References of "Abdrakhmatov, K"
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See detailDetailed Seismic Hazard Assessment for The Central Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan
Lamair, Laura ULg; Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg; Abdrakhmatov, K

Poster (2012, August 23)

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See detailInvestigating rock-slope failures in the Tien Shan: State-of-the-art and perspectives of international cooperation (M111).
Strom, A.; Korup, O.; Abdrakhmatov, K. et al

Scientific conference (2005)

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See detailProbabilistic PGA and Arias Intensity maps of Kyrgyzstan (Central Asia)
Abdrakhmatov, K.; Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg; Delvaux, Delphine ULg et al

in Journal of Seismology (2003), 7(2), 203-220

New probabilistic seismic hazard and Arias Intensity maps have been developed for the territory of the Kyrgyz Republic and bordering regions. Data were mainly taken from the seismic catalogue of ... [more ▼]

New probabilistic seismic hazard and Arias Intensity maps have been developed for the territory of the Kyrgyz Republic and bordering regions. Data were mainly taken from the seismic catalogue of Kyrgyzstan and partly from the world seismic catalogue. On the base of seismicity and active tectonics, seismic zones were outlined over the area. For these, Gutenberg-Richter laws were defined using mainly instrumental data, but regarding also historical events. Attenuation of acceleration inside the target area could not be determined experimentally since existing strong motion data are insufficient. Therefore, empirical laws defined for other territories, principally Europe and China, were applied to the present hazard computations. Final maps were calculated with the SEISRISKIII program according to EUROCODE8 criteria, i.e. for a period of 50 years with 90% probability of non-exceedance. For long-term prediction, 100 years maps with 90% probability of non-exceedance have been developed. The procedure used for seismic hazard prediction in terms of PGA (Peak Ground Acceleration) was also applied to Arias intensities in order to be able to define regional seismogenic landslide hazard maps. [less ▲]

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See detailSeismic triggering of landslides, Part A: Field evidence from the Northern Tien Shan
Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg; Strom, A.; Jongmans, D. et al

in Natural Hazards & Earth System Sciences (2003), 3

Landslides triggered by strong earthquakes often caused most of the global damage and most of all casualties related to the events, such as shown by the M = 7.7 Peru earthquake in 1970, by the M = 7.6 El ... [more ▼]

Landslides triggered by strong earthquakes often caused most of the global damage and most of all casualties related to the events, such as shown by the M = 7.7 Peru earthquake in 1970, by the M = 7.6 El Salvador earthquake in 2001 or by the M = 7.4 Khait (Tajikistan) earthquake in 1949. The obvious impact of a landslide on the population is directly related to its movement. Yet, prediction of future failure potential and hence future risk to population is necessary in order to avoid further catastrophes and involves the analyses of the origin of seismic instability. The seismic landslide potential is mainly determined by the interaction between the regional seismic hazard and local geological conditions. At a local scale, seismic factors interfering with geological conditions can produce site-specific ground motions. The influence of such Site Effects on instability is the principal topic of this paper, which is divided into two parts, A and B. The present Part A is concerned with the correlation of field data with observed instability phenomena. Field data were obtained on mainly three landslide sites in the Northern Tien Shan Mountains in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia. Geophysical prospecting, earthquake recordings, geological observation, trenching and geotechnical tests were the main investigation tools. The collected information gives an insight in the geological background of the slope failure and allows us to roughly infer failure mechanisms from field evidence. A detailed analysis of the susceptibility of a mechanism to specific geological conditions will be shown in Part B. [less ▲]

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See detailSite effect analysis around the seismically induced Ananevo, Rockslide, Kyrgyzstan
Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg; Jongmans, D.; Faccioli, E. et al

in Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2002), 92(8), 3190-3209

In 1911, the surface-wave magnitude 8.2 Kemin earthquake hit northeastern Tien Shan (Kyrgyzstan), close to the cities of Bishkek and Almaty, the capitals of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, respectively ... [more ▼]

In 1911, the surface-wave magnitude 8.2 Kemin earthquake hit northeastern Tien Shan (Kyrgyzstan), close to the cities of Bishkek and Almaty, the capitals of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, respectively. Several hundreds of people were killed by the earthquake, some by indirect effects such as landslides and mudflows. A particular but nonfatal landslide triggered by the Kemin event was a rockslide in the vicinity of Ananevo, north of lake Issyk Kul (Kyrgyzstan) rockslide located above the fault zone activated in 1911. In the summer of 1999, a geophysical-seismological field trip was organized to study geology and to record seismic ground motions on and around the Ananevo rockslide. The work was part of project assessing seismogenic landslide hazard in northern Kyrgyzstan, based on various case studies of slope failures in connection with site-specific ground-motion dynamics. The geophysical investigations consisted of seismic refraction tests processed as 2D seismic tomographies and surface-wave inversion, which were combined to build a 3D geophysical model of the landslide site. Ground motions from small earthquakes were analyzed using several techniques to define site effects over the mountain massif. Both H/V and standard spectral ratios indicated lower dominant frequencies with stronger amplification in the crest region with respect to the mountain slope. These effects could be partially simulated by I D, 2D, and 3D finite-element modeling. By comparing the numerical results with the experimental data, the presence of a surficial low-velocity layer of varying thickness appeared to be the key factor controlling the ground motion around the rockslide. [less ▲]

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See detailGEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED SURFACE EFFECTS: CASE STUDY OF A LANDSLIDE IN THE SUUSAMYR VALLEY, KYRGYZSTAN
Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg; Jongmans, D.; Abdrakhmatov, K. et al

in Surveys in Geophysics (2000), 21

In summer 1998, a geophysical survey including seismic profiles and electrical tomography has been carried out in the Suusamyr valley, Kyrgyzstan. The scope was to investigate surface effects induced by ... [more ▼]

In summer 1998, a geophysical survey including seismic profiles and electrical tomography has been carried out in the Suusamyr valley, Kyrgyzstan. The scope was to investigate surface effects induced by the Ms = 7.3 Suusamyr earthquake, the 19th of August, 1992. In this paper, special attention is paid to the case study of a debris slide triggered by the earthquake. Seismic data are analysed by P-wave refraction technique and by surface wave inversion. Electrical tomographic profiles are processed by 2D-inversion. Using geotechnical and geological information, P-velocity models and resistivity sections are interpreted in terms of geological materials, in order to build a geological 3D model. On the basis of the latter, we carried out static finite element computations as well as static and pseudo-static calculations with Janbu’s method. Newmark displacement was computed, considering or not the influence of the shallow soft deposits. The results are compared to the real displacement observed in the field and conclusions are drawn about the mechanism of the landslide. [less ▲]

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