References of "Aubinet, Marc"
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See detailModelisation de la reponse des flux de respiration d'un sol forestier selon les principales variables climatiques.
Perrin, Dominique ULg; Laitat, E.; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2004), 8(1),

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See detailModel Of Forest Carbon Sequestration Incorporating Aerial Wood Radiative Budget
Longdoz, B.; Aubinet, Marc ULg; François, Louis ULg

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2004), 125(1-2), 83-104

The CHANCE model, simulating CO2, energy and water fluxes in a forest ecosystem, is presented. The components of the simulated canopy are the leaves, the branches, the trunks and the soil. The first three ... [more ▼]

The CHANCE model, simulating CO2, energy and water fluxes in a forest ecosystem, is presented. The components of the simulated canopy are the leaves, the branches, the trunks and the soil. The first three are divided into sunny and shaded zones. The model has been calibrated and validated in comparison with measurements performed in the temperate beech forest of Vielsalm (Belgium). For the reproduction of half-hourly net CO2 fluxes, the quality of the CHANCE results is comparable to other models (systematic error of 14%—0.51 molm−2 s−1, R2 = 0.79). The differences between simulated and measured fluxes result essentially from noise in the data, underestimation of the stomatal conductance during very dry days and heterogeneity of the south, southeast sector (presence of conifer patches). Three sensitivity tests have been performed. The first one, neglecting the contribution of aerial wood in the radiation budget, doubles the annual carbon sequestration (Seco). This trend is strengthened in the second test where common radiative and photosynthetic properties are assigned to leaves and branches. The third test induces a 30% reduction of Seco when the calculation of canopy component temperatures using the complete energy balance is replaced by the use of air temperature. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMethodology for data acquisition, storage and treatment
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Clément, R.; Elbers, J. A. et al

in Valentini, R. (Ed.) Fluxes of Carbon, Water and Energy of European Forests (2003)

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See detailDeciduous forests: carbon and water fluxes balances, ecological and ecophysiological determinants
Granier, A.; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Epron, D. et al

in Valentini, Riccardo (Ed.) Fluxes of Carbon, Water and Energy of European Forests (2003)

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See detailSpruce forests (Norway and Sitka spruce, including Douglas fir): Carbon and water fluxes, Balances, Ecological and ecophysiological determinants
Bernhofer, C.; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Clément, R. et al

in Valentini, Riccardo (Ed.) Fluxes of Carbon, Water and Energy of European Forests (2003)

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See detailA Model Based Study of Carbon Fluxes at Ten European Forest Sites
Falge, E.; Tenhunen, J.; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Valentini, Riccardo (Ed.) Fluxes of Carbon, Water and Energy of European Forests (2003)

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See detailHorizontal And Vertical Co2 Advection In A Sloping Forest
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Yernaux, Michel ULg

in Boundary-Layer Meteorology (2003), 108(3),

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See detailDiurnal Centroid Of Ecosystem Energy And Carbon Fluxes At Fluxnet Sites
Wilson, Kb.; Baldocchi, D.; Falge, E. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Atmospheres (2003), 108(D21),

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See detailPredicting transpiration from forest stands in Belgium for the 21st century
Misson, Laurent; Rasse, Daniel; Vincke, Caroline et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2002), 111(4), 265-282

Canopy transpiration is a major element of the hydrological cycle of temperate forests. Levels of water stress during the 21st century will be largely controlled by the response of canopy transpiration to ... [more ▼]

Canopy transpiration is a major element of the hydrological cycle of temperate forests. Levels of water stress during the 21st century will be largely controlled by the response of canopy transpiration to changing environmental conditions. One year of transpiration measurement in two stands (Quercus robur L. and Fagus sylvatica L.) was used to calibrate the ASPECTS model on a(1) and D-0, two parameters of a modified version of Leuning's equation of stomatal conductance. A second year of data was used to validate the model. The results indicate a higher sensitivity of g(sc), to vapour pressure deficit (DS) in oak than in beech (D-0 (oak) < D-0 (beech)). To simulate future forest transpiration, site specific weather data sets were constructed from GCM outputs, spatially and temporally downscaled with local climatic data. Temperature increase between the end of the 20th and 21st centuries was predicted to be 2.8 degreesC in the beech stand and 3.1 degreesC in the oak stand. Based solely on temperature change, ASPECTS predicted an increase in transpiration of 17% in the beech and 6% in the oak stand, the difference being due to variation in local climate and the sensitivity of both species to D-s. Based solely on increased atmospheric CO2 (355 ppm in 1990 to 700 ppm in 2100), ASPECTS predicted that transpiration would decrease by 22% in beech and 19% in oak. With the combined scenarios of climatic change and increased atmospheric CO2, ASPECTS showed a decrease of 7% in transpired water in the oak stand and only 4% in the beech stand, which are not significant differences from zero. Consequently, water stress should not increase in either stand during the 21st century. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEnergy Partitioning Between Latent And Sensible Heat Flux During The Warm Season At Fluxnet Sites
Wilson, Kell B.; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Water Resources Research (2002), 38(12),

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See detailEnergy Balance Closure At Fluxnet Sites
Wilson, K.; Goldstein, A.; Falge, E. et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2002), 113(1-4),

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See detailSeasonality Of Ecosystem Respiration And Gross Primary Production As Derived From Fluxnet Measurements
Falge, E.; Baldocchi, D.; Tenhunen, J. et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2002), 113(1-4),

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See detailPhase And Amplitude Of Ecosystem Carbon Release And Uptake Potentials As Derived From Fluxnet Measurements
Falge, Eva; Tenhunen, John; Baldocchi, Dennis et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2002), 113(1-4),

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See detailModelling short-term CO2 fluxes and long-term tree growth in temperate forests with ASPECTS
Rasse, Daniel P.; François, Louis ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Ecological Modelling (2001), 141(1-3), 35-52

The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) Of CO2 between temperate forests and the atmosphere governs both carbon removal from the atmosphere and forest growth. In recent years, many experiments have been ... [more ▼]

The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) Of CO2 between temperate forests and the atmosphere governs both carbon removal from the atmosphere and forest growth. In recent years, many experiments have been conducted to determine temperate forest NEE. These data have been used by forest modellers to better understand the processes that govern CO, fluxes, and estimate the evolution of these fluxes under changing environmental conditions. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether models capable of handling short-term processes, which are mostly source-driven, can provide an accurate estimate of long-term forest growth, which is potentially more influenced by sink- and phenology-related processes. To analyse the interactions between short- and long-term processes, we developed the ASPECTS model, which predicts long-term forest growth by integrating, over time, hourly NEE estimates. Validation data consisting of measurements of NEE by eddy-covariance and forest carbon reservoir estimates were obtained from mixed deciduous and evergreen experimental forests located in Belgium. ASPECTS accurately estimated both: (1) the NEE fluxes for several years of data; and (2) the amount of carbon contained in stems, branches, leaves, fine and coarse roots. Our simulations demonstrated that: (1) NEE measurements in Belgian forests are compatible with forest growth over the course of the 20th century, and (2) that forest history and long-term processes need to be considered for accurate simulation of short-term CO2 fluxes. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurements of heat, water vapour and CO2 fluxes above a mixed forest
Aubinet, Marc ULg; Longdoz, Bernard; Yernaux, Michel et al

in Shimizu, H. (Ed.) Carbon dioxide and vegetation : Advanced approaches for absorption of CO2 and responses to CO2 (2001)

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See detailCarbon balance gradient in European forests: should we doubt 'surprising' results? A reply to Piovesan & Adams
Jarvis, P. G.; Dolman, A. J.; Schulze, E. D. et al

in Journal of Vegetation Science (2001), 12(1), 145-150

This paper responds to the Forum contribution by Piovesan & Adams (2000) who criticized the results obtained by the EUROFLUX network on carbon fluxes of several European forests. The major point of ... [more ▼]

This paper responds to the Forum contribution by Piovesan & Adams (2000) who criticized the results obtained by the EUROFLUX network on carbon fluxes of several European forests. The major point of criticism was that the data provided by EUROFLUX are inconsistent with current scientific understanding. It is argued that understanding the terrestrial global carbon cycle requires more than simply restating what was known previously, and that Piovesan & Adams have not been able to show any major conflicts between our findings and ecosystem or atmospheric-transport theories. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon sinks in temperate forests
Martin, Philippe; Nabuurs, G. J.; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Annual Review of Energy & the Environment (2001), 26

In addition to being scientifically exciting, commercially important, and environmentally essential, temperate forests have also become a key diplomatic item in international climate negotiations as ... [more ▼]

In addition to being scientifically exciting, commercially important, and environmentally essential, temperate forests have also become a key diplomatic item in international climate negotiations as potential sinks for carbon. This review presents the methods used to estimate carbon sequestration, identifies the constraints and opportunities for carbon sequestration in temperate forests, addresses the issues raised by the monitoring of carbon sequestration, and analyzes uncertainties pertaining to the sequestration of carbon by temperate forests. This review serves a dual purpose: It aims at informing policy makers about carbon sequestration in temperate forests and at making forest ecologists, biogeochemists, and atmospheric scientists aware of the structure of an international agreement to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions and some of the real, still answered scientific questions that it poses. [less ▲]

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See detailGap Filling Strategies For Long Term Energy Flux Data Sets
Falge, E.; Baldocchi, D.; Olson, R. et al

in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology (2001), 107(1),

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