References of "Esposito, L"
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See detailCassini UVIS Observations of Varying Auroral Emissions on Saturn's Night Side
Pryor, W.; Esposito, L.; Jouchoux, A. et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
See detailSaturn Auroral Movies from Cassini UVIS
Pryor, W. R.; Stewart, I.; Esposito, L. et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed four years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed four years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to construct spectral images of Saturn. Auroral emissions are seen from electron-excited molecular and atomic hydrogen. In 2008 UVIS obtained data with the spacecraft well out of Saturn's ring plane, permitting UVIS to obtain a number of short movies of the rotating auroral structures. In some movies a cusp-like feature is present near noon inside the oval. One movie from 2008 day 201 shows parallel linear features on the day side almost at right angles to the main auroral oval that appear, then lengthen, separate in the middle, and then fade away. The same movie also shows one bright "polar flare" inside the oval. A few of the most recent images were obtained at sufficiently close range that 2 spacecraft slews were needed to completely cover the oval. These images provide almost 100 pixels of information across the oval and clearly show multiple arcs of emission on the main oval and scattered emissions inside the oval. We will discuss these features, their locations, and possible interpretations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (2 ULg)
See detailTitan Airglow Spectra from Cassini UVIS
Ajello, J. M.; Gustin, Jacques ULg; Stevens, M. et al

Conference (2007, December 01)

We present the first UV airglow observations of Titan's atmosphere by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on Cassini. The known UV emissions of Titan have been examined with higher spectral ... [more ▼]

We present the first UV airglow observations of Titan's atmosphere by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on Cassini. The known UV emissions of Titan have been examined with higher spectral resolution (0.4 nm FWHM) by the Cassini UVIS than in the past by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) (3.0 nm FWHM). The UVIS observations, confirming Voyager UVS results, have shown that molecular nitrogen is the major constituent of the upper atmosphere of Titan. Using one spectral channel in the EUV from 56--118 nm and one in the FUV from 112--191 nm, the UVIS observed the disk on 13 December, 2004. The combined EUV and FUV spectral region is a probe of the stratosphere-mesosphere-thermosphere-exosphere region from about 300--2000 km. The EUV spectrum consists of three band systems of N2 (b {1}Πu, b' {1}Σu+, c{4'} {1}Σ{u+}--X {1}Σ{g+}), while the FUV spectrum consists of one N2 (a {1}Πg--X {1}Σ{g+}). The UVIS observations reveal that the c{4'}(0)--X(0) vibrational band near 95.8 nm is suppressed, and that N \sc{i} multiplets near 95.32 and 96.45 nm are present instead. Magnetospheric particle excitation is weak on this orbit, since the nightside EUV spectrum shows no observable N2 emission features and only H Lyman-β. The absence of significant darkside emission demonstrates that nitrogen emissions are predominantly excited on this orbit by photoelectrons near 900 km in the thermosphere. Above 145 nm most of the observed signal is due to sunlight reflected by N2 in the Titan mesosphere-stratosphere and modified by aerosol and hydrocarbon absorption. Mixing ratios of C2H2, C4H2, C2H4 and tholins have been derived from the reflected sunlight emission between 145 and 190 nm, using a Rayleigh scattering model. Assuming that the energy deposition at these wavelengths occurs near 300 km, these mixing ratios are in good agreement with recent photochemical models and previous Voyager observations in the IR. We also present the first geometric albedo measurement of Titan from 150--190 nm. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
See detailAuroral Movies and Spectroscopy from Cassini UVIS
Pryor, W. R.; West, R.; Stewart, I. et al

Conference (2007, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed three years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed three years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to construct spectral images of Saturn. Auroral emissions are seen from electron-excited molecular and atomic hydrogen. In 2007 UVIS obtained data with the spacecraft well out of Saturn's ring plane, permitting us to create images, spectra, and at times movies. We will present an auroral movie from 2007-145 that has been processed to remove flat-fielding artifacts and deconvolved to remove scattering along the slit. The movie shows near co- rotation of N polar auroral features with the planet's rotation. An auroral oval is present. The oval appears doubled on the midnight side. Other images from this year show emissions inside the auroral oval. We will discuss these images and their spectra. Additional images and movies are planned in coming months. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULg)
See detailCassini UVIS Observations of Saturn's Auroras
Pryor, W. J.; Ajello, J. M.; Gustin, Jacques ULg et al

Conference (2007, June 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
See detailSaturn's Auroras and Polar Atmosphere from Cassini UVIS
Pryor, W. R.; West, R.; Larsen, K. et al

Conference (2006, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed two years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed two years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to construct spectral images of Saturn, with sufficient spatial resolution to image Saturn's auroral oval when Cassini leaves Saturn's equatorial plane. We will present new images and time-series data from summer 2006. Detailed spectral models of molecular hydrogen auroral emissions that include hydrocarbon absorption and hydrogen self- absorption have now been compared to UVIS data. We are analyzing a UV spectral feature detected in an auroral oval image from 2005. The feature is an absorption feature concentrated inside the oval, at wavelengths dominated by reflected sunlight and acetylene absorption. The absorption feature appears as a broad absorption "scoop". One plausible molecule that has a similar absorption feature is benzene, which has a cross-section some 500 times larger than acetylene in this spectral region. Thus UVIS is sensitive to small quantities of benzene. Enhanced polar benzene has been previously observed at Jupiter and can be generated in coupled photochemical/auroral models. We will explore the uniqueness of this interpretation, and compare the inferred benzene abundances to results from complementary Cassini CIRS infrared observations. Additional out of the equatorial plane UVIS Saturn data planned for the coming months will improve the signal- to-noise ratio and spatial resolution on the auroral ovals and their interior. Coordinated observations with Cassini VIMS and Hubble Space Telescope are being scheduled for 2007. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)
See detailObservations of Saturn's Atmosphere and Auroras by Cassini UVIS and VIMS
Pryor, W. R.; Baines, K.; West, R. et al

Conference (2005, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed a year of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed a year of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to build up spectral images of Saturn, with sufficient spatial resolution to reveal Saturn's auroral oval. Saturn images include evidence for rapid auroral variations and polar UV-dark regions mostly inside the auroral ovals. Absorption bands of acetylene are clearly seen in the reflected sunlight spectrum. The auroral emission spectrum is similar to that of Jupiter, showing H2 band emission and H Lyman-alpha emission. Saturn's auroral, dayglow, and nightglow spectra show significant differences. Saturn's aurora is observed to vary in brightness by at least a factor of four. The brightest auroral emissions seen so far occurred after 2004 day 207 19:30 when Cassini CAPS and MAG recorded passage of a solar wind shock. The enhanced auroral brightness persisted for days, and is seen at both poles of Saturn. Cassini RPWS observed enhanced auroral kilometric emissions during several auroral brightening events seen by UVIS. A campaign of Hubble Space Telescope UV imaging with ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys) of Saturn's dayside southern auroral zone took place on 2005 February 17. Cassini UVIS and VIMS observed Saturn's nightside northern aurora during this period. The UVIS long slit was aligned with lines of latitude on Saturn, providing information about intensity and spectral variations along the auroral oval. Cassini VIMS has now obtained an initial image and spectrum of Saturn's H3}+ auroral emissions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 ULg)
See detailCassini ultraviolet imaging spectrograph observations of Saturn's auroras
Pryor, W. R.; West, R.; Stewart, A. I. F. et al

Conference (2005, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
See detailCassini UVIS and HST STIS Time-Resolved Jupiter Auroral Data Compared to QP Radio Bursts
Pryor, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Stewart, I. et al

Poster (2003)

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Jupiter in a 4-sec integration "high time-resolution mode" on Jan 8, 13-14, and 20-21 in 2001. In this mode Extreme-Ultraviolet and Far ... [more ▼]

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Jupiter in a 4-sec integration "high time-resolution mode" on Jan 8, 13-14, and 20-21 in 2001. In this mode Extreme-Ultraviolet and Far-Ultraviolet spectra were obtained with reduced spectral and spatial resolution in order to study rapid variations in H2 band and H Lyman alpha emission. Previous work has shown that the region inside Jupiter's main auroral ovals contains highly variable spots of emission (auroral flares) that persist for typically 1 or 2 minutes. This duration is similar to that in Jupiter's quasi-periodic (QP) radio bursts. We compare UVIS data to simultaneous Galileo Plasma Wave Subsystem (PWS) and Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Subsystem (RPWS) observations. Jan 8 was an active period for UV variability, that we associate with polar auroral flares. There is a correlation between the radio and UV bursts in this period, suggesting that they are related phenomena. We will also explore coordinated Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) time-tagged UV images from Dec 14 and Dec 16, 2000, and Jan 13-14, and Jan 20-21, 2001 to study the spatial properties of the auroral flares. The auroral emissions inside the main oval were most prominent in the Dec 14, 2000 HST data. We acknowledge support from the Cassini Project, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the NASA OSS Minority University Initiative. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
See detailCassini UVIS time-resolved Jupiter auroral data compared to QP radio bursts
Pryor, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Stewart, I. et al

Poster (2003)

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Jupiter in a 4-sec integration "high time-resolution mode" on Jan 8, 13-14, and 20-21 in 2001. In this mode Extreme-Ultraviolet and Far ... [more ▼]

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Jupiter in a 4-sec integration "high time-resolution mode" on Jan 8, 13-14, and 20-21 in 2001. In this mode Extreme-Ultraviolet and Far-Ultraviolet spectra were obtained with reduced spectral and spatial resolution in order to study rapid variations in H2 band and H Lyman alpha emission. Previous work has shown that the region inside Jupiter's main auroral ovals contains highly variable spots of emission (auroral flares) that persist for typically 1 or 2 minutes. This duration is similar to that in Jupiter's quasi-periodic (QP) radio bursts. We compare UVIS data to simultaneous Galileo Plasma Wave Subsystem (PWS) and Cassini Radio PWS (RPWS) observations. Jan 8 was an active period for UV variability, that we associate with polar auroral flares. There is a correlation between the radio and UV bursts in this period, suggesting that they are related phenomena. We will also explore coordinated Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph time-tagged UV images from Jan 13-14 and Jan 20-21, 2001 to study the spatial properties of the auroral flares. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
See detailCassini UVIS Auroral Observations of Jupiter
Pryor, W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Esposito, L. et al

Conference (2002, July 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)