References of "Luyten, F. P"
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See detailMechanisms of ectopic bone formation by human osteoprogenitor cells on CaP biomaterial carriers.
Chai, Y. C.; Roberts, S. J.; Desmet, E. et al

in Biomaterials (2012)

Stem cell-based strategies for bone regeneration, which use calcium phosphate (CaP)-based biomaterials in combination with developmentally relevant progenitor populations, have significant potential for ... [more ▼]

Stem cell-based strategies for bone regeneration, which use calcium phosphate (CaP)-based biomaterials in combination with developmentally relevant progenitor populations, have significant potential for clinical repair of skeletal defects. However, the exact mechanism of action and the stem cell-host-material interactions are still poorly understood. We studied if pre-conditioning of human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs) in vitro could enhance, in combination with a CaP-based biomaterial carrier, ectopic bone formation in vivo. By culturing hPDCs in a biomimetic calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (P(i)) enriched culture conditions, we observed an enhanced cell proliferation, decreased expression of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers and upregulation of osteogenic genes including osterix, Runx2, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and BMP-2. However, the in vitro pre-conditioning protocols were non-predictive for in vivo ectopic bone formation. Surprisingly, culturing in the presence of Ca(2+) and P(i) supplements resulted in partial or complete abrogation of in vivo ectopic bone formation. Through histological, immunohistochemical and microfocus X-ray computed tomography (muCT) analysis of the explants, we found that in situ proliferation, collagen matrix deposition and the mediation of osteoclastic activity by hPDCs are associated to their ectopic bone forming capacity. These data were validated by the multivariate analysis and partial least square regression modelling confirming the non-predictability of in vitro parameters on in vivo ectopic bone formation. Our series of experiments provided further insights on the stem cell-host-material interactions that govern in vivo ectopic bone induction driven by hPDCs on CaP-based biomaterials. [less ▲]

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See detailCurrent views on calcium phosphate osteogenicity and the translation into effective bone regeneration strategies.
Chai, Y. C.; Carlier, Aurélie ULg; Bolander, J. et al

in Acta Biomaterialia (2012), 8(11), 3876-87

Calcium phosphate (CaP) has traditionally been used for the repair of bone defects because of its strong resemblance to the inorganic phase of bone matrix. Nowadays, a variety of natural or synthetic CaP ... [more ▼]

Calcium phosphate (CaP) has traditionally been used for the repair of bone defects because of its strong resemblance to the inorganic phase of bone matrix. Nowadays, a variety of natural or synthetic CaP-based biomaterials are produced and have been extensively used for dental and orthopaedic applications. This is justified by their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity (i.e. the intrinsic material property that initiates de novo bone formation), which are attributed to the chemical composition, surface topography, macro/microporosity and the dissolution kinetics. However, the exact molecular mechanism of action is unknown. This review paper first summarizes the most important aspects of bone biology in relation to CaP and the mechanisms of bone matrix mineralization. This is followed by the research findings on the effects of calcium (Ca(2)(+)) and phosphate (PO(4)(3)(-)) ions on the migration, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts during in vivo bone formation and in vitro culture conditions. Further, the rationale of using CaP for bone regeneration is explained, focusing thereby specifically on the material's osteoinductive properties. Examples of different material forms and production techniques are given, with the emphasis on the state-of-the art in fine-tuning the physicochemical properties of CaP-based biomaterials for improved bone induction and the use of CaP as a delivery system for bone morphogenetic proteins. The use of computational models to simulate the CaP-driven osteogenesis is introduced as part of a bone tissue engineering strategy in order to facilitate the understanding of cell-material interactions and to gain further insight into the design and optimization of CaP-based bone reparative units. Finally, limitations and possible solutions related to current experimental and computational techniques are discussed. [less ▲]

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