2 in the medial preoptic nucleus by antisense techniques significantly inhibits steroid-dependent male-typical copulatory behavior and the underlying neuroplasticity. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the interaction between several steroid metabolizing enzymes, steroid receptors and their coactivators plays a key role in the control of steroid-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated neuroplasticity in quail. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroestrogens Rapidly Regulate Sexual Motivation But Not Performance
Seredynski, Aurore ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Christophe, Virginie et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2013), 33(1), 164-174

Estrogens exert pleiotropic effects on reproductive traits, which include differentiation and activation of reproductive behaviors and the control of the secretion of gonadotropins. Estrogens also ... [more ▼]

Estrogens exert pleiotropic effects on reproductive traits, which include differentiation and activation of reproductive behaviors and the control of the secretion of gonadotropins. Estrogens also profoundly affect non-reproductive traits, such as cognition and neuroprotection. These effects are usually attributed to nuclear receptor binding and subsequent regulation of target gene transcription. Estrogens also affect neuronal activity and cell-signaling pathways via faster, membrane-initiated events. How these two types of actions that operate in distinct timescales interact in the control of complex behavioral responses is poorly understood. Here, we show that the central administration of estradiol rapidly increases the expression of sexual motivation, as assessed by several measures of sexual motivation produced in response to the visual presentation of a female but not sexual performance in male Japanese quail. This effect is mimicked by membrane-impermeable analogs of estradiol, indicating that it is initiated at the cell membrane. Conversely, blocking the action of estrogens or their synthesis by a single intracerebroventricular injection of estrogen receptor antagonists or aromatase inhibitors, respectively, decreases sexual motivation within minutes without affecting performance. The same steroid has thus evolved complementary mechanisms to regulate different behavioral components (motivation vs performance) in distinct temporal domains (long- vs short-term) so that diverse reproductive activities can be properly coordinated to improve reproductive fitness. Given the pleiotropic effects exerted by estrogens, other responses controlled by these steroids might also depend on a slow genomic regulation of neuronal plasticity underlying behavioral activation and an acute control of motivation to engage in behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailPolicy decisions on endocrine disruptors should be based on science across disciplines: a response to Dietrich et al.
Gore, A. C.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Bikle, D. et al

in Andrology (2013), 1(6), 802-5

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See detailFemale sexual and social behaviors are controlled by estrogens
de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Ball, Gregory F; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailFemale sexual motivation is controlled by estrogens in quail
de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Ball, Gregory F; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailLocal estradiol synthesis in the brain and its implication in male and female sexual motivation of Japanese quail
de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Schmit, Mélanie; Ball, Gregory F et al

in Trabajos del Instituto Cajal (2013)

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See detailAre neuroestrogens implicated in sexual motivation? Development of experimental protocols.
de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Schmit, Mélanie; Ball, Gregory F et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailRapid control of reproductive behaviour by locally synthesised oestrogens: focus on aromatase.
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Seredynski, Aurore ULg; de Bournonville, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroendocrinology (2013), 25(11), 1070-8

Oestrogens activate nucleus- and membrane-initiated signalling. Nucleus-initiated events control a wide array of physiological and behavioural responses. These effects generally take place within ... [more ▼]

Oestrogens activate nucleus- and membrane-initiated signalling. Nucleus-initiated events control a wide array of physiological and behavioural responses. These effects generally take place within relatively long periods of time (several hours to days). By contrast, membrane-initiated signalling affects a multitude of cellular functions in a much shorter timeframe (seconds to minutes). However, much less is known about their functional significance. Furthermore, the origin of the oestrogens able to trigger these acute effects is rarely examined. Finally, these two distinct types of oestrogenic actions have often been studied independently such that we do not exactly know how they cooperate to control the same response. The present review presents a synthesis of recent work carried out in our laboratory that aimed to address these issues in the context of the study of male sexual behaviour in Japanese quail, which is a considered as a suitable species for tackling these issues. The first section presents data indicating that 17b-oestradiol, or its membrane impermeable analogues, acutely enhances measures of male sexual motivation but does not affect copulatory behaviour. These effects depend on the activation of membrane-initiated events and local oestrogen production. The second part of this review discusses the regulation of brain oestrogen synthesis through post-translational modifications of the enzyme aromatase. Initially discovered in vitro, these rapid and reversible enzymatic modulations occur in vivo following variations in the social and environment context and therefore provide a mechanism of acute regulation of local oestrogen provision with a spatial and time resolution compatible with the rapid effects observed on male sexual behaviour. Finally, we discuss how these distinct modes of oestrogenic action (membrane- versus nucleus-initiated) acting in different time frames (short- versus long-term) interact to control different components (motivation versus performance) of the same behavioural response and improve reproductive fitness. [less ▲]

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See detailSex steroid modulation of sensory processing.
Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Frontiers in neuroendocrinology (2013), 34(4), 253-4

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