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See detailBreakdown of within- and between-network resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.
Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in Anesthesiology (2010), 113(5), 1038-53

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms of anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows investigating whole-brain connectivity changes ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms of anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows investigating whole-brain connectivity changes during pharmacological modulation of the level of consciousness. METHODS: Low-frequency spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations were measured in 19 healthy volunteers during wakefulness, mild sedation, deep sedation with clinical unconsciousness, and subsequent recovery of consciousness. RESULTS: Propofol-induced decrease in consciousness linearly correlates with decreased corticocortical and thalamocortical connectivity in frontoparietal networks (i.e., default- and executive-control networks). Furthermore, during propofol-induced unconsciousness, a negative correlation was identified between thalamic and cortical activity in these networks. Finally, negative correlations between default network and lateral frontoparietal cortices activity, present during wakefulness, decreased proportionally to propofol-induced loss of consciousness. In contrast, connectivity was globally preserved in low-level sensory cortices, (i.e., in auditory and visual networks across sedation stages). This was paired with preserved thalamocortical connectivity in these networks. Rather, waning of consciousness was associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between visual and auditory networks. CONCLUSIONS: Our results shed light on the functional significance of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations observed in functional magnetic resonance imaging. They suggest that propofol-induced unconsciousness could be linked to a breakdown of cerebral temporal architecture that modifies both within- and between-network connectivity and thus prevents communication between low-level sensory and higher-order frontoparietal cortices, thought to be necessary for perception of external stimuli. They emphasize the importance of thalamocortical connectivity in higher-order cognitive brain networks in the genesis of conscious perception. [less ▲]

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See detailSide effects of the addition of clonidine 75 microg or sufentanil 5 microg to 0.2% ropivacaine for labour epidural analgesia.
Dewandre, Pierre-Yves ULg; Decurninge, Valérie; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg et al

in International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia (2010), 19(2), 149-54

BACKGROUND: Sufentanil 5 microg and clonidine 75 microg produce a similar reduction in minimum local anaesthetic concentration of ropivacaine. The aim of the present study was to compare the side effects ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Sufentanil 5 microg and clonidine 75 microg produce a similar reduction in minimum local anaesthetic concentration of ropivacaine. The aim of the present study was to compare the side effects of two equianalgesic solutions by combining 0.2% ropivacaine with either sufentanil 5 microg or clonidine 75 microg for labour epidural analgesia. METHODS: In a prospective double-blind study, 60 women at 5 cm cervical dilatation were randomly allocated to receive 0.2% ropivacaine with either sufentanil 5 microg or clonidine 75 microg to initiate labour analgesia. The analgesic efficacy and side effects of the two mixtures were compared. RESULTS: Onset, duration and quality of analgesia and subsequent ropivacaine consumption were similar in the two groups. Hypotension was significantly more frequent and severe with clonidine than with sufentanil (systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg: 17/26 vs. 6/24, P <0.05; systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg: 5/26 vs. 0/24, P <0.05) resulting in more frequent ephedrine administration (11/26 vs. 2/24, P <0.05) and larger fluid requirements (1696 +/- 583 mL vs. 1264 +/- 407 mL, P < 0.05). Conversely, pruritus was more frequent with sufentanil than with clonidine (6/26 vs. 1/24, P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Hypotension occurs more frequently when clonidine is added to epidural ropivacaine instead of an equianalgesic dose of sufentanil. Therefore, clonidine cannot be recommended for routine administration for labour epidural analgesia. [less ▲]

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See detailIntracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia: case report and review of the literature
Machurot, P. Y.; Vergnion, M.; Fraipont, V. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2010), 61(2), 63-66

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See detailEffect of an intravenous infusion of lidocaine on cisatracurium-induced neuromuscular block duration: a randomized-controlled trial.
Hans, Grégory ULg; Defresne, Aline ULg; Ki, Bertille et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (2010), 54(10), 1192-6

BACKGROUND: Intravenous lidocaine can be used intraoperatively for its analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties but local anaesthetics may also prolong the duration of action of neuromuscular blocking ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Intravenous lidocaine can be used intraoperatively for its analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties but local anaesthetics may also prolong the duration of action of neuromuscular blocking agents. We hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine would prolong the time to recovery of neuromuscular function after cisatracurium. METHODS: Forty-two patients were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Before induction, patients were administered either a 1.5 mg/kg bolus of intravenous lidocaine followed by a 2 mg/kg/h infusion or an equal volume of saline. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained using propofol and remifentanil infusions. After loss of consciousness, a 0.15 mg/kg bolus of cisatracurium was administered. No additional cisatracurium injection was allowed. Neuromuscular function was assessed every 20 s using kinemyography. The primary endpoint was the time to spontaneous recovery of a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >/= 0.9. RESULTS: The time to spontaneous recovery of a TOF ratio >/= 0.9 was 94 +/- 15 min in the control group and 98 +/- 16 min in the lidocaine group (P=0.27). CONCLUSIONS: No significant prolongation of spontaneous recovery of a TOF ratio >/= 0.9 after cisatracurium was found in patients receiving intravenous lidocaine. [less ▲]

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See detailMécanismes de l'anesthésie générale: apport de l'imagerie fonctionnelle
Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Kirsch, Murielle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(Synthèse 2009), 36-41

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See detailManagement of the unstable cervical spine: elective versus emergent cases.
Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Hans, Pol ULg

in Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology (2009), 22(5), 579-85

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review focuses on similarities and discrepancies in the management of emergent and elective unstable cervical spine (C-spine) patients. RECENT FINDINGS: During mobilization ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review focuses on similarities and discrepancies in the management of emergent and elective unstable cervical spine (C-spine) patients. RECENT FINDINGS: During mobilization, lifting is superior to rolling in limiting spine movements. Before prone position surgery, the transfer of the patient on a rotating table is preferable to rolling. In trauma patients, helical computed tomography (CT) with sagittal reconstruction is the first choice for clearing the C-spine. In those patients, airway compromise may be related to hidden cervical edema or hematoma. Several devices can be of help in performing safe tracheal intubation in patients with limited neck movements, but awake fiberoptic intubation remains the safest procedure. The muscle relaxant antagonist sugammadex can improve safety for rapid sequence induction. It can rapidly reverse profound steroid-based neuromuscular blockade and allows avoidance of succinylcholine in this indication. Propofol anesthesia better prevents coughing upon emergence than inhaled anesthesia. Neuroprotection in cord-damaged patients is disappointing, and the controversy on the efficacy of high-dose methylprednisolone is not closed. Nevertheless, maintenance of homeostasis remains the cornerstone of neuroprotection. SUMMARY: Subtle details differentiate the management of emergent and elective unstable C-spine patients. In both situations, the presence or the absence of a neurological insult governs the therapeutic strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailPerioperative management of a child with von Willebrand disease undergoing surgical repair of craniosynostosis: looking at unusual targets.
Maquoi, Isabelle ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Born, Jacques Daniel et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2009), 109(3), 720-4

We report the successful management of a craniosynostosis repair in a child with severe Type I von Willebrand disease diagnosed during the preoperative assessment and treated by coagulation factor VIII ... [more ▼]

We report the successful management of a craniosynostosis repair in a child with severe Type I von Willebrand disease diagnosed during the preoperative assessment and treated by coagulation factor VIII and ristocetin cofactor. Collaboration among the anesthesiologist, the neurosurgeon, the clinical pathologist, and the pediatric hematologist is important for successful management. [less ▲]

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See detailAcid-base status and hemodynamic stability during propofol and sevoflurane-based anesthesia in patients undergoing uncomplicated intracranial surgery.
Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Demoitie, Jeannick ULg; Schaub, Isabelle ULg et al

in Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology (2009), 21(2), 112-9

Propofol anesthesia may induce metabolic disturbances and sevoflurane anesthesia arterial hypotension. This study compares both techniques regarding acid-base and hemodynamic status during intracranial ... [more ▼]

Propofol anesthesia may induce metabolic disturbances and sevoflurane anesthesia arterial hypotension. This study compares both techniques regarding acid-base and hemodynamic status during intracranial surgery. Sixty-one patients were randomized into 2 groups according to anesthesia maintenance, a propofol group (n=30), and a sevoflurane group (n=31). The anesthesia protocol including rocuronium and remifentanil infusion was otherwise similar in both groups. Arterial blood samples were drawn every 2 hours during the procedure and upon arrival in the intensive care unit to assess acid-base status. The number of hypotensive and hypertensive events served to assess hemodynamic stability. Metabolic acidosis was more frequent during propofol than sevoflurane anesthesia (7 out of 29 and 1 out of 31, P=0.02). Its severity was linearly correlated with lactate concentration (R=0.32), total dose of propofol (R=0.2), and length of procedure (R=0.28). Hyperlactacidemia was also observed during sevoflurane anesthesia, but without acidosis. Hypertension occurred more frequently during propofol than sevoflurane anesthesia (13 out of 30 vs. 1 out of 31, P<0.001), particularly in patients with a past medical history of hypertension. Higher remifentanil infusion rates reduced the risk of hypertension. Conversely, sevoflurane anesthesia favored arterial hypotension (22 out of 31 vs. 12 out of 30, P=0.015). Preoperative morning administration of antihypertensive medications to patients with a history of arterial hypertension was associated with a low probability of hypertensive events, at the cost of more frequent hypotension. In conclusion, propofol anesthesia for intracranial surgery is more frequently associated with lactic acidosis and hypertension; sevoflurane anesthesia may favor arterial hypotension. [less ▲]

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See detailAwake craniotomy
Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Franssen, Colette ULg; Hans, Pol ULg

in European Journal of Anaesthesiology (2009), 26(11), 906-912

Awake craniotomy has become an increasingly frequent procedure. In this paper, the principles of its anaesthetic management are reviewed. The means allowing achievement of anaesthetic objectives are ... [more ▼]

Awake craniotomy has become an increasingly frequent procedure. In this paper, the principles of its anaesthetic management are reviewed. The means allowing achievement of anaesthetic objectives are described, with emphasis on points that determine success of the procedure. A careful and adequate selection and preparation of patients are mandatory, and the intervening team must be a skilled team. Choosing an awake technique or general anaesthesia depends on several factors, including the risk of obstructive apnoea, seizures, nausea and vomiting, patient's ability to cooperate, and localization of lesions. The main challenge of intraoperative anaesthetic management relies on the ability of rapidly adjusting the level of sedation and analgesia according to the sequence of surgical events, while ensuring haemodynamic stability, adequate ventilation, and minimal interference with eventual eletrophysiological recordings. Throughout the procedure, complications must be anticipated and managed according to predefined guidelines. More prospective randomized clinical trials are still needed to improve safety and efficacy of awake craniotomies, as well as to validate this technique in comparison with more conventional anaesthetic management. [less ▲]

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See detailBispectral index correlates with regional cerebral blood flow during sleep in distinct cortical and subcortical structures in humans.
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg et al

in Archives Italiennes de Biologie (2009), 147(1-2), 51-7

The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS), an EEG-based monitor of anesthesia, and brain activity is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between changes in BIS ... [more ▼]

The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS), an EEG-based monitor of anesthesia, and brain activity is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between changes in BIS values during natural sleep and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) variations, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Data were obtained from six young, healthy, right-handed, male volunteers (20-30 years old) using the H2(15)O infusion method. PET scans were performed both during waking and various stages of sleep. BIS values were monitored continuously and recorded during each PET scan. Positive correlations were detected between BIS and rCBF values in dorsolateral prefontal, parietal, anterior and posterior cingulate, precuneal, mesiofrontal, mesiotemporal and insular cortices. These areas belong to a frontoparietal network known to be related to awareness of self conscious sensory perception, attention and memory. BIS values also positively correlated with activity in brainstem and thalami, both structures known to be involved in arousal and wakefulness. These results show that BIS changes associated with physiological sleep depth co-vary with the activity of specific cortical and subcortical areas. The latter are known to modulate arousal, which in turn allows sustained thalamo-cortical enhancement of activity in a specific frontoparietal network known to be related to the content of consciousness. Thus, although mainly derived from frontal EEG, BIS could represent a wider index of cerebral activity. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effect of Clonidine Infusion on Distribution of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Volunteers
Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2008), 106(3), 899-909

BACKGROUND: Through their action on the locus coeruleus, alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists induce rapidly reversible sedation while partially preserving cognitive brain functions. Our goal in this ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Through their action on the locus coeruleus, alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists induce rapidly reversible sedation while partially preserving cognitive brain functions. Our goal in this observational study was to map brain regions whose activity is modified by clonidine infusion so as to better understand its loci of action, especially in relation to sedation. METHODS: Six ASA I-II right-handed volunteers were recruited. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was monitored continuously. After a baseline H2(15)O activation scan, clonidine infusion was started at a rate ranging from 6 to 10 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1). A sequence of 11 similar scans was then performed at 8 min intervals. Plasma clonidine concentration was measured. Using statistical parametric mapping, we sought linear correlations between normalized regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), an indicator of regional brain activity, and plasma clonidine concentration or spindle EEG activity. RESULTS: Clonidine induced clinical sedation and EEG patterns (spindles) comparable to early stage nonrapid eye movement sleep. A significant negative linear correlation between clonidine concentration and rCBF or spindle activity was observed in the thalamus, prefrontal, orbital and parietal association cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus. CONCLUSIONS: The EEG patterns and decreases in rCBF of specific brain regions observed during clonidine-induced sedation are similar to those of early stage nonrapid eye movement sleep. Patterns of deactivated brain regions are also comparable to those observed during general anesthesia or vegetative state, reinforcing the hypothesis that alterations in the activity of a common network occur during these modified conscious states. [less ▲]

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See detailDelta down compared with delta pulse as an indicator of volaemia during intracranial surgery
Deflandre, Eric; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Hans, Pol ULg

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2008), 100(2), 245-250

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See detailBrain function in physiologically, pharmacologically, and pathologically altered states of consciousness
Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in International Anesthesiology Clinics (2008), 46(3), 131-146

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See detailIncreased analgesic requirements associated with induced labour are related to dystocia
Sougné, Christelle; Dewandre, Pierre-Yves ULg; Hans, Pol ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2008), 59(3), 229

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See detailEffect of propofol and sevoflurane on coughing in smokers and non-smokers awakening from general anaesthesia at the end of a cervical spine surgery.
Hans, Pol ULg; Marechal, Hugues ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2008), 101(5), 731-7

BACKGROUND: Coughing during emergence from general anaesthesia may be detrimental, particularly after cervical spine surgery. We compared the effect of propofol or sevoflurane anaesthesia on the incidence ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Coughing during emergence from general anaesthesia may be detrimental, particularly after cervical spine surgery. We compared the effect of propofol or sevoflurane anaesthesia on the incidence and severity of coughing during recovery in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery via an anterior approach. As a secondary aim, we also evaluated the influences of smoking and estimated residual anaesthetic agent concentrations on coughing. METHODS: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in a randomized prospective, double-blind study to receive either propofol (PPF) or sevoflurane (SEVO) for maintenance of anaesthesia. The decision to perform tracheal extubation was based on specified criteria, including resumption of spontaneous respiration and consciousness. During emergence from anaesthesia and extubation, coughing was observed and graded at predefined times. RESULTS: The incidence of severe coughing was higher in the SEVO group than in the PPF group (59% and 6%, respectively), and also in smokers than in non-smokers (50% and 17%, respectively). The peak incidence of coughing was at tracheal extubation. The probability of coughing was influenced by the estimated residual concentration of anaesthetic agents at extubation, except for smokers in the SEVO group who were at the highest risk of coughing. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of coughing after cervical spine surgery when tracheal extubation is performed according to clinical criteria is lower after propofol anaesthesia compared with sevoflurane anaesthesia. Smokers are at increased risk of coughing, independently of the type of anaesthesia maintenance. Higher residual concentrations of anaesthetic agents decrease the probability of coughing, except for smokers anaesthetized with sevoflurane. [less ▲]

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See detailBispectral Index profile during carotid cross clamping
Bonhomme, Vincent ULg; Desiron, Quentin ULg; Lemineur, Thierry et al

in Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology (2007), 19(1), 49-55

This study aimed at investigating the Bispectral Index (BIS) profile during carotid cross clamping (CXC). The study involved a pilot group of 10 patients undergoing routine carotid endarterectomy with ... [more ▼]

This study aimed at investigating the Bispectral Index (BIS) profile during carotid cross clamping (CXC). The study involved a pilot group of 10 patients undergoing routine carotid endarterectomy with shunt insertion under total intravenous anesthesia, and a study group of 26 additional patients. In all patients, rates of propofol and remifentanil providing a steady-state level of hypnosis (BIS: 40-60) were maintained constant throughout a recording period ranging from 3 minutes before CXC to shunt insertion. BIS was recorded throughout this period and the internal carotid backflow observed at the time of shunt insertion was graded as good, moderate, or poor. In addition, A-Line Autoregressive Index (AAI) and processed electroencephalogram (EEG) parameters were recorded in patients of the study group. All parameters were averaged over I minute before CXC, at CXC, 1, 2, and 3 minutes after CXC, and at shunt insertion. Statistical analysis was performed using X 2, Friedman, and Spearman correlation tests. For technical reasons, reliable AAI, BIS monitor-derived, and other processed EEG data were obtained in 24, 25, and 18 patients of the study group, respectively. During the first 3 minutes after CXC, BIS increased over 60 [68.8 (6.1)] in 47%, decreased below 40 [34.9 (4.4)] in 25%, and remained in the 40 to 60 range in 28% of all recruited patients. A BIS increase was more frequently observed in patients with moderate or poor than in those with good internal carotid backflow (78, 67, and 29%, respectively). It was significantly correlated to an increase in AAI and EEG amplitude, a decrease in EEG suppression ratio, and a shorter time between induction of anesthesia and CXC. A BIS decrease was significantly correlated to an increase in suppression ratio and a longer time between induction and CXC. In conclusion, during CXC under a constant level of intravenous anesthesia, BIS may increase, decrease, or remain unchanged. The paradoxical BIS increase could be related to borderline ischemia, a change in brain anesthetic agent concentration, or a change in the nociceptive-antinociceptive balance associated with a CXC-elicited painful stimulation. Caution should be used when interpreting BIS value during CXC. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of an intubation dose of rocuronium on Spectral Entropy and Bispectral Index (TM) responses to laryngoscopy during propofol anaesthesia
Hans, Pol ULg; Giwer, Jérôme ULg; Brichant, Jean-François ULg et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2006), 97(6), 842-847

Background. The spectral entropy of the electroencephalogram has been proposed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. State Entropy (SE) reflects the level of hypnosis. Response Entropy (RE), computed from ... [more ▼]

Background. The spectral entropy of the electroencephalogram has been proposed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. State Entropy (SE) reflects the level of hypnosis. Response Entropy (RE), computed from electroencephalogram and facial muscle activity, reflects the response to nociceptive stimulation. We evaluated the effect of rocuronium on Bispectral Index (TM) (BIS) and entropy responses to laryngoscopy. Methods. A total of 25 patients were anaesthetized with propofol using a target-controlled infusion. At steady state, they randomly received 0.6 mg kg(-1) rocuronium (R) or saline (S). After 3 min, a 20 s laryngoscopy was applied. BIS, RE and SE were recorded continuously and averaged over 1 min during baseline, at steady state, 2 min after R or S administration (R/S+2) and 0, 1, 2 and 3 min after laryngoscopy (L0, L1, L2, L3). Results. At R/S+2, the RE-SE gradient was higher in Group S than in Group R. Laryngoscopy provoked an increase in BIS, RE and SE. Comparing R/S+2 and L0 values in Groups R and S, BIS increased from 43 (6) to 49 (8) and 42 (9) to 51 (15), SE increased from 43 (7) to 50 (8) and 41 (10) to 55 (12), and RE increased from 46 (8) to 54 (9) and 47 (12) to 66 (15), respectively. BIS and SE did not differ between groups. At L0, RE and RE-SE were higher in Group S [66 (15) and 11 (4), respectively] than in Group R [54 (9) and 4 (2), respectively]. Conclusions. Rocuronium alters the RE-SE gradient and the RE and RE-SE responses to laryngoscopy. Muscle relaxation may confound interpretation of entropy monitoring. [less ▲]

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