References of "Bahri, Mohamed Ali"
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See detailPerformance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom.
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Plenevaux, Alain ULg et al

in Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research Section A (2011), 648

The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high power tube and a flat panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of ... [more ▼]

The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high power tube and a flat panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with the one of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom was already described [1]. The phantom was imaged using typical rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm-1 corresponding to 114 μm resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained with the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm-1 ) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R2 > 0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured: a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments to include beam hardening and scatter corrections will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of a beta microprobe system to measure arterial input function in PET via an arteriovenous shunt in rats
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Goblet, David ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Research (2011), 1

Kinetic modeling of physiological function using imaging techniques requires the accurate measurement of the time-activity curve of the tracer in plasma, known as the arterial input function (IF). The ... [more ▼]

Kinetic modeling of physiological function using imaging techniques requires the accurate measurement of the time-activity curve of the tracer in plasma, known as the arterial input function (IF). The measurement of IF can be achieved through manual blood sampling, the use of small counting systems such as beta microprobes, or by derivation from PET images. Previous studies using beta microprobe systems to continuously measure IF have suffered from high background counts. In the present study, a light-insensitive beta microprobe with a temporal resolution of up to 1 s was used in combination with a pump-driven femoral arteriovenous shunt to measure IF in rats. The shunt apparatus was designed such that the placement of the beta microprobe was highly reproducible. The probe-derived IF was compared to that obtained from manual sampling at 5-s intervals and IF derived from a left ventricle VOI in a dynamic PET image of the heart. Probe-derived IFs were very well matched to that obtained by "gold standard" manual blood sampling, but with an increased temporal resolution of up to 1 s. The area under the curve (AUC) ratio between probe- and manually derived IFs was 1.07 ± 0.05 with a coefficient of variation of 0.04. However, image-derived IFs were significantly underestimated compared to the manually sampled IFs, with an AUC ratio of 0.76 ± 0.24 with a coefficient of variation of 0.32. IF derived from the beta microprobe accurately represented the IF as measured by blood sampling, was reproducible, and was more accurate than an image-derived technique. The use of the shunt removed problems of tissue-background activity, and the use of a light-tight probe with minimal gamma sensitivity refined the system. The probe/shunt apparatus can be used in both microprobe and PET studies. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain energization in response to deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nuclei in Parkinson's disease.
Garraux, Gaëtan ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Lemaire, Christian ULg et al

in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism (2011)

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment in a subgroup of medically refractory patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we compared resting-state (18)F ... [more ▼]

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment in a subgroup of medically refractory patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we compared resting-state (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography images in the stimulator off (DBS_OFF) and on (DBS_ON) conditions in eight PD patients in an unmedicated state, on average 2 years after bilateral electrode implantation. Global standardized uptake value (SUV) significantly increased by approximately 11% in response to STN-DBS. To avoid any bias in the voxel-based analysis comparing DBS_ON and DBS_OFF conditions, individual scan intensity was scaled to a region where FDG-SUV did not differ significantly between conditions. The resulting FDG-SUV ratio (FDG-SUVR) was found to increase in many regions in response to STN-DBS including the target area of surgery, caudate nuclei, primary sensorimotor, and associative cortices. Contrary to previous studies, we could not find any regional decrease in FDG-SUVR. These findings were indirectly supported by comparing the extent of areas with depressed FDG-SUVR in DBS_OFF and DBS_ON relatively to 10 normal controls. Altogether, these novel results support the prediction that the effect of STN-DBS on brain activity in PD is unidirectional and consists in an increase in many subcortical and cortical regions.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 6 April 2011; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2011.41. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]fallypride binding in the mouse brain: test-retest and effects of registration
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Geuzaine, Annabelle ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg et al

Conference (2011, January 17)

The quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with PET tracer experiments is an intricate and challenging problem especially for small animals such as rats and mice. A test-retest scan is usually set up ... [more ▼]

The quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with PET tracer experiments is an intricate and challenging problem especially for small animals such as rats and mice. A test-retest scan is usually set up in order to confirm an observed experimental effect or to examine the reliability of the experiment design. Inadequate processing of the image data may also mask small effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of image registration on [18F]fallypride binding potentials calculated from PET mouse test-retest data. Sub-optimal registration affected the quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with [18F]fallypride. The absence of anatomical information in the [18F]fallypride image and the lack of a homogeneous tracer distribution, even during the earlier minutes of the scan, lead to erroneous automatic registration. A FDG scan after each [18F]fallypride test could improve registration as FDG provides a more homogeneous brain image. Variability in the data could also result from stress induced by anaesthesia or the experimental environment. [less ▲]

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See detailImage Quality evaluation for 124I in the microPET Focus 120 scanner using the NEMA NU4-2008 phantom
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Taleb, Dounia ULg et al

Conference (2011, January 17)

Physical properties of iodine-124 such as its high positron energy, corresponding large positron range in tissue and the fraction of the single γ-photons emitted may have detrimental effects on the PET ... [more ▼]

Physical properties of iodine-124 such as its high positron energy, corresponding large positron range in tissue and the fraction of the single γ-photons emitted may have detrimental effects on the PET image quality. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the image quality for iodine-124 in the small animal microPET Focus 120 scanner using the NEMA NU4-2008 image quality phantom. Although the 2 ns timing window gives higher recovery coefficients and slightly lower spill-over ratios and combined with the 350-590 keV energy window gives the lowest spill-over ratio, the combination of the 350-650 keV and 6 ns windows seems to be the best compromise to obtain images with high contrast and low noise content. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerebral metabolic correlates of episodic autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Memory (2011)

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See detailThe neural correlates of cognitive reserve in aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailIdentifying the default-mode component in spatial IC analyses of patients with disorders of consciousness.
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2011)

Objectives:Recent fMRI studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify the default-mode network (DMN) in the absence of any task, by resting-state connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Recent fMRI studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify the default-mode network (DMN) in the absence of any task, by resting-state connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers. We here aimed to identify the DMN in the challenging patient population of disorders of consciousness encountered following coma. Experimental design: A spatial independent component analysis-based methodology permitted DMN assessment, decomposing connectivity in all its different sources either neuronal or artifactual. Three different selection criteria were introduced assessing anticorrelation-corrected connectivity with or without an automatic masking procedure and calculating connectivity scores encompassing both spatial and temporal properties. These three methods were validated on 10 healthy controls and applied to an independent group of 8 healthy controls and 11 severely brain-damaged patients [locked-in syndrome (n = 2), minimally conscious (n = 1), and vegetative state (n = 8)]. Principal observations: All vegetative patients showed fewer connections in the default-mode areas, when compared with controls, contrary to locked-in patients who showed near-normal connectivity. In the minimally conscious-state patient, only the two selection criteria considering both spatial and temporal properties were able to identify an intact right lateralized BOLD connectivity pattern, and metabolic PET data suggested its neuronal origin. Conclusions: When assessing resting-state connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness, it is important to use a methodology excluding non-neuronal contributions caused by head motion, respiration, and heart rate artifacts encountered in all studied patients. Hum Brain Mapp, 2011. (c) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailIN VIVO PET IMAGING OF THE EFFECT OF THE NMDA ANTAGONIST MEMANTINE ON GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN THE RODENT BRAIN
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2010, September)

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See detailTHE EFFECT OF BETA MICROPROBE IMPLANTATION ON THE BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Dedeurwaardere, Stefanie; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2010, September)

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See detailDISPLACEMENT OF 18F-FALLYPRIDE BINDING WITH HALOPERIDOL IN A WITHIN-SUBJECT DESIGN USING A BETA MICROPROBE
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Goblet, David ULg; Lemaire, Christian ULg et al

in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism (2009, October), 29(S1), 352-353

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (14 ULg)