References of "Art, Tatiana"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of cross country on plasma levels of myeloperoxidase in saddle ponies
Art, Tatiana ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Gangl, M. et al

in Abstracts book of iceep (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of Beclomethasone Dipropionate and Dexamethasone Isonicotinate on Lung Function, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Cytology, and Transcription Factor Expression in Airways of Horses with Recurrent Airway Obstruction
Couetil, L.; Art, Tatiana ULg; de Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2006), 20

Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is recognized to be effective for the treatment of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses. Anti-inflammatory properties of GC are thought to be mediated by suppression of ... [more ▼]

Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is recognized to be effective for the treatment of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses. Anti-inflammatory properties of GC are thought to be mediated by suppression of inflammatory gene expression via inhibition of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-dose inhaled beclomethasone dipropionate and injectable dexamethasone 21- isonicotinate on clinical signs, pulmonary function, airway cytology, and activity of NF-kB and AP-1 in bronchial cells of RAO-affected horses. Seven horses with RAO were exposed to moldy hay until they developed airway obstruction on 3 separate occasions. In a crossover design, they were then treated with a placebo (injection on day 1), inhaled beclomethasone (500 mg q12h for 10 days), or dexamethasone (0.06 mg/kg, IM on day 1) and monitored for 10 days. Pulmonary function, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology, and NF-kB and AP-1 activity in bronchial brushing cells were measured before (day 1) and after treatment (day 10). Treatment with beclomethasone resulted in significantly improved pulmonary function of RAOaffected horses compared with placebo and dexamethasone treatments. However, none of the treatments had an effect on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology or NF-kB and AP-1 activity. These findings reveal that, in a model of severe RAO, the benefits of low-dose inhaled beclomethasone on pulmonary function are not accompanied by a decrease in airway inflammatory cells or a suppression of transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDNA binding activity of transcription factors in bronchial cells of horses with recurrent airway obstruction.
Couetil, Laurent L; Art, Tatiana ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2006), 113(1-2), 11-20

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB ... [more ▼]

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB expression. Studies in experimental asthma models have shown that transcriptions factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1), GATA-3, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) may also play an important role in airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to measure DNA binding activity of these transcription factors in the airways of horses with RAO and to compare it to pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytology. Seven horses with RAO and six control animals were studied during a moldy hay challenge and after 2 months at pasture. Pulmonary function, BALF cytology and transcription factors' activities in bronchial brushings were measured during hay and pasture exposures. During moldy hay challenge, RAO-affected horses developed severe airway obstruction and inflammation and a significantly higher airway AP-1 binding activity than in controls. After 2 months on pasture, pulmonary function and airway AP-1 binding activity were not different between RAO and control horses. The DNA binding activity of CREB in airways of RAO-affected horses increased significantly after 2 months at pasture and became higher than in controls. A significant positive correlation was detected between AP-1 binding activity and indicators of airway obstruction and inflammation. Airway GATA-3, CEBP and CREB binding activities were negatively correlated with indices of airway obstruction. However, contrarily to CREB binding activity, GATA-3 and CEBP binding activities were not different between RAO and control horses and were unaffected by changes in environment. These data support the view that AP-1 and CREB play a role in modulating airway inflammation in horses with RAO [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIdentification de gènes d'intérêt pour le traitement du cheval poussif
Ramery, Eve ULg; Closset, Rodrigue; Salinas, Emmanuelle et al

in Proceedings: AVEF, Versailles, France (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe nez électronique, un nouvel outil diagnostique pour les maladies respiratoires du cheval ?
Salinas, Emmanuelle; Ramery, Eve ULg; Fraipont, Audrey ULg et al

in Proceedings: AVEF, Versailles, France (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTraitements médicaux du système respiratoire: 2-broncho-dilatateurs et autres substances
Van Erck, Emmanuelle ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Pratique Vétérinaire Equine (2006), 38

The medical therapeutic arsenal available to the practitioner for treatment of respiratory conditions in horses is growing because of new drugs being introduced on the market, the marketing authorisation ... [more ▼]

The medical therapeutic arsenal available to the practitioner for treatment of respiratory conditions in horses is growing because of new drugs being introduced on the market, the marketing authorisation obtained for certain existing active ngredients, the possibility of using medicines authorised for humans and the development of aerosoltherapy. Nevertheless treatment remains empirical in the absence of a precise diagnosis, and the use of particular medicines may be unjustified and even erroneous, and in addition treatment fa ures can be discouraging and costly for the owner. However, when the diagnosis is established, combination of several medicines can silmificaxrtly and rapidly improve clinical signs and/or performance, and avoid sequelae and recurrence. In this article brief information is given on management of the environment followed by a very complete list of medicines used in horses with respirrtory conditions. The différent active ingredients available are listed by category and these includé antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, bronchodilatators, mucolytics immune stimulants and other substances. Dosages, indications, pharmacokinetic properties, possible secondary effects and contra-indications are complied from a avide literature review. The essential considerations when deciding which treatment to use are discussed, in particular the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease, the mode of administration and the potential cost [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExercise-induced physiological adjustments to stressful conditions in sports horses
Art, Tatiana ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Livestock Production Science (2005), 92(2), 101-111

Among athletic/sports animals, the horse has a unique ability to increase its oxygen uptake by a factor of 60 during heavy exercise. This is achieved by physiological adaptations of all the links in the ... [more ▼]

Among athletic/sports animals, the horse has a unique ability to increase its oxygen uptake by a factor of 60 during heavy exercise. This is achieved by physiological adaptations of all the links in the oxygen chain. Ventilation is increased by a factor of 30. Since the horse is a compulsory nasal breather, this hyperpnea necessitates high transmural pressure changes, which may be responsible for the dynamic collapse of the airways. Blood flow is increased by a factor of 10. Since the left ventricle is not very compliant, this increase necessitates a high filling pressure in the pulmonary circulation, which may induce capillary stress failure and exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage. Lastly, oxygen transport is improved by splenic contraction which increases haemoglobinemia by 50%. Sports horses frequently suffer from several problems, which are related either to endogenous or exogenous stresses experienced during their career. These stresses, caused by the use of the horse as a competition animal, may lead to several medical problems. At a systemic level, endogenous stresses include hyperkaliemia, lactacidemia, and hyperthermia; oxidative stress may induce problems at a general, and/or a pulmonary level. External factors, e.g. poor quality of inspired air, transport, hot and humid ambient conditions, and microbiological agents, may also induce abnormal body attacks, and lead to health problems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLa "fausse grippe" ou le syndrome inflammatoire des voies aeriennes du cheval de sport
Art, Tatiana ULg; Van Erck, Emmanuelle ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Nouveau Praticien Vétérinaire Equine (2005), (24-juin/juillet/août), 24-28

Objectif: prévenir, reconnaître et traiter le syndrome inflammatoire des voies aériennes du cheval de sport.

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFunction and dysfunction of the lower airways
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg

in Proceedings: 9e Congrès de médecine et chirurgie équine (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTraitement des problèmes du système respiratoire profond
Art, Tatiana ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Proceedings: 9th Congress on Equine Medicine and Surgery (2005)

Lower respiratory troubles in mature sports horses mainly include viral diseases (influenza, rhinopneumonia) ; bacterial diseases (that are generally due to commensal bacteria invading the lower ... [more ▼]

Lower respiratory troubles in mature sports horses mainly include viral diseases (influenza, rhinopneumonia) ; bacterial diseases (that are generally due to commensal bacteria invading the lower respiratory tract because of an impairment of the pulmonaty defences); inflammatory processes (mainly in horses suffering from heaves and inflammatory airway disease) and exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhages. Dysfunction such as hypersecretion of mucus, bronchospasms, bronchial hypereactivity and oedema may complicate any of this diseases. Treatments focusing on the etiological agents (anti-viral therapy, modulation of immunity, and antibiotic therapy), on the associated symptoms (anti-inflammatory, bronchodilators, regulator of the muco-ciliary clearance) and on the nursing and general management (rest and environmental hygiene) are described in this review [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation de la condition sportive du cheval de complet sur le terrain
Van Erck, Emmanuelle; de Moffaerts, Brieuc; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Proceedings du Congrès Annuel A.V.E.F. (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMatrix metalloprotease in bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy and RAO horses in crisis and in remission.
Art, Tatiana ULg; Kirschvink, Nathalie; de Moffaerts, Brieuc et al

in 3rd World Equine Airways Symposium (WEAS) (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of oral antioxidant supplementation on blood antioxidant status in trained thoroughbred horses
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Veterinary Journal (2005), 169(1), 65-74

The oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium of trained thoroughbred horses (n = 40) was assessed on three occasions during a period of three months under field conditions by blood antioxidant markers analysis, i ... [more ▼]

The oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium of trained thoroughbred horses (n = 40) was assessed on three occasions during a period of three months under field conditions by blood antioxidant markers analysis, i.e. plasma ascorbic acid (AA), plasma antioxidant capacity of water-soluble components (ACW), whole blood (GSH) and oxidised (GSSG) glutathione, plasma alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene, plasma antioxidant capacity of lipid-soluble components (ACL), red blood cell superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-peroxidase activity (GPx) and plasma trace-elements, i.e. selenium (Se), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn). A control group of ten horses receiving a placebo and an antioxidant group of 30 horses orally supplemented with an antioxidant mixture were randomly formed. An antioxidant imbalance was observed after three months in the control group, reflected by a significant decrease in GSH, SOD, GPx, Se (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in GSSG (P < 0.05). The antioxidant supplement prevented GPx and Se decrease and significantly increased ACW, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and ACL (P < 0.05). Significant sex- or age-related differences were found for AA, ACW, alpha-tocopherol, SOD, GPx and Se, and there were significant correlations between ACW-AA, ACL-alpha-tocopherol, GPx-Se, CPK-Se, CPK-alpha-tocopherol and CPK-Cu. This field study has shown that trained thoroughbred horses undergo significant changes of several blood antioxidant markers and that oral antioxidant supplementation might partially counterbalance these changes by improving the hydrophilic, lipophilic and enzymatic antioxidant blood capacity. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of the oxidant-antioxidant blood balance in a field exercise test in Standardbred and eventing horses
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Kirschvink, Nathalie; van Erck, Emmanuelle et al

in Equine & Comparative Exercise Physiology (2005), 2(4), 253-261

The aim of this study was to determüie which oxidant-antioxidant blood markers are of interest for a field exercise test (ET) performed on a racetrack. Healthy Standardbred herses (S: n = 12) and healthy ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to determüie which oxidant-antioxidant blood markers are of interest for a field exercise test (ET) performed on a racetrack. Healthy Standardbred herses (S: n = 12) and healthy eventing horses (E: n = 12) were investigated. Exercice was monitored by measuring velocity (V), heart rate (HR), and plasma lactate (LA). Whilst maximal LA did sot Biffer (11.8 ± 0.88 mmoll-1), maximal V (S: 12.3 ± 0.17ms-1 versus E: 11.1 ±0.24ms-1, P < 0,05) and final HR (S: 222 ±1 versus E: 203 ± 8 beats min-1, P < 0.03) were significantly différent between groups. Venous was collected at rest (R) prior to ET and The following oxidant-antioxidant markers were detennitted: uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), alpha-tocopherol (Vit E). vitamin A (Vit A), superoxide cüsmutase (SOB), glutaYhione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (reduced: GSH and oxidized: GSS(r), glutathione redox ratio (GRR), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and sélénium (Se), uxidized proteins (Protox), lipid prrosides (Pool), antioxidant capacity of water-soluble comporteras (ACW) and antioxidant capacity of lipid-soluble components (ACW). The following markers were further determined 15 min (E15) after the ET:UA, ACW; AA, GSH, Proton, Pool, ACL. Standardbreds had significantly higher concentrations of ACW, GSH, ACL and Protox, whilst Se, Zn and SOI) were significantly lover than in eventing horses. Exercice induced a significant increase in ACW and UA. GSH decreaced in eventing horses and Pool significantly decreased in both horse groups. This study describes a field ET of high intensity for Standardbred and eventing horses, which could be performed by all animals tested. By sampling blond al rest and at E15, changes of thé hydrophilic antioxidant defence were partially assessed, whereas no interpretable changes of the lipophilic antioxidants and of oxidation markers (Protox, Pool) could be detected [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUpper airway function and dysfunction
Art, Tatiana ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in 9e Congrès de Médecine et Chirurgie Equine (2005)

The main airway function is the conduction of thé air from the amblent air to the gas exchange regions of the lung and conversely. Upper airway include nasal cavities, pharynx, larynx and extrathoracic ... [more ▼]

The main airway function is the conduction of thé air from the amblent air to the gas exchange regions of the lung and conversely. Upper airway include nasal cavities, pharynx, larynx and extrathoracic trachea. These structures, supported by bones, cartilages or muscles, must be as permeable as possible to the air. flow. If for structural or functional reasons, a permanent or dynamic narrowing occurs along the airway, the resulting bottleneck will increase the resistance to airflow, thus impair ventilation and generate abnormal respiratory noises, and finally decrease the exercise capacity. This paper focuses on the function and potential dysfunctions of the different parts of the upper airway in horses [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrévention des crises grâce à l’utilisation d’un concentré riche en fibres chez le cheval poussif
Bedoret, Denis; Art, Tatiana ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Proceedings: Congrès Annuel A.V.E.F. (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes causes d’intolérance à l’effort chez le cheval : résultats de deux études rétrospectives
van Ercke, Emmanuelle; Ponthier, Jérôme ULg; Couetil, Laurent et al

Conference (2004, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlutathione system deficiency in racehorses
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Kirschvink, N.; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Handbook of the 43rd Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 ULg)