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See detailAn Earth-like correspondence between Saturn's auroral features and radio emission
Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Clarke, John T. et al

in Nature (2005), 433(7027), 722-725

Saturn is a source of intense kilometre-wavelength radio emissions that are believed to be associated with its polar aurorae(1,2), and which provide an important remote diagnostic of its magnetospheric ... [more ▼]

Saturn is a source of intense kilometre-wavelength radio emissions that are believed to be associated with its polar aurorae(1,2), and which provide an important remote diagnostic of its magnetospheric activity. Previous observations implied that the radio emission originated in the polar regions, and indicated a strong correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure(1,3-7). The radio source also appeared to be fixed near local noon and at the latitude of the ultraviolet aurora(1,2). There have, however, been no observations relating the radio emissions to detailed auroral structures. Here we report measurements of the radio emissions, which, along with high-resolution images of Saturn's ultraviolet auroral emissions(8), suggest that although there are differences in the global morphology of the aurorae, Saturn's radio emissions exhibit an Earth-like correspondence between bright auroral features and the radio emissions. This demonstrates the universality of the mechanism that results in emissions near the electron cyclotron frequency narrowly beamed at large angles to the magnetic field(9,10). [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral Lyman alpha and H2 bands from the giant planets. 2: Effect of the anisotropy of the precipitating particles on the interpretation of the 'color ratio'
Prange, Renee; Rego, Daniel; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1995), 100

Previous spectral analyses have given evidence of collisionally excited Jovian and (at times) Saturnian H2 Werner bands being absorbed by hydrocarbons at the shortest wavelengths along the auroral ovals ... [more ▼]

Previous spectral analyses have given evidence of collisionally excited Jovian and (at times) Saturnian H2 Werner bands being absorbed by hydrocarbons at the shortest wavelengths along the auroral ovals, and of a longitudinal dependence of this absorption in the Jovian aurorae. This 'color ratio' has been used to estimate the energy of the primary particles. In such estimates, particles are generally assumed to penetrate vertically into the atmosphere. However, the precipitating particle angular distribution is unknown, and a model developed for a diffuse aurora by Prange and Elkhamsi (1991), for instance, predicts quite different possible distributions. We consider here the influence of the angular distribution used in the model, and show that distributions peaking far from vertical may increase the energy derived from a given color ratio by as much as a factor of 3. We discuss previous interpretations of the color ratio longitudinal modulation (variation of the auroral atmosphere structure, or of the incident particle energy) in view of the subsequent increase in energy input. We argue that an interpretation in terms of energy variations only is not consistent with the energy available in the magnetosphere if the aurorae are diffuse, and we discuss this finding in the context of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. [less ▲]

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See detailHST Far-Ultraviolet Imaging of Jupiter During the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9
Clarke, John T; Prange, Renee; Ballester, Gilda E et al

in Science (1995), 267

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended ... [more ▼]

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended than at longer wavelengths, which indicates that ultraviolet-absorbing gases or aerosols are more extended, more absorbing, and at higher altitudes than the absorbers of visible light. Transient auroral emissions were observed near the magnetic conjugate point of the K impact site just after that impact. The global auroral activity was fainter than average during the impacts, and a variable auroral emission feature was observed inside the southern auroral oval preceding the impacts of fragments Q1 and Q2. [less ▲]

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See detailThe morphology of the north Jovian ultraviolet aurora observed with the Hubble Space Telescope
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Dols, Vincent; Prange, Renee et al

in Planetary and Space Science (1994), 42

A series of six images covering a complete rotation of the north polar region of Jupiter were obtained in February 1993 with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These images ... [more ▼]

A series of six images covering a complete rotation of the north polar region of Jupiter were obtained in February 1993 with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These images provide the first global picture of the morphology of the Jovian ultraviolet aurora observed from Earth orbit. The camera passband was centered near 153 nm, a region dominated by the H2 Lyman bands and continuum. The successive exposures, taken approximately 90 min apart, are used to construct a polar view of the auroral zone. It is found that the auroral emissions do not exactly follow the footprint of a constant L-shell although the size of the oval and its location agree best with the footprints of the approximately equal to 30 R[SUB]J[/SUB] field line in the GSFC O6 model of the Jovian magnetic field. The displacement between the observed auroral zone and the theoretical oval may indicate a possible distortion of the Jovian magnetic field lines near the surface. A comparison with two images at the same wavelength obtained 8 months earlier shows that the main morphological features are persistent, in spite of changes in the detailed emission distribution. Small scale features with characteristic sizes of approximately 1000 km are observed along the auroral oval. The change of morphology observed as a function of the System 3 longitude appears as a persistent characteristic of the morphology of the north polar aurora. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral Lyman alpha and H2 bands from the giant planets: 1. Excitation by proton precipitation in the Jovian atmosphere
Rego, Daniel; Prange, Renee; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1994), 99

This paper is part of a work aimed at modeling the ratio of the observed Jovian auroral intensity at H Lyman-alpha and in the H2 Lyman and Werner bands and interpreting them as diagnostic of the incident ... [more ▼]

This paper is part of a work aimed at modeling the ratio of the observed Jovian auroral intensity at H Lyman-alpha and in the H2 Lyman and Werner bands and interpreting them as diagnostic of the incident magnetospheric particle species and energy. The work is planned in three steps: (1) modeling of the volume excitation rate, (2) modeling of the radiative transfer at Lyman-alpha, (3) application to existing observational data and new data obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope. The present paper deals with the first step. Models of the volume excitation rate have previously been developed for low energy electrons and oxygen ions. However, the energy range of the study has to be extended towards higher energy in view of recent results on the penetration depth of the primary particles. Protons have not been modeled so far. We have used an existing electron code of degradation of energy (Gerard and Singh, 1982) which has been improved, updated and adapted to the case of precipitating protons. The issues of nonequilibrium beam H/H(+) fractions and of getting reliable cross sections over a wide energy range have been considered with particular care. The altitude distribution of the volume excitation rate is compared for electrons and protons, for various initial energies in the range 10-50 keV and 50 keV to 1 MeV, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailHubble Space Telescope Goddard high-resolution spectrograph H2 rotational spectra of Jupiter's aurora
Clarke, John T; Ben Jaffel, Lotfi; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred et al

in Astrophysical Journal (1994), 430

We have observed the emission spectrum from Jupiter's north auroral atmosphere with 0.57 A spectral resolution over 1204-1241 A. Bright emissions have been detected from 50 deg to 60 deg latitude at ... [more ▼]

We have observed the emission spectrum from Jupiter's north auroral atmosphere with 0.57 A spectral resolution over 1204-1241 A. Bright emissions have been detected from 50 deg to 60 deg latitude at locations consistent with 6 to 30 R [SUB]J[/SUB] auroral ovals, with much fainter emissions away form the auroral ovals. The emission spectrum is well fitted by both laboratory spectra and theoretical models of optically thin electron excited H2, with added Doppler-broadened Lyman Alpha emission. The observed Lyman Alpha emission wings extend more than 1 A from line center and appear correlated in strength with the H2 brightness. Individual rotational lines in the H2 Werner band system are resolved, allowing a determination of the H2 rotational temperature at the altitude of the emission. We derive best-fit temperatures from 400-450 to 700-750 K, with the auroral emission layer temperature changing either across the auroral oval or over several days' time. These observations demonstrate for the first time the ability to measure the observed rapid H2 temperature variations across Jupiter's auroral atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphology and time variation of the Jovian Far UV aurora: Hubble Space Telescope observations
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Dols, Vincent; Paresce, Francesco et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1993), 98

High spatial resolution images of the north polar region of Jupiter have been obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The first set of two images collected ... [more ▼]

High spatial resolution images of the north polar region of Jupiter have been obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The first set of two images collected 87 min apart in February 1992 shows a bright (approximately or equal to 180 kR) emission superimposed on the background in rotation with the planet. Both Ly alpha images show common regions of enhanced emission but differences are also observed, possibly due to temporal variations. The second group of images obtained on June 23 and 26, 1992 isolates a spectral region near 153 nm dominated by the H2 Lyman bands and continuum. Both pictures exhibit a narrow arc structure fitting the L = 30 magnetotail field line footprint in the morning sector and a broader diffuse aurora in the afternoon. They show no indication of an evening twilight enhancement. Although the central meridian longitudes were similar, significant differences are seen in the two exposures, especially in the region of diffuse emission, and interpreted as signatures of temporal variations. The total power radiated in the H2 bands is approximately or equal to 2 x 10[SUP]12[/SUP] W, in agreement with previous UV spectrometer observations. The high local H2 emission rates (approximately 450 kR) imply a particle precipitation carrying an energy flux of about 5 x 10[SUP]-2[/SUP] W/sq m. [less ▲]

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