References of "Aubinet, Marc"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFifty years of contrasted residue management of an agricultural crop: impacts on the soil carbon budget and on heterotrophic respiration.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Roisin, Christian; Aubinet, Marc ULg

in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment (2013), 167

Crop management exerts a strong influence on the soil carbon (C) balance. This study investigated a long-term experiment initiated in 1959 at a site in the Hesbaye region of Belgium and focused on three ... [more ▼]

Crop management exerts a strong influence on the soil carbon (C) balance. This study investigated a long-term experiment initiated in 1959 at a site in the Hesbaye region of Belgium and focused on three contrasted treatments: residue export (RE), farmyard manure (FYM) addition and residue restitution (RR) after harvest. The objectives were to quantify the components of the C budget of croplands from a 50-year perspective and to identify the impact of the treatments on this budget and soil C sequestration, given the relatively low levels of esidue application. The soil C budget was calculated for each treatment on the basis of total soil organic C (SOC) content measurements and C input data collected since the experiment had begun and drawn from the literature. To evaluate the robustness of this approach, the budget-based output estimates were compared with annual heterotrophic respiration (HR) averages extrapolated from seasonal field HR measurements carried out at the same experimental site in 2010. The soil C budgetbased output estimates accorded well with field-based HR measurements and with most HR estimates in the literature, suggesting that, despite the many uncertainties affecting the soil C budget, these results were robust. The three treatments investigated in this study had different impacts on SOC stocks, mainly during the first 20 years of the experiment. RE and FYM caused significant SOC decreases (on average, −7 ± 5 g C m−2 year−1 over the 50 years) and increases (10 ± 5 g C m−2 year−1), espectively, whereas RR had no significant impact on the SOC stocks. The study also showed (i) the very large part (about twothirds of the total input) that represented the below-ground input, weeds and other left-over residues in the C budget, (ii) the important role probably played by residue quality in C sequestration and (iii) the large proportion of C lost annually rom the soil (which represents 93–98, 100 and 102–107% of the amounts of fresh residue rought to the soil each year in the FYM, RR and RE treatments, respectively). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailShort-term temperature impact on soil heterotrophic respiration in limed agricultural soil samples
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Goffin, Stéphanie ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg et al

in Biogeochemistry (2013), 112(1-3), 441-455

This study sought to investigate the hourly and daily timescale responses of soil CO2 fluxes to temperature in a limed agricultural soil. Observations from different incubation experiments were compared ... [more ▼]

This study sought to investigate the hourly and daily timescale responses of soil CO2 fluxes to temperature in a limed agricultural soil. Observations from different incubation experiments were compared with the results of a model combining biotic (heterotrophic respiration) and abiotic (carbonate weathering) components. Several samples were pre-incubated for 8-9 days at three temperatures (5, 15 and 25°C) and then submitted to short-term temperature cycles (where the temperature was increased from 5 to 35°C in 10°C stages, with each stage being 3 h long). During the temperature cycles (hourly timescale), the soil CO2 fluxes increased significantly with temperature under all pre-incubation temperature treatments. A hysteresis effect and negative fluxes during cooling phases were also systematically observed. At a given hourly timescale temperature, there was a negative relationship of the CO2 fluxes with the pre-incubation temperature. Using the combined model allowed the experimental results to be clearly described, including the negative fluxes and the hysteresis effect, showing the potentially large contribution of abiotic fluxes to total fluxes in limed soils, after short-term temperature changes. The fairly good agreement between the measured and simulated flux results also suggested that the biotic flux temperature sensitivity was probably unaffected by timescale (hourly or daily) or pre-incubation temperature. The negative relationship of the CO2 fluxes with the pre-incubation temperature probably derived from very labile soil carbon depletion, as shown in the simulations. This was not, however, confirmed by soil carbon measurements, which leaves open the possibility of adaptation within the microbial community. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (18 ULg)
Full Text
See detail10. Environnement et gaz à effet de serre
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg

in Bodson, Bernard; Destain, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Livre Blanc - Céréales (2013, February 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluxes of the greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) above a short-rotation poplar plantation after conversion from agricultural land
Zona, Donatella; Janssens, I.A.; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2013), 169

The increasing demand for renewable energy may lead to the conversion of millions of hectares into bioenergy plantations with a possible substantial transitory carbon (C) loss. In this study we report on ... [more ▼]

The increasing demand for renewable energy may lead to the conversion of millions of hectares into bioenergy plantations with a possible substantial transitory carbon (C) loss. In this study we report on the greenhouse gas fluxes (CO2, CH4, and N2O) measured using eddy covariance of a short-rotation bioenergy poplar plantation converted from agricultural fields. During the first six months after the establishment of the plantation (June–December 2010) there were substantial CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions (a total of 5.36 ± 0.52 Mg CO2eq ha−1 in terms of CO2 equivalents). Nitrous oxide loss mostly occurred during a week-long peak emission after an unusually large rainfall. This week-long N2O emission represented 52% of the entire N2O loss during one and an half years of measurements. As most of the N2O loss occurred in just this week-long period, accurately capturing these emission events are critical to accurate estimates of the GHG balance of bioenergy. While initial establishment (June–December 2010) of the plantation resulted in a net CO2 loss into the atmosphere (2.76 ± 0.16 Mg CO2eq ha−1), in the second year (2011) there was substantial net CO2 uptake (−3.51 ± 0.56 Mg CO2eq ha−1). During the entire measurement period, CH4 was a source to the atmosphere (0.63 ± 0.05 Mg CO2eq ha−1 in 2010, and 0.49 ± 0.05 Mg CO2eq ha−1 in 2011), and was controlled by water table depth. Importantly, over the entire measurement period, the sum of the CH4 and N2O losses was much higher (3.51 ± 0.52 Mg CO2eq ha−1) than the net CO2 uptake (−0.76 ± 0.58 Mg CO2eq ha−1). As water vailability was an important control on the GHG emission of the plantation, expected climate change and altered rainfall pattern could increase the negative environmental impacts of bioenergy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong term measurements of volatile organic compounds exchanges above a maize field at Lonzee (Belgium)
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; SALERNO, Giovanni ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013, February), 78(1), 127-132

VOC (volatile organic compounds) include a wide set of molecules which are mostly emitted by the plants. Atmospheric scientists are strongly interested in these compounds because of their important role ... [more ▼]

VOC (volatile organic compounds) include a wide set of molecules which are mostly emitted by the plants. Atmospheric scientists are strongly interested in these compounds because of their important role in the atmospheric chemistry and their final impact on air pollution and climate change. Evaluation of current and future VOC emissions is thus necessary and requires a comprehensive understanding of VOC production and exchange dynamics under a wide panel of climatic conditions and ecosystems. Forest and non pastured grasslands have been largely studied for the last decade. However, knowledge about VOC fluxes from croplands remains scarce. Our study focuses on the VOC exchanges between a maize field and the atmosphere. It is incorporated in a wider project that aims to study VOC fluxes from two croplands (maize and winter wheat) and a pastured grassland. VOC fluxes have been measured on a maize field during the whole growing season using a micrometeorological method (eddy covariance). While first results show half-hourly bidirectionnal exchanges among all the preselected compounds, in average methanol stands for the greatest emitted VOC, followed by green leaf volatiles, and acetic acid is the greatest taken up VOC. Small isoprene and monoterpenes fluxes are also observed. A diurnal pattern is found for all those VOC, with greater emission/uptake during the day, suggesting a flux dependence on environmental parameters. These environmental controls will be further investigated [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 123 (16 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCurrent net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a young mixed forest: any heritage from the previous ecosystem?
Violette, Aurélie ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Erpicum, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2013)

For 15 years, networks of flux towers have been developed to determine accurate carbon balance with the eddy-covariance method and determine if forests are sink or source of carbon. However, for ... [more ▼]

For 15 years, networks of flux towers have been developed to determine accurate carbon balance with the eddy-covariance method and determine if forests are sink or source of carbon. However, for prediction of the evolution of carbon cycle and climate, major uncertainties remain on the ecosystem respiration (Reco, which includes the respiration of above ground part of trees, roots respiration and mineralization of the soil organic matter), the gross primary productivity (GPP) and their difference, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of forests. These uncertainties are consequences of spatial and inter-annual variability, driven by previous and current climatic conditions, as well as by the particular history of the site (management, diseases, etc.). In this study we focus on the carbon cycle in two mixed forests in the Belgian Ardennes. The first site, Vielsalm, is a mature stand mostly composed of beeches (Fagus sylvatica) and douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) from 80 to 100 years old. The second site, La Robinette, was covered before 1995 with spruces. After an important windfall and a clear cutting, the site was replanted, between 1995 and 2000, with spruces (Piceas abies) and deciduous species (mostly Betula pendula, Aulnus glutinosa and Salix aurita). The challenge here is to highlight how initial conditions can influence the current behavior of the carbon cycle in a growing stand compared to a mature one, where initial conditions are supposed to be forgotten. A modeling approach suits particularly well for sensitivity tests and estimation of the temporal lag between an event and the ecosystem response. We use the forest ecosystem model ASPECTS (Rasse et al., Ecological Modelling 141, 35-52, 2001). This model predicts long-term forest growth by calculating, over time, hourly NEE. It was developed and already validated on the Vielsalm forest. Modelling results are confronted to eddy-covariance data on both sites from 2006 to 2011. The main difference between both sites seems to rely on soil respiration, which is probably partly a heritage of the previous ecosystem at the young forest site. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailInitiation of methane turbulent flux measurements over a grazed grassland in Belgium
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Chopin, Henri ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2013), 15

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStockage de carbone et flux de gaz à effet de serre en prairie (synthèse bibliographique)
Jerome, Elisabeth ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2013), 17(1), 103-117

Grassland carbon (C) sequestration can play an important role in mitigating total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of livestock production systems. An accurate inventory of livestock production system ... [more ▼]

Grassland carbon (C) sequestration can play an important role in mitigating total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of livestock production systems. An accurate inventory of livestock production system contribution to GHG emissions requires to think in terms of global budget, by considering both the GHG sources and the mitigation potential trough grassland soil carbon sequestration. There is a huge variability in C and GHG balances of grasslands that is mainly due to management practices and climatic conditions. The present article shows that, to reduce the uncertainties of the results, long term measurements at the field scale are necessary. Also, it shows the importance of taking the fluxes of the three main GHGs (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane) into account when calculating the GHG budget. This article also highlights the need for a better understanding of the mechanisms driving the fluxes, in relation to environmental factors and management practices, in order to propose mitigation strategies able to enhance soil carbon sequestration in soils and to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of the potential of MODIS satellite data to predict vegetation phenology in different biomes: An investigation using ground-based NDVI measurements
Hmimina, G.; Dufrêne, Eric; Pontailler, J.-Y. et al

in Remote Sensing of Environment (2013), (132), 145-158

Vegetation phenology is the st udy of the timing of seasonal events that are considered to be the result of adaptive responses to climate variations on short and long time scales. In the field of remote ... [more ▼]

Vegetation phenology is the st udy of the timing of seasonal events that are considered to be the result of adaptive responses to climate variations on short and long time scales. In the field of remote sensing of vegetation phenology, phenologicalmetrics are derived fromtime series of optical data. For that purpose, considerable effort has been specifically focused on developing noise reduction and cloud-contaminated data removal techniques to improve the quality of remotely-sensed time series. Comparative studies between time series composed of satellite data acquired under clear and cloudy conditions and fromradiometric data obtainedwith high accuracy fromground-basedmeasurements constitute a direct and effective way to assess the operational use and limitations of remote sensing for predicting the main plant phenological events. In the present paper, we sought to explicitly evaluate the potential use of MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) remote sensing data for monitoring the seasonal dynamics of different types of vegetation cover that are representative of the major terrestrial biomes, including temperate deciduous forests, evergreen forests, African savannah, and crops. After cloud screening and filtering, we compared the temporal patterns and phenological metrics derived from in situ NDVI time series and from MODIS daily and 16-composite products. We also evaluated the effects of residual noise and the in uence of data gaps in MODIS NDVI time series on the identification of the most relevant metrics for vegetation phenology monitoring. The results show that the in exion points of a model fitted to a MODIS NDVI time series allow accurate estimates of the onset of greenness in the spring and the onset of yellowing in the autumn in deciduous forests (RMSE<oneweek). Phenologicalmetrics identical to those providedwith theMODIS Global Vegetation Phenology product (MDC12Q2) are less robust to data gaps, and they can be subject to large biases of approximately twoweeks or more during the autumn phenological transitions. In the evergreen forests, in situ NDVI time series describe the phenology with high fidelity despite small temporal changes in the canopy foliage. However, MODIS is unable to provide consistent phenological patterns. In crops and savannah, MODIS NDVI time series reproduce the general temporal patterns of phenology, but significant discrepancies appear between MODIS and ground-based NDVI time series during very localized periods of time depending on the weather conditions and spatial heterogeneity within the MODIS pixel. In the rainforest, the temporal pattern exhibited by a MODIS 16-day composite NDVI time series ismore likely due to a pattern of noise in the NDVI data structure according to both rainy and dry seasons rather than to phenological changes. More investigations are needed, but in all cases, this result leads us to conclude that MODIS time series in tropical rainforests should be interpreted with great caution. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHorizon Partitioning of soil CO2 sources and their Isotopic Composition (13C) in a Pinus Sylvestris
Goffin, Stéphanie ULg; Parent, Florian; Plain, Caroline et al

Poster (2012, December 07)

The overall aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms behind soil CO2 efflux using carbon stable isotopes. Given (i) the interest of conducting in situ studies with soil ... [more ▼]

The overall aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms behind soil CO2 efflux using carbon stable isotopes. Given (i) the interest of conducting in situ studies with soil multilayer analysis and (ii) the benefits of isotopic tool to improve mechanistic understanding, these two approaches are combined. Quantifying the origin and the determinism of 13CO2 and 12CO2 production processes in the different soil layers using the gradient-efflux approach is the main goal of this work. To meet this one, the work includes an experimental setup and a modeling approach. The experimental set up (see also communication of Parent et al., session B008) comprised a combination of different systems, which were installed in a Scot Pine temperate forest at the Hartheim site (Southwestern Germany). Measurements include (i) half hourly vertical profiles of soil CO2 concentration (using soil CO2 probes), soil water content and temperature; (ii) half hourly soil surface CO2 effluxes (automatic chambers); (iii) half hourly isotopic composition of surface CO2 efflux and soil CO2 concentration profile and (iv) estimation of soil diffusivity through laboratory measurements conducted on soil samples taken at several depths. Using the data collected in the experimental part, we developed and used a diffusive transport model to simulate CO2 (13CO2 and 12CO2) flows inside and out of the soil based on Fick’s law. Given the horizontal homogeneity of soil physical parameters in Hartheim, we treated the soil as a structure consisting of distinctive layers of 5 cm thick and expressed the fick’s first law in a discrete formalism. The diffusion coefficient used in each layer was derived from (i) horizon specific relationships, obtained from laboratory measurements, between soil relative diffusivity and its water content and (ii) the soil water content values measured in situ. The concentration profile was obtained from in situ measurements. So, the main model inputs are the profiles of (i) CO2 (13CO2 and 12CO2) concentration, (ii) soil diffusion coefficient and (iii) soil water content. Once the diffusive fluxes deduced at each layer interface, the CO2 (13CO2 and 12CO2) production profile was calculated using the (discretized) mass balance equation in each layer. The results of the Hartheim measurement campaign will be presented. The CO2 source vertical profile and its link with the root and the Carbon organic content distribution will be showed. The dynamic of CO2 sources and their isotopic signature will be linked to climatic variables such soil temperature and soil water content. For example, we will show that the dynamics of CO2 sources was mainly related to temperature while changing of isotopic signature was more correlated to soil moisture. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailIdentification of bacteria community associated with earthworm gut
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULg; Alabi, Taofic; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2012, July 26)

The role of earthworms in soil fertility and transformation of organic waste was regulary cited to be of first importance. Associated to these macro-invertebrates, a large diversity of micro-orgnisms are ... [more ▼]

The role of earthworms in soil fertility and transformation of organic waste was regulary cited to be of first importance. Associated to these macro-invertebrates, a large diversity of micro-orgnisms are found indirectly in their closed environment or directly in their gut. Functional aspects of these interactions and symbiosis in relation with soil characteristics and fertility rates are poorly developed. Here, the micro-organisms diversity and potential related functions of earthworm gut were investigated using a proteiomic approach for both protein and micro-organism identifications. Microbial community investigation was detected by proteomic approach based on bidimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation – time of flight (Maldi-Tof). Diversity of gut associated bacterial communities was discussed. Indeed, application of particular crop production practices such as crop residue management at the field level could regulate the gut bacterial communities in earthworm but also microbials in soils. Agricultural systems had to consider the microbial and associated organisms in the soil to enhance fertlility and crop production in sustainable ways. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (13 ULg)
See detailSoil carbon budget of a 50-year residue management experiment in a Belgian cropland.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Roisin, Christian; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Conference (2012, July 06)

Within the context of Climate Change, crop management exerts a strong influence on the soil carbon (C) balance. This study aims (1) to estimate the C loss by soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR) in ... [more ▼]

Within the context of Climate Change, crop management exerts a strong influence on the soil carbon (C) balance. This study aims (1) to estimate the C loss by soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR) in different residue management treatments through the establishment of their soil C budgets and (2) to compare these estimations with field SHR measurements. Three contrasted treatments were considered: Residue Export (RE), Farm Yard Manure addition (FYM) and Residue Restitution after harvest (RR). They were established in 1959 and continuously applied since then at an experimental field located in the Hesbaye region in Belgium. The soil C budget was calculated for each treatment on the basis of total soil organic C content measurements and C input data compiled since the beginning of the experiment. This allowed estimating the C loss by SHR in the different treatments. SHR measurements were performed in 2010 and 2011 to compare them with the budget-based estimations and to assess SHR sensitivity to temperature in the different treatments. The soil C budgets showed that the soil under the RR treatment was likely to undergo the biggest C loss by SHR since the beginning of the experiment. The SHR field measurements, performed 50 years after the experiment had begun, did however not show any significant difference between the SHR rates in the three treatments. Laboratory investigations (microbial biomass, basal respiration, metabolic diversity and soil fractionation) will be performed to better understand the effects of long-term residue management on soil C dynamics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpact of soil management on earthworm diversity according to differential plowing and plant residue incorporation
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULg; Alabi, Taofic; Zirbes, Lara ULg et al

Poster (2012, July 02)

Earthworms are largely distributed in terrestrial ecosystems and their abundance and diversity in soils are significantly affected by biotic (macro- and micro-organisms) and abiotic factors: soil ... [more ▼]

Earthworms are largely distributed in terrestrial ecosystems and their abundance and diversity in soils are significantly affected by biotic (macro- and micro-organisms) and abiotic factors: soil properties (pH, texture, structure…); agricultural management system and climate change. Here, tillage effect of earthworm population combined with crops residual management was investigated and correlated with soils properties. From wheat experimental field plots, the diversity of earthworm according to the field crop management was assessed. Application of particular crop production practices such as the integration of different levels of crop residues, diverse parts of wheat straws, at the field level regulate earthworm diversity and population abundance. Indeed, tillage reduced earthworm population with a 35% rate also corresponding to changes in soil properties. Agricultural practices had to be adapted to include consideration on macro-invertebrate abundance and diversity to maintain efficient soil fertility and allow sustainable crop production [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (14 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCarbon balance of an intensive grazed grassland
Jerome, Elisabeth ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2012, April 23)

This work seeks to analyze the C balance of a Belgian grassland grazed by the “Blanc Bleu Belge” breed of cattle. The site is located at Dorinne in the Belgian Condroz (50° 18’ 44’’ N; 4° 58’ 07’’ E; 248 ... [more ▼]

This work seeks to analyze the C balance of a Belgian grassland grazed by the “Blanc Bleu Belge” breed of cattle. The site is located at Dorinne in the Belgian Condroz (50° 18’ 44’’ N; 4° 58’ 07’’ E; 248 m asl.). It is permanent grassland of ca. 4.2 ha with a moderate slope of 1 to 2 %. Homogeneity and topography criteria are met to ensure high quality turbulent flux measurements. The experimental field was equipped with an eddy covariance system. Flux correction, quality control and data gap filling were performed following standardised procedures. This device was completed by a micrometeorological station that measured temperature and humidity respectively in the air and within the soil, radiation, atmospheric pressure and precipitations. Carbon exported through mowing (CNBP,export), imported through compost application (CNBP,import) or through complementary feeds for cattle (CNBP,complement) was also measured. In addition, the vegetation development was followed in order to estimate herbage production and dry matter intake by grazing animals. Carbon lost through CH4 emissions (CNBP,CH4) was finally estimated, allowing the establishment of a full C budget. After one year of measurements (May 2010 - May 2011), the grassland was a net CO2 source (Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) = 172 ± 94 g C m-2 year-1). Net Biome Productivity (NBP) was calculated from NEE by taking into account imports and export of organic C and losses of carbon as CH4. Contribution of CNBP,CH4 to NBP was small as it was 12 ± 1 g C m-2 year-1. The balance between CNBP,import and CNBP,export created not such a large departure of NBP from NEE, which is not the case of CNBP,complement. The NBP was finally estimated at 102 ± 95 g C m-2 year-1. At this stage, it is premature to conclude about the sink or source behaviour of the plot because the NBP value is very close to its uncertainty. Moreover, this result was obtained under particular climate conditions, characterised by drought during summer 2010 and spring 2011. First year full carbon budget will be discussed in relation with climate conditions and management practices. A second year of measurements will be also presented. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in wheat fields
Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valérie; Buysse, Pauline ULg et al

Conference (2012, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpact of cultivation practices on soil respiration
Dufranne, Delphine ULg; Vancutsem, Françoise ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2012, February 10)

Cultivation practices are known to induce a modification of soil organic matter quantity, quality and spatial distribution, which may impact dry matter decomposition kinetics. In order to bring answers to ... [more ▼]

Cultivation practices are known to induce a modification of soil organic matter quantity, quality and spatial distribution, which may impact dry matter decomposition kinetics. In order to bring answers to these questions, a multidisciplinary project (SOLRESIDUS) was set up by the University of Liege, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech in collaboration with Walloon Agricultural Research Centre (CRA-W). The aim was to investigate the impact of cultivation practices (tillage and residue restitution) on crop growth, yield and environment, as well as on soil properties and on activities. In the present study, we focused on the impacts on soil respiration soil for 3 years. We will present our first results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (8 ULg)
Full Text
See detail50 Years of contrasted residue management in an agricultural crop: impacts on the soil carbon budget and on heterotrophic respiration.
Buysse, Pauline ULg; Roisin, Christian; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Poster (2012, February 10)

This study aims to estimate the carbon (C) loss by soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR) in three contrasted residue management treatments (Residue Export, Farm Yard Manure addition and Residue Restitution ... [more ▼]

This study aims to estimate the carbon (C) loss by soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR) in three contrasted residue management treatments (Residue Export, Farm Yard Manure addition and Residue Restitution after harvest) through the establishment of soil C budgets, and to compare these estimations with field SHR measurements. The soil C budgets were calculated in each case on the basis of total soil organic C content and C input data compiled since the beginning of the experiment in Belgium, 50 years ago. SHR fluxes were measured in 2010 and 2011 to compare them with the budget-based estimates and to assess SHR sensitivity to temperature. The comparison suggested that the treatment receiving the largest C input does not necessarily sequestrate the most C or produce the largest CO2 fluxes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)