References of "Kurth, William"
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See detailCassini UVIS Saturn Auroral Images from the 2013 HST/Cassini Campaign
Pryor, Wayne; Jouchoux, Alain; Esposito, Larry et al

Conference (2013, October)

In 2013 coordinated observations of Saturn by the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were obtained. During these observations the Cassini spacecraft provided a high-latitude view of ... [more ▼]

In 2013 coordinated observations of Saturn by the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were obtained. During these observations the Cassini spacecraft provided a high-latitude view of Saturn's auroras. Intense auroras were observed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) from close range (about 5 Saturn radii away). A 6-frame UVIS movie has been constructed from some of the observations from May 20- 21, 2013 showing the evolution of two bright auroral features. We report on the UVIS images, the corresponding spectra, and compare the UVIS data to HST images and data from other Cassini instruments. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse of Jupiter's and Saturn's auroral activity to the solar wind
Clarke, J. T.; Nichols, J.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2009), 114

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, there is considerable evidence that auroral emissions on Jupiter and ... [more ▼]

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, there is considerable evidence that auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are driven primarily by internal processes, with the main energy source being the planets' rapid rotation. Prior observations have suggested there might be some influence of the solar wind on Jupiter's aurorae and indicated that auroral storms on Saturn can occur at times of solar wind pressure increases. To investigate in detail the dependence of auroral processes on solar wind conditions, a large campaign of observations of these planets has been undertaken using the Hubble Space Telescope, in association with measurements from planetary spacecraft and solar wind conditions both propagated from 1 AU and measured near each planet. The data indicate a brightening of both the auroral emissions and Saturn kilometric radiation at Saturn close in time to the arrival of solar wind shocks and pressure increases, consistent with a direct physical relationship between Saturnian auroral processes and solar wind conditions. At Jupiter the correlation is less strong, with increases in total auroral power seen near the arrival of solar wind forward shocks but little increase observed near reverse shocks. In addition, auroral dawn storms have been observed when there was little change in solar wind conditions. The data are consistent with some solar wind influence on some Jovian auroral processes, while the auroral activity also varies independently of the solar wind. This extensive data set will serve to constrain theoretical models for the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Degree of Correlation of Jovian and Saturnian Auroral Emissions With Solar Wind Conditions
Clarke, J. T.; Nichols, J.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are thought to be driven ... [more ▼]

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are thought to be driven primarily by internal processes, with the main energy source being the planets' rapid rotation. Limited evidence has suggested there might be some influence of the solar wind on Jupiter's aurorae, and indicated that auroral storms on Saturn can occur at times of solar wind pressure increases. To investigate in detail the dependence of auroral processes on solar wind conditions, a large campaign of observations of these planets has been undertaken using the Hubble Space Telescope, in association with measurements from planetary spacecraft and solar wind conditions both propagated from one AU and measured near each planet. The data indicate a consistent brightening of both the auroral emissions and Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) at Saturn close in time to the arrival of solar wind shocks and pressure increases, consistent with a direct physical relationship between Saturnian auroral processes and solar wind conditions. This correlation has been strengthened by the final campaign observations in Feb. 2008. At Jupiter the situation is less clear, with increases in total auroral power seen near the arrival of solar wind forward shocks, while little increase has been observed near reverse shocks. In addition, auroral dawn storms have been observed when there was little change in solar wind conditions. The data are consistent with some solar wind influence on some Jovian auroral processes, while the auroral activity also varies independently of the solar wind. This extensive data set will serve to constrain theoretical models for the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailCoordinated measurements of auroral processes at Saturn from the Cassini spacecraft and HST
Mitchell, D. G.; Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, G. B. et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

One of the primary Cassini mission objectives at Saturn is to characterize Saturn's aurora-its spatial morphology, associated particle energization, radio wave generation, and magnetospheric currents ... [more ▼]

One of the primary Cassini mission objectives at Saturn is to characterize Saturn's aurora-its spatial morphology, associated particle energization, radio wave generation, and magnetospheric currents, relationship with solar wind pressure and magnetic field, and its large scale mapping to the magnetosphere. By design, the Cassini orbital tour included high inclination and low periapsis orbits late in the prime mission specifically to address many of these topics. In this presentation, we will provide a snapshot of the current state of our investigation into the relationship between magnetospheric measurements of particles and fields, and the aurora. For in situ data, we will show measurements of upward traveling light ion conics (~30 keV to 200 keV), often accompanied by electron beams (<20 keV to ~1 MeV) and enhanced broadband noise (10 Hz to a few kHz), throughout the outer magnetosphere on field lines that nominally map from well into the polar cap (dipole L > 50) to well into the closed field region (dipole L < 10). Sometimes the particle phenomena and the broadband noise occur in pulses of roughly five-minute duration, separated by tens of minutes. At other times they are relatively steady over an hour or more. Magnetic signatures associated with some of the pulsed events are consistent with field aligned current structures. Correlative observations of solar wind (Cassini) and aurora (HST) have established a strong relationship between solar wind pressure and auroral activity (brightness) (Crary et al., Nature, 2005; Clarke et al., JGR, 2008). A similar correspondence between bright auroral arcs and ring current ion acceleration will be shown here. So while some auroral forms seem to be associated with the open/closed field boundary (i.e. in the cusp-Bunce et al., JGR, 2008), we also demonstrate that under some magnetospheric conditions for which protons and oxygen ions are accelerated once per Saturn magnetosphere rotation at a preferred local time between midnight and dawn, simultaneous auroral observations by the HST reveal a close correlation between these dynamical magnetospheric events and dawn-side transient auroral brightenings. Likewise, many of the recurrent energetic neutral atom enhancements coincide closely with bursts of Saturn kilometric radiation, again suggesting a linkage with high latitude auroral processes. Finally, we will show some intriguing results of auroral movie sequences from the Cassini UVIS instrument with corresponding ring current movies from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument Ion and Neutral Camera (MIMI/INCA). [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn's auroral morphology and activity during quiet magnetospheric conditions
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Cowley, S. W. H. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2006), 111

We report the results of a coordinated Hubble Space Telescope-Cassini campaign that took place between 26 October and 2 November 2005. During this period, Saturn's magnetosphere was in an expanded state ... [more ▼]

We report the results of a coordinated Hubble Space Telescope-Cassini campaign that took place between 26 October and 2 November 2005. During this period, Saturn's magnetosphere was in an expanded state and the solar wind was quiet, as indicated by the location of the magnetopause, in situ particle measurements, weak auroral SKR emission, and the generally low brightness of the aurora. We describe the morphology and dynamics of the aurora during this period in parallel with concurrent Cassini measurements. We show that the aurora exhibits considerable longitudinal structure and time variations over intervals of a few hours, in spite of the absence of observable external triggers and generally low intensity. In particular, enhancements of the dawn-morning oval are seen while no apparent indication of solar wind activity is observed. These features rotate at a speed corresponding to about 65% of the planet's angular velocity. We also describe energetic neutral atom measurements indicating that an ENA acceleration event occurred in the magnetotail on 26 October without any measured signature of solar wind activation. These observations suggest an intrinsically dynamical magnetosphere where injection of hot plasma occasionally takes place in the night or dawn sector during quiet magnetospheric conditions, possibly connected with either the Dungey or the Vasyliunas convection cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailObservations of Saturn's Atmosphere and Auroras by Cassini UVIS and VIMS
Pryor, W. R.; Baines, K.; West, R. et al

Conference (2005, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed a year of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed a year of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to build up spectral images of Saturn, with sufficient spatial resolution to reveal Saturn's auroral oval. Saturn images include evidence for rapid auroral variations and polar UV-dark regions mostly inside the auroral ovals. Absorption bands of acetylene are clearly seen in the reflected sunlight spectrum. The auroral emission spectrum is similar to that of Jupiter, showing H2 band emission and H Lyman-alpha emission. Saturn's auroral, dayglow, and nightglow spectra show significant differences. Saturn's aurora is observed to vary in brightness by at least a factor of four. The brightest auroral emissions seen so far occurred after 2004 day 207 19:30 when Cassini CAPS and MAG recorded passage of a solar wind shock. The enhanced auroral brightness persisted for days, and is seen at both poles of Saturn. Cassini RPWS observed enhanced auroral kilometric emissions during several auroral brightening events seen by UVIS. A campaign of Hubble Space Telescope UV imaging with ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys) of Saturn's dayside southern auroral zone took place on 2005 February 17. Cassini UVIS and VIMS observed Saturn's nightside northern aurora during this period. The UVIS long slit was aligned with lines of latitude on Saturn, providing information about intensity and spectral variations along the auroral oval. Cassini VIMS has now obtained an initial image and spectrum of Saturn's H3}+ auroral emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphological differences between Saturn's ultraviolet aurorae and those of Earth and Jupiter
Clarke, J. T.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Nature (2005), 433(7027), 717-719

It has often been stated that Saturn's magnetosphere and aurorae are intermediate between those of Earth, where the dominant processes are solar wind driven(1), and those of Jupiter, where processes are ... [more ▼]

It has often been stated that Saturn's magnetosphere and aurorae are intermediate between those of Earth, where the dominant processes are solar wind driven(1), and those of Jupiter, where processes are driven by a large source of internal plasma(2-4). But this view is based on information about Saturn that is far inferior to what is now available. Here we report ultraviolet images of Saturn, which, when combined with simultaneous Cassini measurements of the solar wind(5) and Saturn kilometric radio emission(6), demonstrate that its aurorae differ morphologically from those of both Earth and Jupiter. Saturn's auroral emissions vary slowly; some features appear in partial corotation whereas others are fixed to the solar wind direction; the auroral oval shifts quickly in latitude; and the aurora is often not centred on the magnetic pole nor closed on itself. In response to a large increase in solar wind dynamic pressure(5) Saturn's aurora brightened dramatically, the brightest auroral emissions moved to higher latitudes, and the dawn side polar regions were filled with intense emissions. The brightening is reminiscent of terrestrial aurorae, but the other two variations are not. Rather than being intermediate between the Earth and Jupiter, Saturn's auroral emissions behave fundamentally differently from those at the other planets. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn's UV Aurora Imaged with HST during the Cassini Approach to Saturn
Clarke, J. T.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Poster (2004, December 13)

A series of HST STIS UV images of Saturn's aurora were obtained on 13 days in Jan. 2004 as the Cassini spacecraft measured the approaching solar wind properties. Clear general correlations have been found ... [more ▼]

A series of HST STIS UV images of Saturn's aurora were obtained on 13 days in Jan. 2004 as the Cassini spacecraft measured the approaching solar wind properties. Clear general correlations have been found between the auroral power and a) Saturn's kilometric radiation, and b) the solar wind dynamic pressure, but not with the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field. While these general correlations are now well established, a closer examination of the data raises many interesting questions. Saturn's auroral emissions exhibit both local time and co-rotational properties, the auroral oval does not appear centered on the magnetic and rotational pole, the auroral emissions exhibit large and unexpected motions in latitude with time and/or planetary rotation, and the auroral oval does not appear continuous, but broken with longitude. This talk will present a more detailed look at Saturn's aurora from the HST images, with a comparison of auroral emission properties to those at the Earth and Jupiter. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Solar Wind Upstream of Saturn: Cassini Plasma measurements and Saturn's Aurora
Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Barraclough, B. et al

Conference (2004, May 17)

For a full solar rotation in January and early February, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble and Chandra Space Telescopes were used to make simultaneous observations of the solar wind and Saturn's ... [more ▼]

For a full solar rotation in January and early February, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble and Chandra Space Telescopes were used to make simultaneous observations of the solar wind and Saturn's aurora. We report here on initial results from data taken with the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer's electron and high-resolution ion sensors in the solar wind upstream of Saturn. These measurements, combined with those of other particles and fields instruments on Cassini show two shock and corotating interaction regions, which reached Saturn approximately twelve hours later. An auroral response to each of these events was observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. [less ▲]

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See detailComparisons of Saturn Kilometric Radiation and Saturn's UV Aurora
Kurth, William; Gurnett, D. A.; Clarke, J. T. et al

Conference (2004, May 17)

During the period 8 to 30 January 2004, a campaign to study the correlation between the solar wind and the response of Saturn's aurora was carried out using Cassini and the Hubble Space Telescope. In ... [more ▼]

During the period 8 to 30 January 2004, a campaign to study the correlation between the solar wind and the response of Saturn's aurora was carried out using Cassini and the Hubble Space Telescope. In particular, fields and particles instruments on Cassini were used to monitor the solar wind near Saturn and Saturn kilometric radio emissions nearly continuously. STIS images from Hubble were obtained approximately every other day to record Saturn's UV auroral morphology and intensity. In this paper we focus particularly on the relationship between the Saturn kilometric emissions and the auroral brightness and morphology. The radio emissions are generally believed to be generated by the cyclotron maser instability on auroral field lines similar to the situation for auroral kilometric radiation at Earth. A number of studies have shown a direct relationship between the radio emissions and discrete auroral arcs at Earth. Hence, one expects a relationship between the radio emissions and the aurora at Saturn. During the campaign, two corotating interaction regions (CIRs) swept past Cassini and Saturn (which were of order 0.5 AU apart at the time). Accompanying the CIRs were high solar wind densities. As expected from Voyager studies, the higher solar wind density resulted in generally more intense radio emissions. The UV images show that Saturn's UV aurora brighten considerably in response to the CIRs, as well. Furthermore, the brightest aurora usually appear in the local morning, consistent with the Voyager-determined SKR source region on field lines connecting to the magnetopause and the Kelvin-Helmholtz hypothesis for the origin of accelerated electrons. A more detailed examination of the auroral phenomena show much more complex variations, however. The radio emission frequency extent and peak frequency vary remarkably from one Saturn rotation to the next. Similarly, the auroral morphology changes dramatically. For example, it appears the evolution of the auroral oval to higher latitudes (higher L-shells) is correlated with a shift in the frequency of peak radio emissions to lower frequencies. This can be explained through an analysis of the cyclotron maser beaming geometry. We examine this and other aspects of the correlations between the radio emissions and the aurora. [less ▲]

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