References of "Kurth, William S"
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See detailCassini UVIS observations of Jupiter's auroral variability
Pryor, Wayne R.; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Esposito, Larry W. et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2005), 178(2), 312-326

The Cassini spacecraft Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained observations of Jupiter's auroral emissions in H-2 band systems and H Lyman-alpha from day 275 of 2000 (October 1), to day 81 of ... [more ▼]

The Cassini spacecraft Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained observations of Jupiter's auroral emissions in H-2 band systems and H Lyman-alpha from day 275 of 2000 (October 1), to day 81 of 2001 (March 22). Much of the globally integrated auroral variability measured with UVIS can be explained simply in terms of the rotation of Jupiter's main auroral arcs with the planet. These arcs were also imaged by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on Hubble Space Telescope (HST). However, several brightening events were seen by UVIS in which the global auroral output increased by a factor of 2-4. These events persisted over a number of hours and in one case can clearly be tied to a large solar coronal mass ejection event. The auroral UV emissions from these bursts also correspond to hectometric radio emission (0.5-16 MHz) increases reported by the Galileo Plasma Wave Spectrometer (PWS) and Cassim Radio and Plasma Wave Spectrometer (RPWS) experiments. In general, the hectometric radio data vary differently with longitude than the UV data because of radio wave beaming effects. The 2 largest events in the UVIS data were on 2000 day 280 (October 6) and on 2000 days 325-326 (November 20-21). The global brightening events on November 20-21 are compared with corresponding data on the interplanetary magnetic field, solar wind conditions, and energetic particle environment. ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) solar wind data was numerically propagated from the Earth to Jupiter with an MHD code and compared to the observed event. A second class of brief auroral brightening events seen in HST (and probably UVIS) data that last for similar to 2 min is associated with aurora] flares inside the main auroral ovals. On January 8, 2001, from 18:45-19:35 UT UVIS H-2 band emissions from the north polar region varied quasiperiodically. The varying emissions, probably due to amoral flares inside the main auroral oval, are correlated with low-frequency quasiperiodic radio bursts in the 0.6-5 kHz Galileo PWS data. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Earth-like correspondence between Saturn's auroral features and radio emission
Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Clarke, John T. et al

in Nature (2005), 433(7027), 722-725

Saturn is a source of intense kilometre-wavelength radio emissions that are believed to be associated with its polar aurorae(1,2), and which provide an important remote diagnostic of its magnetospheric ... [more ▼]

Saturn is a source of intense kilometre-wavelength radio emissions that are believed to be associated with its polar aurorae(1,2), and which provide an important remote diagnostic of its magnetospheric activity. Previous observations implied that the radio emission originated in the polar regions, and indicated a strong correlation with solar wind dynamic pressure(1,3-7). The radio source also appeared to be fixed near local noon and at the latitude of the ultraviolet aurora(1,2). There have, however, been no observations relating the radio emissions to detailed auroral structures. Here we report measurements of the radio emissions, which, along with high-resolution images of Saturn's ultraviolet auroral emissions(8), suggest that although there are differences in the global morphology of the aurorae, Saturn's radio emissions exhibit an Earth-like correspondence between bright auroral features and the radio emissions. This demonstrates the universality of the mechanism that results in emissions near the electron cyclotron frequency narrowly beamed at large angles to the magnetic field(9,10). [less ▲]

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See detailSolar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae
Crary, Frank J.; Clarke, John T.; Dougherty, Michele K. et al

in Nature (2005), 433(7027), 720-722

The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms(1), but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer ... [more ▼]

The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms(1), but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system(2), whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging(3) we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere. [less ▲]

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