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See detailThe evolution of the inorganic fluorine budget since the mid-1980s based on FTIR measurements at northern mid-latitudes
Duchatelet, Pierre ULg; Feng, Wuhu; Chipperfield, Martyn et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011)

Fluorine enters the stratosphere principally in the form of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons, mainly CFC-12 and CFC-11), HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons, mainly HCFC-22) and HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons, mainly HFC ... [more ▼]

Fluorine enters the stratosphere principally in the form of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons, mainly CFC-12 and CFC-11), HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons, mainly HCFC-22) and HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons, mainly HFC-134a) which have been (or are still) widely emitted at ground level by human activities. In the lower stratosphere, the photolysis of these halogenated source gases leads to the formation of the two fluorine reservoirs COClF and COF2. The subsequent photolysis of these two compounds frees F atoms, which principally react with CH4 and H2O to form the extremely stable HF gas, by far the dominant fluorine reservoir in the middle and upper stratosphere. Despite the fact that fluorine does not significantly contribute in stratospheric ozone depletion, measurements of the concentrations of individual F-containing species in different altitude ranges of the atmosphere are important as they reflect the amounts of anthropogenic gases transported into the middle atmosphere as well as their decomposition. Such measurements also provide insight into the partitioning between major fluorine source gases (which are potent greenhouse gases) and reservoirs and allows a global inventory of organic (CFy), inorganic (Fy) and total (FTOT) fluorine burdens to be monitored as a function of time. Indeed, regular updates of such inventories are important as the partitioning between F-containing gases in the stratosphere is continually evolving as emissions of anthropogenic gases from the surface change, principally as a consequence of the progressive ban on the production of CFCs and HCFCs adopted by the Montreal Protocol and its subsequent Amendments and Adjustments. To complement recent studies regarding fluorine species (Duchatelet et al., 2009, 2010, 2011; Mahieu et al., 2011), this communication presents the time series of the inorganic fluorine budget Fy over the last twenty-five years, based on HF and COF2 total column amounts derived from high resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra recorded at Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580m asl). A trend analysis of our HF, COF2 and Fy time series is performed and discussed in the context of past and current emissions of halogenated source gases. Comparisons with model and space data are also included. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent trends of inorganic chlorine and halogenated source gases above the Jungfraujoch and Kitt Peak stations derived from high-resolution FTIR solar observations
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Gardiner, Tom et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2010), 12(EGU2010-2420-3),

The longest series of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) high spectral resolution solar absorption observations are available from the Jungfraujoch and Kitt Peak stations, located at 46.5ºN and 30.9ºN ... [more ▼]

The longest series of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) high spectral resolution solar absorption observations are available from the Jungfraujoch and Kitt Peak stations, located at 46.5ºN and 30.9ºN, respectively. State-of-the-art interferometers are operated at these sites within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). These instruments allow to record spectra on a regular basis, under clear-sky conditions, using a suite of optical filters which altogether cover the 2 to 16 micron spectral range. Numerous absorption features characterized in the HITRAN compilations (e.g. Rothman et al., 2008) are encompassed in this mid-infrared region. Their analyses with either the SFIT-1 or SFIT-2 algorithm allow retrieving total columns of the target gases. Moreover, information on their distribution with altitude can generally be derived when using SFIT-2 which implements the Optimal Estimation Method of Rodgers (1990). Among the two dozen gases of atmospheric interest accessible to the ground-based FTIR technique, we have selected here a suite of long-lived halogenated species: HCl, ClONO2, CCl2F2, CCl3F, CHClF2, CCl4 and SF6. Time series available from the two sites will be presented, compared and critically discussed. In particular, changes in the abundances of theses gases since the peak in inorganic chlorine (Cly, which occurred in 1996-1997) and their intra-annual variability will be characterized with a statistical tool using bootstrap resampling (Gardiner et al., 2008). Trends and their associated uncertainties will be reported and put into perspective with the phase-out regulations of the production of ozone depleting substances adopted and implemented by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments. For instance, the trends affecting the reservoir species HCl, ClONO2, and their summation which is a good proxy of the total inorganic chlorine, have been calculated using all available daily mean measurements from January 1996 onwards. The following values were obtained for Jungfraujoch, when using 1996 as the reference year: -0.90±0.10%/yr for HCl, -0.92±0.26 %/yr for ClONO2, and -0.96±0.14 %/yr for Cly; in all cases, the uncertainties define the 95% confidence interval around the trend values. For Kitt Peak, the corresponding trends are: -0.55±0.34 %/yr for HCl, -1.27±0.84 %/yr for ClONO2 and -0.61±0.51 %/yr for Cly, they are statistically consistent with the Jungfraujoch rates of decrease. Further trend data will be presented at the EGU General Assembly while supplementary information on Jungfraujoch results will be available from communications at the same meeting by Duchatelet et al. (2010), Lejeune et al (2010) and Rinsland et al (2010). Comparisons with model data are also foreseen. [less ▲]

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See detailHydrogen fluoride total and partial column time series above the Jungfraujoch from long-term FTIR measurements: Impact of the line-shape model, characterization of the error budget and seasonal cycle, and comparison with satellite and model data
Duchatelet, Pierre ULg; Demoulin, Philippe ULg; Hase, Frank et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Atmospheres (2010), 115

Time series of hydrogen fluoride (HF) total columns have been derived from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra recorded between March 1984 and December 2009 at the International ... [more ▼]

Time series of hydrogen fluoride (HF) total columns have been derived from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra recorded between March 1984 and December 2009 at the International Scientific Station of the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580 m asl) with two high resolution spectrometers (one home-made and one Bruker 120-HR). Solar spectra have been inverted with the PROFFIT 9.5 algorithm, using the optimal estimation method. An inter-comparison of HF total columns retrieved with PROFFIT and SFIT-2 – the other reference algorithm in the FTIR community - is performed for the first time. The effect of a Galatry line shape model on HF retrieved total columns and vertical profiles, on the residuals of the fits and on the error budget is also quantified. Information content analysis indicates that, in addition to HF total vertical abundance, three independent stratospheric HF partial columns can be derived from our Bruker spectra. A complete error budget has been established and indicates that the main source of systematic error is linked to HF spectroscopy and that the random error affecting our HF total columns does not exceed 2.5%. Ground-based middle and upper stratospheric HF amounts have been compared to satellite data collected by the HALOE or ACE-FTS instruments. Comparisons of our FTIR HF total and partial columns with runs performed by two 3D numerical models (SLIMCAT and KASIMA) are also included. Finally, FTIR and model HF total and partial columns time series have been analyzed to derive the main characteristics of their seasonal cycles. [less ▲]

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See detailAn approach to retrieve information on the carbonyl fluoride (COF2) vertical distributions above Jungfraujoch by FTIR multi-spectrum multi-window fitting
Duchatelet, Pierre ULg; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Ruhnke, Roland et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2009), 9

We present an original multi-spectrum fitting procedure to retrieve volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles of carbonyl fluoride (COF2) from ground-based high resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar ... [more ▼]

We present an original multi-spectrum fitting procedure to retrieve volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles of carbonyl fluoride (COF2) from ground-based high resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar spectra. The multi-spectrum approach consists of simultaneously combining, during the retrievals, all spectra recorded consecutively during the same day and with the same resolution. Solar observations analyzed in this study with the SFIT-2 v3.91 fitting algorithm correspond to more than 2900 spectra recorded between January 2000 and December 2007 at high zenith angles, with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer operated at the high-altitude International Scientific Station of the Jungfraujoch (ISSJ, 46.5° N latitude, 8.0° E longitude, 3580 m altitude), Switzerland. The goal of the retrieval strategy described here is to provide information about the vertical distribution of carbonyl fluoride. The microwindows used are located in the ν4 or in the ν4 COF2 infrared (IR) absorption bands. Averaging kernel and eigenvector analysis indicates that our FTIR retrieval is sensitive to COF2 inversion between 17 and 30 km, with the major contribution to the retrieved information always coming from the measurement. Moreover, there was no significant bias between COF2 partial columns, total columns or VMR profiles retrieved from the two bands. For each wavenumber region, a complete error budget including all identified sources has been carefully established. In addition, comparisons of FTIR COF2 17–30 km partial columns with KASIMA and SLIMCAT 3-D CTMs are also presented. If we do not notice any significant bias between FTIR and SLIMCAT time series, KASIMA COF2 17–30 km partial columns are lower of around 25%, probably due to incorrect lower boundary conditions. For each times series, linear trend estimation for the 2000–2007 time period as well as a seasonal variation study are also performed and critically discussed. For FTIR and KASIMA time series, very low COF2 growth rates (0.4±0.2%/year and 0.3±0.2%/year, respectively) have been derived. However, the SLIMCAT data set gives a slight negative trend (−0.5±0.2%/year), probably ascribable to discontinuities in the meteorological data used by this model. We further demonstrate that all time series are able to reproduce the COF2 seasonal cycle, which main seasonal characteristics deduced from each data set agree quite well. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of HNO3, ClONO2, and N2O5 from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS)
Wolff, Mareile; Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Strong, Kimberley et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2008), 8(13), 3529-3562

The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite was launched on 12 August 2003. Its two instruments measure vertical profiles of over 30 atmospheric trace gases by analyzing solar occultation spectra ... [more ▼]

The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite was launched on 12 August 2003. Its two instruments measure vertical profiles of over 30 atmospheric trace gases by analyzing solar occultation spectra in the ultraviolet/visible and infrared wavelength regions. The reservoir gases HNO3, ClONO2, and N2O5 are three of the key species provided by the primary instrument, the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). This paper describes the ACE-FTS version 2.2 data products, including the N2O5 update, for the three species and presents validation comparisons with available observations. We have compared volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles of HNO3, ClONO2, and N2O5 with measurements by other satellite instruments (SMR, MLS, MIPAS), aircraft measurements (ASUR), and single balloon-flights (SPIRALE, FIRS-2). Partial columns of HNO3 and ClONO2 were also compared with measurements by ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometers. Overall the quality of the ACE-FTS v2.2 HNO3 VMR profiles is good from 18 to 35 km. For the statistical satellite comparisons, the mean absolute differences are generally within ±1 ppbv ±20%) from 18 to 35 km. For MIPAS and MLS comparisons only, mean relative differences lie within±10% between 10 and 36 km. ACE-FTS HNO3 partial columns (~15–30 km) show a slight negative bias of −1.3% relative to the ground-based FTIRs at latitudes ranging from 77.8° S–76.5° N. Good agreement between ACE-FTS ClONO2 and MIPAS, using the Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung and Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IMK-IAA) data processor is seen. Mean absolute differences are typically within ±0.01 ppbv between 16 and 27 km and less than +0.09 ppbv between 27 and 34 km. The ClONO2 partial column comparisons show varying degrees of agreement, depending on the location and the quality of the FTIR measurements. Good agreement was found for the comparisons with the midlatitude Jungfraujoch partial columns for which the mean relative difference is 4.7%. ACE-FTS N2O5 has a low bias relative to MIPAS IMK-IAA, reaching −0.25 ppbv at the altitude of the N2O5 maximum (around 30 km). Mean absolute differences at lower altitudes (16–27 km) are typically −0.05 ppbv for MIPAS nighttime and ±0.02 ppbv for MIPAS daytime measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasured and modeled trends of stratospheric Cly and Fy column amounts in the northern hemisphere
Ruhnke, Roland; Blumenstock, Thomas; Borsdorff, Tobias et al

Poster (2008, July)

The german HGF virtual institute PEP (Pole-Equator-Pole) has been established in 2004 in order to investigate the variability of atmospheric trace constituents along a north-south transection. Within PEP ... [more ▼]

The german HGF virtual institute PEP (Pole-Equator-Pole) has been established in 2004 in order to investigate the variability of atmospheric trace constituents along a north-south transection. Within PEP the HGF centres AWI and FZK as well as the german Universities of Bremen, Karlsruhe and Potsdam combine their knowledge and capabilities in ground-based measurements and global and regional modelling of atmospheric trace constituents and aerosols. Here we present results of long-term measurements of the stratospheric column of HCl, ClONO2, HF, and O3 obtained at the different PEP stations in the northern hemisphere and in addtion at Jungfraujoch. All stations are affiliated to the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). The measured time series are compared with long-term model calculations performed with a state of the art 2-D model of the University of Bremen and the 3-D CTM KASIMA. Please note, that the lowest altitude for the determination of the total columns is about 7 km leading to a slight underestimation w.r.t. the measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbonyl fluoride (COF2) vertical information above Jungfraujoch by FTIR and multi-spectra fitting: error budget and comparisons with KASIMA 3-D CTM model calculations
Duchatelet, Pierre ULg; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Ruhnke, Roland et al

Poster (2008, April)

The major sources of fluorine in the stratosphere are CFC-11 and CFC-12. During the decomposition process, fluorine is first present in the form of carbonyl compounds (e.g. carbonyl fluoride (COF2 ... [more ▼]

The major sources of fluorine in the stratosphere are CFC-11 and CFC-12. During the decomposition process, fluorine is first present in the form of carbonyl compounds (e.g. carbonyl fluoride (COF2)). Given its long life time, COF2 is the second most abundant stratospheric fluorine reservoir. Earliest, COF2 vertical distributions were derived from occultation measurements performed by the ATMOS instrument during the SPACELAB-3 Space Shuttle mission in 1985. The Canadian FTIR spectrometer ACE-FTS, onboard the SCISAT-1 satellite, is the first instrument since the last ATMOS flight in 1994, to record COF2 vertical profiles from space. Four years of ACE-FTS occultation measurements are presently available. Several COF2 IR absorption lines located either in the so-called InSb (1-5 µm) and MCT (2-16 µm) spectral ranges can be used to determine its total column from ground-based high-resolution FTIR observations. In addition, we have proposed, during the EGU General Assembly 2007, an original retrieval procedure that allows us to derive information on the COF2 vertical distribution, between 17 and 30 km, from ground-based FTIR spectra recorded at Jungfraujoch. This “multi-microwindows multi-spectra” approach, using the SFIT-2 v3.91 algorithm, has been completely characterized in terms of fitting strategy and information content. Some examples of COF2 vertical profiles inversions were also presented. This year, we will complete the characterization of the multi-microwindows multi-spectra fitting procedure by exposing the full error budget affecting our COF2 partial and total columns products. Also, comparisons with COF2 model runs generated by the 3D CTM KASIMA (KArlsruhe SImulation model of the Middle Atmosphere) will be presented and critically discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasured and modelled trends of stratopsheric Cly and Fy column amounts in the northern hemisphere
Ruhnke, Roland; Blumenstock, Thomas; Duchatelet, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2007, April)

Reactive inorganic chlorine plays a crucial role in the stratospheric ozone depletion. To stabilize and enable a recovering of the stratospheric ozone layer, the Montreal protocol and its amendments and ... [more ▼]

Reactive inorganic chlorine plays a crucial role in the stratospheric ozone depletion. To stabilize and enable a recovering of the stratospheric ozone layer, the Montreal protocol and its amendments and adjustments have been progressively implemented to reduce or even stop the production and emission of important chlorinated source gases (CFCs, HCFCs, CCl4, CH3CCl3, and Halons). As these source gases are photolysed in the stratosphere into inorganic chlorine and fluorine, respectively, the turn over of the inorganic chlorine (HCl and ClONO2) and slowing down of fluorine (HF and COF2) reservoirs act as a verification of the effectiveness of these protocols. Here we present results of long-term measurements of the stratospheric column of HCl, ClONO2, and HF obtained at different stations in the northern hemisphere (Ny Alesund, Kiruna, Zugspitze, Jungfraujoch, Izana, all affiliated to the NDACC, Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) within the PEP (Pole- Equator-Pole) network. These time series are interpreted with model calculations performed with a state of the art 2-D model and the 3-D CTM KASIMA with respect to the determination of the slowing down or turn over, respectively. In addition, trend parameters calculated using different approaches (e.g. linear trend, bootstrap-method) will be presented and intercompared. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of MIPAS ClONO2 measurements
Hopfner, Michael; von Clarmann, Thomas; Fischer, H. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2007), 7

Altitude profiles of ClONO2 retrieved with the IMK (Institut fur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung) science-oriented data processor from MIPAS/Envisat (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric ... [more ▼]

Altitude profiles of ClONO2 retrieved with the IMK (Institut fur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung) science-oriented data processor from MIPAS/Envisat (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding on Envisat) mid-infrared limb emission measurements between July 2002 and March 2004 have been validated by comparison with balloon-borne (Mark IV, FIRS2, MIPAS-B), airborne (MIPAS-STR), ground-based (Spitsbergen, Thule, Kiruna, Harestua, Jungfraujoch, Izana, Wollongong, Lauder), and spaceborne (ACE-FTS) observations. With few exceptions we found very good agreement between these instruments and MIPAS with no evidence for any bias in most cases and altitude regions. For balloon-borne measurements typical absolute mean differences are below 0.05 ppbv over the whole altitude range from 10 to 39 km. In case of ACE-FTS observations mean differences are below 0.03 ppbv for observations below 26 km. Above this altitude the comparison with ACE-FTS is affected by the photochemically induced diurnal variation of ClONO2. Correction for this by use of a chemical transport model led to an overcompensation of the photochemical effect by up to 0.1 ppbv at altitudes of 30-35 km in case of MIPAS-ACE-FTS comparisons while for the balloon-borne observations no such inconsistency has been detected. The comparison of MIPAS derived total column amounts with ground-based observations revealed no significant bias in the MIPAS data. Mean differences between MIPAS and FTIR column abundances are 0.11 +/- 0.12 x 10(14) cm(-2) (1.0 +/- 1.1%) and -0.09 +/- 0.19 x 10(14) cm(-2) (-0.8 +/- 1.7%), depending on the coincidence criterion applied. chi(2) tests have been performed to assess the combined precision estimates of MIPAS and the related instruments. When no exact coincidences were available as in case of MIPAS-FTIR or MIPAS-ACE-FTS comparisons it has been necessary to take into consideration a coincidence error term to account for chi(2) deviations. From the resulting chi(2) profiles there is no evidence for a systematic over/underestimation of the MIPAS random error analysis. [less ▲]

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