References of "Bahri, Mohamed Ali"
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See detailCerebral functional connectivity periodically (de)synchronizes with anatomical constraints
Liegeois, Raphaël ULg; Ziegler, Erik; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Brain Structure and Function (2015)

This paper studies the link between resting-state functional connectivity (FC), measured by the correlations of the fMRI BOLD time courses, and structural connectivity (SC), estimated through fiber ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the link between resting-state functional connectivity (FC), measured by the correlations of the fMRI BOLD time courses, and structural connectivity (SC), estimated through fiber tractography. Instead of a static analysis based on the correlation between SC and the FC averaged over the entire fMRI time series, we propose a dynamic analysis, based on the time evolution of the correlation between SC and a suitably windowed FC. Assessing the statistical significance of the time series against random phase permutations, our data show a pronounced peak of significance for time window widths around 20-30 TR (40-60 sec). Using the appropriate window width, we show that FC patterns oscillate between phases of high modularity, primarily shaped by anatomy, and phases of low modularity, primarily shaped by inter-network connectivity. Building upon recent results in dynamic FC, this emphasizes the potential role of SC as a transitory architecture between different highly connected resting state FC patterns. Finally, we show that networks implied in consciousness-related processes, such as the default mode network (DMN), contribute more to these brain-level fluctuations compared to other networks, such as the motor or somatosensory networks. This suggests that the fluctuations between FC and SC are capturing mind-wandering effects. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H as a new PET radiotracer for Synaptic vesicle protein 2A: A first clinical trial.
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Stifkens, M; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Nucleaire Geneeskunde (2015, May 09), 37(3), 1457-1458

The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is ... [more ▼]

The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam. This drug has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. Dynamic PET data of the head of 4 healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function (IF) was obtained by blood sampling but also derived from the dynamic data using the correlation coefficient method. Blood data revealed a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The unchanged fraction of [18F]UCB-H in plasma showed a bi-exponential behavioral decrease with a starting fraction of 92% of the injected amount of the tracer, measured at 3 min post injection. This fraction decreased to about 50% at 10 min post injection. The image-derived arterial IFs showed to be very similar to the measured ones with a peak-ratio around 0.91 and an area-under-curve ratio about 0.98. The PET images showed a high and rapid uptake of [18F]UCB-H in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout. For the three standard compartmental models (1-tissue, 2-tissue, and Logan Plot), similar results were obtained with both the measured and image-derived IFs. Nevertheless the two-tissue compartment model fitted the experimental data best and provided a total distribution volume of the [18F]UCB-H in the brain greater than 7 mL/cm3 and a specific distribution volume around 3 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies (dosimetry has already been reported elsewhere). Image-derived IF showed to be useful for quantitative studies without the need to the arterial blood sampling. This new tracer could help to assess SV2A modifications in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]FMT: a reliable PET tracer for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease rat model.
Seret, Alain ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 09)

Background: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-[18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-[18F]FMT) is ... [more ▼]

Background: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-[18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-[18F]FMT) is an effective PET tracer to evaluate of DA terminals integrity and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) metabolic pathway. However, there are currently no available quantitative PET studies using [18F]FMT in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of in vivo PET study using [18F]FMT on 6-OHDA PD’s model. Methods: 10 µg of 6-OHDA were injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8). As control, sham-treated rats (n=8) were injected with vehicle only but otherwise treated identically. Striatal DA presynaptic activity was assessed by dynamic [18F]FMT PET, 30 min after benserazide pretreatment. Structural T2-weighted brain images were acquired on a 9.4T MRI and were used for co-registration. After normalization on a MRI template, kinetic analysis was performed by “Patlak Reference” model, using PMOD software. Results: Striatal accumulation of [18F]FMT was observed in rats pretreated with benserazide, a peripheral AAAD inhibitor. As consequence of the 6-OHDA-lesion, significant decrease of [18F]FMT accumulation was recorded in the striatum ipsilateral to the lesion. Lesioned rats had dramatically reduced uptake constant Ki in the ipsilateral striatum compared to the contralateral striatum (p<0.001) and to the ipsilateral striatum of sham-treated rats (p<0.005). The Ki ratio (Ipsi./Contra.) was equivalent to 94% in the sham group and dropped to 41% in the lesioned group. Conclusions: [18F]FMT PET enables us to quantify loss of DA presynaptic function in unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results encourage us to pursue further investigations in a longitudinal way and to monitor the progression of the dopaminergic dysfunction in more moderate and gradual preclinical PD models. [less ▲]

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See detailPartial volume effect impact on PET preclinical dosimetry: a simulation study
Seret, Alain ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bretin, Florian et al

Conference (2015, May 09)

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See detailStrategies of regioselective radiolabeling of Nanofitin binder for imaging
Goux, Marine ULg; Dammicco, Sylvestre ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg et al

Poster (2015, May)

Recently, new strategies emerged in the field of monoclonal antibodies radiolabeling for PET imaging with the use of positron emitter such as fluorine-18, zirconium-89 or gallium-68. Despite their ... [more ▼]

Recently, new strategies emerged in the field of monoclonal antibodies radiolabeling for PET imaging with the use of positron emitter such as fluorine-18, zirconium-89 or gallium-68. Despite their important role in the therapeutic world, antibodies have many disadvantages related to their structure. Moreover, conjugation of chelating agent often occurs on lysines, which is non-regioselective and leads to a heterogeneous mixture of products. In addition, the slow clearance of antibodies can be a problem to obtain a good contrast when they are used in imaging. To address these different limitations, we developed a chemistry-free chelating system consisting of a highly phosphorylatable peptide tag fused genetically to a Nanofitin. A specific phosphorylation step, with the alpha subunit of the casein kinase II, generates a nanocluster of 4 phosphates that can interact strongly with metal ion like zirconium or gallium. This strategy has already demonstrated its powerfulness for the stable and specific anchoring of protein on zirconium phosphonate-based microarray [1]. Considering this tag has been created to specifically anchoring protein on zirconium phosphonate-based microarray, we are currently working on a sequence derived from calcium-binding proteins to chelate specifically lanthanides[2]. As described by Pardoux et al.[3], our strategy is to functionalize this sequence with a phosphate nanocluster able to chelate zirconium or gallium. Our first results shown that a mono-phosphorylatable tag phosphorylated in vitro is able to chelate terbium(III) with a lower affinity than the wild type. Considering that terbium(III) is bigger than gallium(III) or zirconium(IV), we can suppose that the cage obtained is too small but suitable for other ions. In order to validate our hypothesis, we have planned to radiolabel those tags and determine their affinity for gallium(III). In order to validate the use of Nanofitin as a potent alternative tool for in vivo imaging, we have made biokinetic studies in mice with PET and MRI imaging. In these studies, we have radiolabelled with fluorine-18 a Nanofitin and we are currently making use of its specific binding to a cell-surface receptor to target a very precise cell population by using an animal model. Once the phosphorylatable tag optimized for regioselective radiolabelling and the Nanofitin targeting validated in an animal model, the next steps will be to combine these two approaches: we will fuse genetically the tag to the specific Nanofitin, radiolabel it with gallium-68 and perform the biokinetic study of this new radiopharmaceutical product. [1] M. Cinier, M. Petit, F. Pecorari, D. R. Talham, B. Bujoli, and C. Tellier, “Engineering of a phosphorylatable tag for specific protein binding on zirconium phosphonate based microarrays.,” J. Biol. Inorg. Chem., vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 399–407, Mar. 2012. [2] L. J. Martin, “Development of Lanthanide-Binding Tags (LBTs) as powerful and versatile peptides for use in studies of proteins and protein interactions,” 2008. [3] R. Pardoux, S. Sauge-merle, D. Lemaire, P. Delangle, L. Guilloreau, J. Adriano, and C. Berthomieu, “Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides : Effect of Phosphorylation,” PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 8, 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional MRI for predicting metastatic spreading at the time of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy
LALLEMAND, François ULg; Leroi, Natacha ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, April)

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery is driven by the occurrence of side effects or the ... [more ▼]

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery is driven by the occurrence of side effects or the tumor downsizing. Some studies demonstrated that the timing of surgery and the RT schedule could influence tumor dissemination and subsequently patient overall survival. Our aim is to evaluate with functional MRI the impact of the radiation treatment on the tumor microenvironment and subsequently to determine the best timing to perform surgery for avoiding tumor spreading. [less ▲]

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See detail18F-FMT: a reliable PET tracer for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease rat model.
Becker, Guillaume ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Michel, Anne et al

Poster (2015, March 18)

Objectives: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-18F-fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-18F-FMT) is ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-18F-fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-18F-FMT) is an effective PET tracer to evaluate of DA terminals integrity and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) metabolic pathway. However, there are currently no available quantitative PET studies using 18F-FMT in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of in vivo PET study using 18F-FMT on 6-OHDA PD’s model. Methods: 10 µg of 6-OHDA were injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8). As control, sham-treated rats (n=8) were injected with vehicle only but otherwise treated identically. Striatal DA presynaptic activity was assessed by dynamic 18F-FMT-PET. Structural T2-weighted brain images were acquired on a 9.4T MRI and were used for co-registration. After normalization on a MRI template, kinetic analysis was performed by “Patlak Reference” model, using PMOD software. Results: Striatal accumulation of 18F-FMT was observed in rats pretreated with benserazide, a peripheral AAAD inhibitor. As consequence of the 6-OHDA-lesion, significant decrease of 18F-FMT accumulation was recorded in the striatum ipsilateral to the lesion. Lesioned rats had dramatically reduced uptake constant Ki in the ipsilateral striatum compared to the contralateral striatum (p<0.001) and to the ipsilateral striatum of sham-treated rats (p<0.005). The Ki ratio (Ipsi./Contra.) was equivalent to 94% in the sham group and dropped to 41% in the lesioned group. Conclusions: 18F-FMT PET enables us to quantify loss of DA presynaptic function in unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results encourage us to pursue further investigations in a longitudinal way and to monitor the progression of the dopaminergic dysfunction in more moderate and gradual preclinical PD models. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of predictive markers based on functional imaging of metastatic spreading at the time of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy
LALLEMAND, François ULg; Leroi, Natacha ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery are driven by the occurrence of side effects or the ... [more ▼]

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery are driven by the occurrence of side effects or the tumor downsizing. Some studies demonstrated that the timing of surgery and the RT schedule could influence tumor dissemination. Our aim is to evaluate with functional MRI the impact of the radiation treatment on the tumor microenvironment and subsequently to determine the best timing to perform surgery. We used a model of NeoRT, 4T1 cells were implanted in the flank of BalbC mice. Seven days after, tumors were irradiated with 2x5Gy than we surgically removed this lesion 11 days after RT. Diffusion Weighted (DW) and Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) -MRI was performed every 2 days during 11 days between RT and surgery. We developed a homemade “portacath” specifically dedicated for mice and for repetitive I.V. contrast agent injection. For DW-MRI, we performed sequences with 10 different B-value to achieve IntraVoxel Incoherent Motion analysis. For DCE-MRI, we used FSEMS sequence for keeping the same slices as with DW-MRI. For both images, we performed analysis on the entire tumor volume. We obtained very promising preliminary results showing good uniformity in the ADC (Attenuation Diffusion Coefficient). We succeeded to follow mice with imaging during the 11 days without major troubles. We observed less variability of the ADC signal during the 11 days in the irradiated tumors compared to the control. The signal to noise ratio was relatively poor for the diffusion sequence and need to be improved. For the first time, we demonstrate the feasibility of repetitive MRI functional imaging in a mice model of NeoRT. These results open perspectives for studying modifications of the tumor microenvironment induced by neoadjuvant RT. The techniques need to be improved and correlated to the tumor dissemination in function of the RT schedule and timing of surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of α-synuclein levels on cerebral synaptic function: Validation of a novel PET radioligand for the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease
Tarragon Cros, Ernesto ULg; Ferrara, André ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

Background In Parkinson’s disease, converging evidence supports a pathogenic role for excessive α–synuclein accumulation in synaptic terminals that may propagate back to the soma of vulnerable nerve cells ... [more ▼]

Background In Parkinson’s disease, converging evidence supports a pathogenic role for excessive α–synuclein accumulation in synaptic terminals that may propagate back to the soma of vulnerable nerve cells such as neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The resulting loss of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum can be demonstrated in vivo using 18F-Dopa-PET (positron emission tomography). However, there’s currently no validated biomarker of the progressive synaptic dysfunction in other vulnerable areas such as the cerebral cortex. Goal In this longitudinal study, we will test the hypothesis that the loss of synaptic terminals in a mouse model of excessive α–synuclein accumulation can be demonstrated in vivo before the occurrence of behavioural disturbances using 18F-UCB-H, a new PET biomarker developed at CRC. We will also test if this new imaging modality is sensitive enough to study the effect of a disease modifying therapy such as chronic physical exercise. Methods We will use microPET for the in vivo quantification of 18F-UCB-H brain uptake in 16 wild type animals and 16 transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing human α–syn under the mThy1 promotor every 2 months. Data will be validated against post-mortem analyses after the last PET study. Predictions We predict decreased tracer uptake over time in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex in Tg mice as compared with WT animals. Also, we predict a relationship between 18F-UCB-H uptake levels in basal ganglia and cerebral cortex and progressive alterations in both motor and cognitive functions, respectively. Further, we also expect that chronic exercise will slow down both motor and cognitive disturbances, as well as the rate of 18F-UCB-H brain uptake decreases. Conclusion If 18F-UCB-H PET proves to be a valid biomarker for the early detection of α–synuclein accumulation in the pre-clinical model of PD, the methods will tested on human clinical populations. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H as a new PET radiotracer for Synaptic vesicle protein 2A: A first clinical trial
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Stifkens, Mathieu; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

SV2A is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is ... [more ▼]

SV2A is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of levetiracetam. Levetiracetam is an antiepileptic drug which has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. Dynamic PET data of the head of 4 healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function (IF) was obtained by blood sampling. The IF was also derived from the dynamic data using the correlation coefficient method. Blood data revealed a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The image-derived arterial IFs were showed to be very similar to the measured ones with a peak-ratio around 0.91 and an area-under-curve ratio about 0.98. The [18F]UCB-H PET data showed a high and rapid uptake in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout allowing the standard compartmental modeling (1-tissue, 2-tissue, and Logan Plot). The three models gave similar results with both the measured and image-derived IFs. The total distribution volume of the tracer in the brain was greater than 7 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies. Image-derived IF showed to be useful for quantitative studies without the need to the arterial blood sampling. SV2A modifications may consequently be assessed in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detailBiodistribution and radiation dosimetry for the novel SV2A radiotracer [18F]UCB-H: First-in-human study.
Bretin, Florian ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; BERNARD, Claire ULg et al

in Molecular Imaging & Biology (2015), 17

Abstract- [18F]UCB-H is a novel radiotracer with a high affinity for SV2A, a protein expressed in synaptic vesicles. SV2A is the binding site of levetiracetam, a “first in class” antiepileptic drug with a ... [more ▼]

Abstract- [18F]UCB-H is a novel radiotracer with a high affinity for SV2A, a protein expressed in synaptic vesicles. SV2A is the binding site of levetiracetam, a “first in class” antiepileptic drug with a distinct but still poorly understood mechanism of action. The objective of this study was to determine the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [18F]UCB-H in a human clinical trial and to establish injection limits according to biomedical research guidelines. Additionally, the clinical radiation dosimetry results were compared to estimations in previously published preclinical data. Dynamic whole body PET/CT imaging was performed over approximately 110 minutes on five healthy male volunteers after injection of 144.5 ± 7.1 MBq (range, 139.1 – 156.5 MBq) of [18F]UCB-H. Major organs were delineated on CT images and time-activity curves were obtained from co-registered dynamic PET emission scans. Time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated as area under the curve using trapezoidal numerical integration. Urinary excretion data based on PET-activities including voiding was simulated using the dynamic bladder module of OLINDA/EXM. The radiation dosimetry was calculated using OLINDA/EXM. The effective dose to the OLINDA/EXM 70 kg standard male was 1.54E-02 ± 6.84E-04 mSv/MBq, with urinary bladder wall, gallbladder wall and the liver receiving the highest absorbed dose. The brain, the tracer’s main organ of interest, received an absorbed dose of 1.89E-02 ± 2.32E-03 mGy/MBq. This first human dosimetry study of [18F]UCB-H indicated that the tracer shows similar radiation burdens to widely used common clinical tracers. Single injections of at maximum 672 MBq for USA practice and 649 MBq for European practice keep radiation exposure below recommended limits. Recently published preclinical dosimetry data extrapolated from mice provided satisfactory prediction of total body and effective dose, but showed significant differences in organ absorbed doses compared to human data. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical Response to tDCS Depends on Residual Brain Metabolism and Grey Matter Integrity in Patients With Minimally Conscious State.
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Di Perri, Carol; Chatelle, Camille ULg et al

in Brain stimulation (2015), 8(6), 1116-23

BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was recently shown to promote recovery of voluntary signs of consciousness in some patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). However, it ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was recently shown to promote recovery of voluntary signs of consciousness in some patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). However, it remains unclear why clinical improvement is only observed in a subgroup of patients. OBJECTIVES: In this retrospective study, we investigated the relationship between tDCS responsiveness and neuroimaging data from MCS patients. METHODS: Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and clinical electroencephalography (EEG) were acquired in 21 sub-acute and chronic MCS patients (8 tDCS responders) who subsequently (<48 h) received left dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPF) tDCS in a double-blind randomized cross-over trial. The behavioral data have been published elsewhere (Thibaut et al., Neurology, 2014). RESULTS: Grey matter atrophy was observed in non-responders as compared with responders in the left DLPF cortex, the medial-prefrontal cortex, the cingulate cortex, the hippocampi, part of the rolandic regions, and the left thalamus. FDG-PET showed hypometabolism in non-responders as compared with responders in the left DLPF cortex, the medial-prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the thalamus. EEG did not show any difference between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the transient increase of signs of consciousness following left DLPF tDCS in patients in MCS require grey matter preservation and residual metabolic activity in cortical and subcortical brain areas known to be involved in attention and working memory. These results further underline the critical role of long-range cortico-thalamic connections in consciousness recovery, providing important information for guidelines on the use of tDCS in disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras delusion during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Rémi, Capa et al

in American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias (2015), 30(7), 699-706

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since ... [more ▼]

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24 healthy elderly subjects and 26 AD patients without delusional syndrome. Compared to the healthy and AD groups, the patient had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In light of current neural models of face perception, our patient’s Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal connectivity: a marker of dynamical functional connectivity applied to consciousness
Liegeois, Raphaël ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015)

In the last years functional connectivity (FC) has become one of the most popular tools to explore and characterize information contained in fMRI =me series. The classical hypothesis on FC consists of ... [more ▼]

In the last years functional connectivity (FC) has become one of the most popular tools to explore and characterize information contained in fMRI =me series. The classical hypothesis on FC consists of considering it as constant (or static) over the whole fMRI time series. However, it has been emphasized recently that FC should be treated as a dynamical quantity, for example by using sliding windows of the fMRI time courses in order to compute a dynamical FC. We propose a comprehensive marker of FC based on an auto-regressive (AR) model of fMRI time series capturing its static and dynamic properties. We call it total connectivity and we illustrate the benefits of our approach on data of patients undergoing four different states of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailRecognition of Personally Familiar Faces and Functional Connectivity in Alzheimer’s Disease
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2015), 67

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See detailChanges in cerebral metabolism in patients with a minimally conscious state responding to zolpidem.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Frontiers in Neuroscience (2014)

BACKGROUND: Zolpidem, a short-acting non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist hypnotic, has been shown to induce paradoxical responses in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), leading to recovery of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Zolpidem, a short-acting non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist hypnotic, has been shown to induce paradoxical responses in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC), leading to recovery of arousal and cognitive abilities. We here assessed zolpidem-induced changes in regional brain metabolism in three patients with known zolpidem response in chronic post-anoxic minimally conscious state (MCS). METHODS: [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and standardized clinical assessments using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised were performed after administration of 10 mg zolpidem or placebo in a randomized double blind 2-day protocol. PET data preprocessing and comparison with a healthy age-matched control group were performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM8). RESULTS: Behaviorally, all patients recovered functional communication after administration of zolpidem (i.e., emergence from the MCS). FDG-PET showed increased metabolism in dorsolateral prefrontal and mesiofrontal cortices after zolpidem but not after placebo administration. CONCLUSION: Our data show a metabolic activation of prefrontal areas, corroborating the proposed mesocircuit hypothesis to explain the paradoxical effect of zolpidem observed in some patients with DOC. It also suggests the key role of the prefrontal cortices in the recovery of functional communication and object use in hypoxic patients with chronic MCS. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of [18F]UCB-H as a novel PET tracer for synaptic vesicle protein 2A in the brain.
Warnock, Geoffrey; Aerts, Joël ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2014), 55(8), 1336-1341

Synaptic vesicle 2 (SV2) proteins are critical to proper nervous system function and are involved in vesicle trafficking. The SV2A isoform has been identified as the binding site of the antiepileptic ... [more ▼]

Synaptic vesicle 2 (SV2) proteins are critical to proper nervous system function and are involved in vesicle trafficking. The SV2A isoform has been identified as the binding site of the antiepileptic levetiracetam (LEV), making it an interesting therapeutic target for epilepsy. [18F]UCB-H is a novel PET imaging agent with a nanomolar affinity for human SV2A. Methods: preclinical PET studies were carried out in isoflurane anesthetized rats. Arterial input function was measured using an arteriovenous shunt and beta microprobe system. [18F]UCB-H was injected IV (140 ± 20 MBq bolus). Results: brain uptake of [18F]UCB-H was high, matching the expected homogeneous distribution of SV2A. The distribution volume (Vt) for [18F]UCB-H was calculated using Logan’s graphical analysis and the effect of LEV pretreatment on Vt measured. In control animals the mean whole-brain Vt was 9.76 ± 0.52 ml/cm3 (mean ± SD, n=4, test-retest), and the mean reproducibility in test-retest studies was 10.4 ± 6.5 %. Uptake of [18F]UCB-H was dose-dependently blocked by pretreatment with LEV (0.1 - 100 mg/kg IV). Conclusion: our results indicate that [18F]UCB-H is a suitable radiotracer for the imaging of SV2A in vivo. This is the first PET tracer for in vivo quantification of SV2A. The necessary steps for implementation of [18F]UCB-H production under GMP conditions and first in human studies are planned. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detail[18F]UCB-H AS A NEW PET RADIOTRACER FOR SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTEIN 2A
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Aerts, Joël ULg et al

Poster (2014, June 06)

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown ... [more ▼]

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, for example, by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of levetiracetam. Levetiracetam is an antiepileptic drug which has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease and to improve cognition in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, a fluorine-18 radiolabelled PET imaging tracer, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. [18F]UCB-H was radiosynthesized under GMP conditions. Dynamic PET data of the head of four healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function was obtained by blood sampling during the dynamic PET acquisition. The analysis of the blood data reveled a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma which indicates a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The unchanged fraction of [18F]UCB-H in plasma showed a bi-exponential behavioral decrease with a starting fraction of 92% of the injected amount of the tracer, measured at 3 min post injection. This fraction decreased to about 50% at 10 min post injection. The [18F]UCB-H PET data showed a high and rapid uptake in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout allowing the standard compartmental modeling (1-tissue compartment, 2-tissue compartment, and Logan graphical analysis). The three models gave consistent results. The two-tissue compartment model fitted the experimental data best and provided a total distribution volume of the [18F]UCB-H in the brain greater than 7 mL/cm3 and a specific distribution volume around 3 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies. In the future, SV2A modifications might be assessed in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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